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We were all expecting iWork news on Tuesday. Apple’s Roger Rosner had taken a considerable amount of time at this year’s WWDC to showcase their new iWork web apps and then briefly mentioned that new versions of the native iWork apps would be coming this fall.

What we got instead, though, was the surprising claim that iWork is the best selling suite of mobile productivity applications (which, I suppose, isn’t actually that surprising since “mobile” wouldn’t include Microsoft Office on laptops) followed by the announcement that iWork and iLife apps would all be free with new iOS devices going forward. Combine that with the free online iWork apps in iCloud, and Microsoft Office has the stiffest competition it’s faced in well over a decade.

Google can boast businesses that have gone Google, but Apple has its best shot ever at convincing the rest of us that its beautiful documents, spreadsheets, and presentations apps are more than enough to leave Office Home & Student behind.

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Back in July, we wrote an extensive overview of the fully revamped DaisyDisk 3, and found it a very welcome update to the most original way to clean up your Mac’s HDD. It took a bit longer for the new version to get released, but it’s finally here and better than ever.

The new DaisyDisk is faster than ever, taking only 22 seconds to scan my MacBook Air’s internal SSD, and works with the latest Mac tech including Thunderbolt drives and Retina displays. But it’s not just about a slicker UI; it also lets you dig deeper than before, so you can see the biggest files inside bundled files (such as apps), and is smart enough to warn you before letting you delete a file that is crucial to your Mac’s operation.

DaisyDisk 3

The Mac App Store version of DaisyDisk 3 is slightly less powerful than its stand-alone version this time, though, due to sandboxing restrictions. You’ll still be able to scan your whole disk and external disks with a Mac App Store copy of DaisyDisk 3, but won’t be able to scan as administrator or dig into hidden file space with it. For the latter, you’ll need a stand-alone copy of DaisyDisk from the DaisyDisk store.

If you already own a stand-alone or App Store version of DaisyDisk, v3.0 is a free update that you’ll want to install and take for a spin immediately. Otherwise, you can pickup your own copy from the Mac App Store or the DaisyDisk Store for $9.99 — definitely not bad for one of the most beautifully designed apps in the App Store that’ll help you save precious space on your internal SSD.

Continue Reading our Full Review of DaisyDisk 3

Apple started out OS X with annual releases of new versions, but then settled into an upgrade every two years up until the release of Mountain Lion almost exactly one year after Lion came out. Here we stand, a bit over a year later, expectantly waiting for OS X Mavericks to come out. Everyone’s not waiting, though, and both the VMware Fusion and Parallels teams have just released their latest virtualization offerings for the Mac that both feature Mavericks support among other new features.

Parallels has released an annual upgrade ever year since it was released, but VMware tended more towards the 2 year mark between major releases. Now, though, both companies are releasing new versions in lockstep with new versions of OS X, and if you are serious about running Linux or Windows on your Mac, you’ll be upgrading both OS X and your virtualization tool of choice each year. And this year, you’ve got more choices than ever as both apps are trying harder to appeal to casual users and the more advanced needs of IT teams.

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Droplr‘s been a crowd-favorite way to quickly share files from your Mac’s menubar for years, one that’s one many over including myself. Its basic file-sharing service is fast and customizable with a pro account, and its apps are far more powerful while staying as simple to use as its competition. And now, it’s taking steps to take its pro accounts beyond basic file sharing.

The brand-new Droplr Draw is the first step towards that new future. With the latest v3.5 update to Droplr’s app, you’ll find an included basic annotation app to quickly markup and share images on Droplr. Either select the new Capture & Draw Screenshot option in the menubar app, or press Alt+Shift+4 to directly select an area of the screen (or additionally press your spacebar and select a window) and capture a screenshot that’ll then be opened directly in the Droplr Draw app. (more…)

The App Store’s arrival on the Mac is hard to classify as anything other than a good thing. It’s made great indie Mac apps more discoverable for new Mac users, helped spur the transition of many apps from the iPad back to the Mac, lowered the price of Apple’s pro apps, and even made installing updates for OS X and apps a simple process — one that gets even simpler in Mavericks. I’ve spent hundreds of dollars on Mac App Store apps, and there’s every indicator that I’ll spend hundreds more over the coming decades.

And yet, it’s not perfect. Its sandbox restrictions have prevented apps like TextExpander from releasing their newest versions in the App Store, and the review process is slow enough that you’ll have to wait days after updates are ready to get them in your apps. But worst of all, there’s no way to offer upgrade pricing for new versions of apps. Instead, developers have to either release new versions as a free update for those who have purchased their apps already, or just make a “new” app for the new version, perhaps with a launch-day special price as an overture to those who owned the previous version.

For developers like the Omni Group, that just wouldn’t work out. (more…)

CloudApp and Droplr have been the two main ways most of us quickly share one-off files from our Macs. They’re so simple to use, it’s hard to find a reason not to keep one of them around. But then, they’re so similar, it’s tough to pick between the two.

I’ve used CloudApp for years now, even sticking with it after digging deeply into the differences between the two apps. But recently, I’ve switched to Droplr. Their new Mac app and iOS apps are so nice, it’s hard not to switch to Droplr once you’ve tried it again.

The new Droplr for Mac

The new Droplr for Mac

I wrote about the reasons I switched to Droplr, and why you should give it a shot, over on Web.AppStorm. Check out the full article for the scoop on why, right now, Droplr is the best simple way to share files.

Continue Reading on Web.AppStorm…

Need to convert videos and audio to different formats often? The latest version of MacX Video Converter Pro just might be what you need — and it’s for free until July 25th. MacX Video Converter Pro lets you convert video in over 320 formats to the exact format you need, so your videos will look perfect on any device. Plus, it can record your screen or your FaceTime camera, giving you an easy way to make a screencast. The latest version is faster than ever, so you won’t have to worry about your videos taking too long to convert.

Screen Shot 2013-07-12 at 5.29.15 PM

All you’ll need to to get your free copy is head over to the MacX Video Converter site, download a copy, and activate it with the following key before July 25th:

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If you happen to have a Windows PC, you can get a copy of it from their Windows site as well. And enjoy!

This time, the giveaway’s open to anyone — Envato staff, writers, Mr. Scrooge, and anyone else who needs to convert videos!

If you’re still using Google Reader, there’s a weekend project that you’ve got to take on: exporting your RSS feeds, and finding a new RSS reader app. That’s because it’s the end of June already, and Google’s shutting down Google Reader on Monday!

Over at Web.AppStorm, we’ve written a tutorial for getting your data out of Google Reader — including your favorites — and into other services. Then, we’ve just rounded up the 5 best online replacements for Google Reader, most of which already work with Mac and iOS apps you likely already have tried out. They’re all great, and we’re sure you’ll find one you like there — even without leaving your Mac behind.

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We all expected to see iOS 7 at the WWDC keynote. That one was a given. The next version of OS X was also practically a given, but didn’t seem nearly as anticipated. New Macs were a nice extra, that both weren’t surprising to see but none of us would have been that surprised if they hadn’t been included. A new version of iWork and iLife were hoped for, but again, we’d almost given up hope that Apple would have time for anything besides iOS 7.

But practically no one was expecting that Apple would spend a serious amount of time during the keynote talking about web apps. And yet they did. Apple, the company that almost entirely makes software just for its own devices took the time to show us how great their new iWork for iCloud apps worked in Chrome on Windows 8. iWork has always been seen as a distant runner-up to Microsoft Office, the 900lb gorilla in the room whenever you talk about apps for word processing, presentations, and spreadsheets. The very fact that the iPad doesn’t have Office has been used as an advertisement point for Microsoft’s Surface ads. But we all thought the discussion was long-since beyond Office, and we’ve all learned to get along very well without it, thank you very much.

Apple isn’t in the business of leaving well enough alone, though, and they’re taking their own Office competitor directly to Microsoft’s homefront. If you’ve stuck with Office simply because others won’t be able to preview your files if you use iWork — or if you’ve stayed away since you occasionally need to edit from a PC — here’s why iWork for iCloud just might be the best thing to happen to iWork yet. It’s a bold foray into Microsoft’s territory, just as Microsoft launches its own Office apps on the iPhone. (more…)

At the opening keynote of their World Wide Developer Conference, Apple wasted no time in introducing dozens of improvements to OS X as part of their 10.9 Mavericks release. And no, a Maverick isn’t a big cat you’ve never heard of, it’s the first in their series of releases named for places in Apple’s home, California. But the changes in OS X extend far beyond a new naming convention reaching to all corners of the OS with everything from a more refined (leather-free) interface to new power management under the hood allowing all day battery life on some MacBooks.

Read on to find out more.
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