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Native Mac clients for social networks are a massive market – Twitter is the obvious example here, with a vast number of awesome apps. Even Instagram has a few nice solutions. But what about the biggest social network out there, Facebook? It has over 750 million users, and there’s no market leader for native clients.

Today, I’ll be having a look at what options we have if we want a Facebook app, if any of them are any good, and why this market desperately needs a game-changer. (more…)

Today we’re going to take a look at Simplify, an attractive and convenient way to interact with Spotify from your desktop.

Read on to see if you should download Simplify to help manage your Spotify addiction!


Good news! We’ve chosen our five winners. The following readers will receive an email shortly with details on claiming your prize. To everyone else, thanks for entering and be sure to check back next week for another awesome giveaway!


VirtualDJ was first released in 2003 and over the years has grown into a real success story for Atomix Productions, providing professional DJ’s and hobbyists with effective DJ software. Originally sold in shops, this multi-platform ‘Home’ version is now available for free in the Mac App Store and sees the developers adopt an innovative pricing model to offer a largely uncrippled and feature-packed app in the hope of enticing users to eventually upgrade, with the end result being a big win for the consumer.

Let’s take a closer look at this innovative App Store favourite.


Now that Lion has been out for a while, many of us have downloaded it on our primary computers and are now using the operating system full-time. As far as stability goes, the reports that we’re receiving are a bit scattered.

For my part, Lion roars along nicely. I upgraded the day it launched and apart from an initial slowdown while Spotlight finished indexing, I can’t say that I’ve run into a single major issue that couldn’t be addressed in a few minutes or less (even on my ancient 2007 MacBook).

However, I’ve heard several people, including some of our own writers, describe OS X Lion as an “extremely buggy” and all around unstable release. Given the variety of different Mac setups that exist, there are bound to be some pretty disparate experiences from users. Today we want to know what you think. Is Lion solid as a rock or one big, buggy mess?

Cast your vote in the poll and then leave a comment below telling us about some of the persistent problems you’ve run into and what machine you’re running.

We’d like to take a moment to say a big thank you to this week’s sponsor, Box Shot 3D.

As a graphic designer, I am constantly faced with the task of creating 3D product mockups. Unfortunately, 3D modeling programs are extremely expensive, quite cumbersome and can take years to master. Box Shot 3D has come to my rescue quite a few times.

Box Shot 3D allows you to render custom software boxes, book covers, magazines, CD, DVD and Blu-Ray boxes, cans, bottles, mugs, bags and much more. No 3D-knowledge is required at all and the results look very professional because of the raytracing rendering technology.

So Easy, Anyone Can Use It

Box Shot 3D provides probably the easiest way to create virtual boxes for representing software products on the web or to create 3D book images for e-books. Box Shot 3D is used by thousands of designers around the world to represent their work to customers, as it supports more than 50 different shapes and most of them can be configured. It is also possible to render external 3D files.

What’s New?

The latest updates feature the support of multiple shapes in a single scene, external Collada files, sample ready-to-use scenes, image transformations and lots of other improvements.

Go Try It Out!

Box Shot 3D runs on Mac and Windows and is available for $80. Be sure to stop by the website to download the free trial version and see what you think!

We’d like to say a big thank you to this month’s Mac.AppStorm sponsors, and the great software they create! If you’re interested in advertising, you can purchase a banner advertisement through BuySellAds, or sign up for a Weekly Sponsorship slot.

Thank you to the fantastic applications we had sponsoring each week during the month, all of which we personally recommend you download and try out!

  • Jumsoft Money – Money provides small businesses and home users with a simple and remarkably effective way to track their financial records and create budgets. Among other novelties, the new Money 4 features a fully redesigned user interface, allows direct downloads from financial institutions, and institutes smart importing rules and a document-based system that allows multiple users to work with a single copy of the application.
  • Screeny – Screeny is a beautiful, simple and effective utility for taking screenshots and recording screencasts. The controls are basic enough that you can pick the app up immediately and powerful enough that you can create just what you want with almost no effort.
  • Postbox – Postbox is one of the most powerful alternatives to that you’ll find anywhere and is a simply incredible email client. In addition to your favorite standard Postbox features like tabs and beautiful reply formatting, Postbox 2.5 sports several brand new features that make it even more irresistible.
  • Raskin -Raskin represents an entirely new way of interacting with and managing your open applications and windows. It makes finding, organizing, previewing, and opening documents a fast and remarkably seamless process.

Finally, thanks to you for reading AppStorm this month, and for checking out the software that our sponsors create. I really appreciate it – you make the site what it is!

I’m the kind of person that likes things to be neat and organized, but I don’t like it enough to put a lot of effort into making it happen. I’m mostly content to be moderately irritated by things being out of order in exchange for not having to waste time organizing, alphabetizing, labeling or tagging. Since my recent hard drive failure, I’ve been dreading transferring music from my iPod back to my computer because I’d forgotten that all the hard work I did updating song metadata hadn’t been synced to my iPod.

I was naturally very intrigued by Little App Factory’s new app Tagalicious, which promises to clean up your iTunes library quickly and painlessly by auto-detecting track metadata and updating it in iTunes. Read on to find out if it succeeds!


Whether you’re a photographer, designer, writer or any other creative sort, you’ve probably either uploaded images to Flickr, downloaded images from Flickr, or both. It’s easily the most ubiquitous photo sharing site on the planet.

Today we’re going to take a quick look at some awesome desktop apps that will let you search, view and download Flickr images on your Mac.


Along with a ton of great new features, OS X Lion brings about at least one fairly controversial change: the default behavior for scrolling has been reversed. It used to the case that if you wanted to scroll down the page, you made a downward swiping gesture, and of course the reverse of that for going back up.

However, the iPhone changed things up a bit. With the direct interaction model, it felt more natural to move the page instead of the scroll position, so to scroll down on an iPhone, iPad or iPod Touch, you swipe up.

When you’re directly interacting with a touchscreen, this scrolling model is incredibly intuitive. You reach out and touch the page and move it freely in any direction that you please. Your brain immediately understands what’s happening and there is zero adjustment period.

With Lion, OS X has picked up this system. Now the scroll gesture acts as if you’re reaching out and touching the screen: swipe up to scroll down. Now instead of moving the scroll bars, you must imagine that you’re tossing the page.

For some, the new system immediately made sense and required very little adjustment time. However, many users are complaining that the indirect nature of a mouse or trackpad is in conflict with the direct model of scrolling. Our brains are already so set on the way things have been for years that it’s difficult to reprogram them, especially since there doesn’t seem to be a pressing need to do so.

Today we want to know what you think. Do you like natural scrolling in Lion? Or do you wish Apple would subscribe to the “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it” theory? Have you decided whether or not to adjust to the new system or revert back to the old way? Vote in the poll above and leave your thoughts in the comments below.

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