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At this point, you probably know all about the newest update to Apple’s legendary operating system: OS X Lion. It has over 250 new features, including new gestures, full-screen apps, Mission Control, Launchpad and all kinds of other goodies that I just can’t wait to get my hands on.

The demos at WWDC had us all drooling over this new toy and we learned that it will hit the Mac App Store in July for a mere $29.99! This marks a serious shift in the way that Apple does business. Never before have they released a major operating system update as a download-only product. At over 4GB, many are nervous about the logistics of this affair. It’s easy to imagine Apple forums filling up on launch day with stories from frustrated users.

Today we want to know whether or not you will purchase and download Lion right away. Will you hit the Mac App Store as soon as possible on launch day or wait a while to see how things work out for early adopters before jumping on the bandwagon? Vote in the poll and leave a comment below with your thoughts.

This review should, in hindsight, be more of an obituary. As you are probably aware, Apple is planning to ditch Front Row from its latest release of Mac OS X, Lion. Why is anyone’s guess, but the fact that the last update for it was released in November 2009, I think we could all see it coming.

In comparison to other applications, Front Row is very basic and only offers a limited number of functions. Apple may want people to switch to the Apple TV, a small digital media receiver which did borrow heavily from Front Row, or maybe it ditched Front Row because of the rise of other, third-party media applications.

Boxee is one of these. Although the whole app and its interface had larger TVs in mind, it can still be used on desktops without too much trouble. Boxee has been around for a little while now – the public beta was released in January 2010 – however the application is still in its beta stage of development. It does boast a neat interface and some handy in-built features so even if you don’t have a large TV, you can still gain some use out of it on your computer.

Boxee is, in my opinion, the final nail in the coffin for Front Row. Read on to find out why.

I’d like to take a moment to say a big thank you to this week’s sponsor, Jumsoft.

Jumsoft is comprised of an extremely talented team of people dedicated to bringing you stellar software products for the Mac. The apps that they’ve created are well known and solidly praised on this site and others: Money, Relationship, Operation, Home Business Trio and Process. Together these apps create an unbeatable collection of business utilities that cover everything from accounting to customer relations and beyond.

In addition to their prestigious line of apps, Jumsoft is also known for their line of add-ons for Keynote, Pages and Mail. If you want to make your documents, presentations and email messages look absolutely stunning, be sure to check out their site.

Because they’re just that great, Jumsoft even has a page full of free goodies for you to download and try today!

It’s time for another “Ask the Editor” post today. A big thank you to everyone who sent in their questions – it’s great to have the chance to help you out with your Mac-related queries and quibbles.

Today I’ll be offering some advice about what Thunderbolt means for Mac users, how you can store and organise your recipes on OS X, and a particularly reliable option for an external hard drive.

Read on for plenty of handy Mac knowledge, and I hope you’ll find most of it useful for your own situation as well!


iTunes. You can’t live with it, and yet you can’t live without it. Sure, it does its job, but there are a whole lot of features which are unnecessary, and necessary features which haven’t been implemented. It has Ping, a social network used by about 7 people, but no support for AVI videos, a video format loved by millions. Unfortunately for us, there aren’t many decent alternatives.

Miro 4 was released recently, and although Miro was always an iTunes competitor, version 4 has really brought it into its own. The 100% free and open source media library does all of the things you want iTunes to do, and more. But is it worth abandoning iTunes for? Read on to find out.


Good news! We’ve chosen our five winners to receive a free copy of the Mac Essentials Bundle. Check the list below to see if you won. If you’re one of the lucky winners, go check your email right away for download instructions. The Bundle ends today at at 11:59 PM PST so you’ll only have on shot to redeem your prize!


  • Mekanics
  • Joe Casabona
  • Eden T.
  • Goran Halusa
  • Lia Belle

Didn’t Win? Get $5 Off!

Unfortunately, despite a huge response, only five people could win a free copy of the bundle. However, everyone can shave $5 off the price of the bundle right now by following the link below!

Save $5 Now on the StackSocial Mac Essentials Bundle: Click Here


After my flatbed scanner died around a decade ago, I completely gave up with owning one. They were slow, clunky, and something that I only used half a dozen times a year. Besides, everything was going digital, and we’d soon stop receiving paper altogether, right?

Unfortunately, that never seemed to happen. And eight years later I had two filing cabinets and various files full of receipts, invoices, statements, and all manner of other correspondence. I decided that enough was enough, and picked up a ScanScap scanner to digitise all those documents.

Coupled with DevonThink Pro Office, everything has OCR performed on it (Evernote works just as well), and I’m now filing cabinet free! Scanning once again feels like a state of the art process to be doing, with a modern combination of hardware and software.

But is this something you do? I’m not sure whether a scanner is considered a necessary computer accessory any longer… Let me know your thoughts in the comments!

So the 2011 WWDC keynote finished a mere hour or two ago, and there’s a great deal to talk about! Not least the launch of the wonderfully exciting, dare I say revolutionary, iCloud.

Do you spend precious time keeping all your devices in check? Synchronising calendars, contacts, apps, and documents, or simply backing up your invaluable photos, videos, and music?

Not anymore.

Read on as we delve into the vital information about iCloud, discover the potential it has to transform the way you use your computers!


In today’s WWDC keynote, Apple shared the usual set of Mac statistics that we now almost take for granted. Notebook and desktop sales are up, the platform continues to outgrow the PC industry as a whole, and everything is going swimmingly. There’s still a major bias toward portable computers – 73% of Macs sold are notebooks.

One of the headline stories centred around what to expect in their next operating system — OS X Lion — due for release in July 2011. Not only did Apple announce that this will be a download-only release through the Mac App Store, but it’s also their lowest priced operating system to date, costing $29.99.

Let’s take a look at what you can expect from the big cat!


Many people have bandwidth limits with their ISPs, and with the amount of tempting content on the web these days, it can be hard to stick within these limits. Enter this week’s sponsor — Rubbernet — a new app from Conceited Software which tracks what apps are accessing your network connection, and how much bandwidth they are using.

Not only is this useful for monitoring bandwidth usage, but it can be used to detect any software which might be secretly sending out personal data of yours. Rubbernet is a remarkably useful application, and sports a very pretty interface.

If you have a cap on your bandwidth – or regularly use mobile internet/tethering – this is a fantastic way to keep an eye on what’s going on. I’d definitely recommend giving it a try, and downloading the free trial that’s available from the Rubbernet website.

If you’re already a fan, let us know in the comments!

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