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Apple’s known for sleek metal+glass gadgets, with clean lines, no stickers, and nothing that isn’t absolutely necessary. It’s also known for software filled with faux linen, leather, felt, candy-colored buttons, and previously, transparency, pinstripes, and brushed metal.

Microsoft, on the other hand, has set itself on a new design course, with plain colors, flat lines, and sharp typography. The new design style, previously called Metro, is a stark departure for Windows’ previous glassy Aero style, or the bubbly plastic XP Bliss style.

Microsoft’s not known for innovating on the UI front, but their recent changes in Windows 8 and their other apps has set off a wave of changes across the industry. Moving away from skeuomorphism, many newer apps like Loren Brichter’s Letterpress and Ulysses III‘s “Pure Mode” have a design that’s reminiscent of the Metro design. And now, with Jony Ive taking over UI design at Apple, many have speculated that OS X 10.9 and iOS 7 will gain a flatter UI with less skeuomorphism than Apple’s known for.

We’re wondering which you prefer. Do you love UIs that look like something real, say, a bookshelf, or does the new Metro text-first design style appeal more to you? We’d love to hear your thoughts about it in the comments below!

Pictured: Microsoft’s calendar web app and Apple’s in OS X Mountain Lion

Wunderlist has made quite a splash on the to-do list market, with free apps that work and look great on almost every platform. Perhaps it’s not as popular on the Mac thanks to our great selection of todo list apps (hello, OmniFocus, Things, and the rest of the awesome GTD apps on the App Store!).

Over time, Wunderlist has added features to its basic beginnings that make it a contender — nearly — with the top productivity apps. Now, it’s got $4.99/month pro accounts that bring unlimited subtasks, 8 new backgrounds, and (most importantly) task delegation. It’s ready to play in the big leagues now.

If you haven’t tried it in a while, be sure to check out the full article on Web.AppStorm to see how Wunderlist has matured and what it offers today. You just might want to give it another shot.

Continue reading on our full review of Wunderlist Pro at Web.AppStorm…


Another week with the selection of the coolest stuff around the web about Mac Apps is up.

Here you’ll find out about the last Skitch update, the release of Essential Anatomy and Twitter #music app and Delicious Library’s rise from the dead. Also, don’t miss our curated list of awesome deals and cool articles to improve your productivity and your reading list.


Looking for a way to keep your finances managed this year, perhaps to make next tax season a bit less frustrating? Then you need to check out Money by Jumsoft, our sponsor this week.

Money by Jumsoft presents a powerful, comprehensive, and intuitive system designed to help you keep control of your financial life. Oversee your account balances, track investments, keep budgets, and manage your bank accounts, credit cards, loans, investments, assets, and cash. And do it all in a straightforward and stylish interface.

Money’s key features include:

  • Convenient income and expense tracking
  • Easy budget planning
  • Scheduled transactions
  • Multiple options for reports
  • Investment tracking
  • Sync with Money for iPhone and iPad via Wi-Fi
  • Multiple data files
  • Password protection

Money was first released in 2003 and has won wide popularity among small businesses and home users of Macs since then. Fans of Money appreciate the combination of its high usability and the effectiveness of finance management that it provides.

Go Get It!

Ready to get your finances under control on your Mac? Then head over to the App Store and grab your own copy of Money for $38.99. Or, you can download a free trial of Money from Jumsoft’s site to make sure it works for you before buying a copy.

Think you’ve got a great app? Sign up for a Weekly Sponsorship slot just like this one.

The Cave was recently released by the same people who did Monkey Island and Maniac Mansion and some other people who did Psychonauts. That’s some pretty impressive video game chops, so it’s no surprise that adventure game-cum-platformer The Cave has been met with high expectations.

How does it perform on the Mac, and just what is the mystery of the Cave? We’ll try to find out! (more…)

Another week is close to an end here at AppStorm and we gathered the top headlines, articles and deals from all over the web that may interest you.

Do you want a sneak peek? Mailplane is out of beta, Adobe releases public beta of Lightroom 5, Wunderlist announcing their Pro plan and Pocket’s first birthday.

Have a nice reading!


City-building games got complicated really fast after SimCity 2000 released nearly 20 years ago. They remain a joy to play, but the best ones tend to come with steep learning curves.

Not so for the Virtual City series, however, as it adopts a more casual tilt on the genre. Virtual City 2: Paradise Resort offers a compact city-building experience and a lengthy scenario-based campaign to dig your mouse into. Whether you’re waiting for the new SimCity to drop on OS X or looking for an alternative city builder with a different approach, it’s worth a closer look.

Two years ago, we had the chance to talk with the CatPig Studios team about Radium. They led us behind the scenes at the inspiration behind their popular menubar radio app for the Mac, and why they develop for the Mac in particular.

The world's changed a lot in the meantime, with seemingly countless music streaming services competing to be the only way you listen to music. And yet, the Radium team has pushed on, releasing a brand-new version of Radium this year that's nicer than ever.

We got the chance to interview Kirill Zorin from CatPig Studios again this week, so here's the latest info about their work, and how they're competing in 2013's online music landscape.


Back in the summer of 2012, Slender: The Eight Pages was released on the PC and Mac, and in a short amount of time, this free, short and experimental horror game became an instant hit. With big franchises like Resident Evil and Dead Space going heavy on action rather than horror, Slender revitalized the horror genre by taking things back to basics; the simple task of walking through a creepy forest trying to find clues while being chased by an ominous figure was, and still very much is, a frightening experience.

Fast forwarding to more recent weeks, Slender’s new iteration, Slender: The Arrival, comes packed with everything that made the original so spooky while adding in a handful of new things. Unfortunately, these new things add deadweight to an otherwise impeccable experimental gaming experience.


It’s happened to all of us: you download a new app, and are all excited over its features … only to find that it really doesn’t work for you. So it lingers in Launchpad, and in all likelihood is never opened again. That is, until you one day open it by chance, and try it again. Perhaps it got an update, perhaps you were just bored, or perhaps you kept hearing people praise it and figured you missed something the first time around.

And boom, you’ve got a new favorite app. That app that didn’t work for you the first time suddenly fits like a glove. It’s perfect for you, and you wonder why you didn’t see the light sooner.

That happened to me with Alfred. I downloaded it, couldn’t get what the fuss was all about, and went back to Spotlight. Then, I tried it again a couple months later, and thought it was nice enough, so I got the powerpack. Soon, I couldn’t imagine working with Alfred, and I’m even more addicted to the awesomeness that is Alfred 2 and its workflows.

It also happened to me with PopClip, as I’ve written about before. With it, the update that added actions flew under my radar at first, but once I tried it out, I was hooked.

So, what apps grew on you over time? We’d love to hear your stories below!

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