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The Activity Monitor in OS X Mavericks has been nicely redesigned, but it’s still far from enough for anyone who wants to keep up with their Mac’s real-time stats. For a detailed overview of how your Mac is actually performing, you’ll ideally need the stats you want in your menubar or in a condensed window that shows just the stats you want to see together. That’s why you need Colossus, our sponsor this week.

Colossus is an advanced system monitor for your Mac that makes it simple to keep on top of the most important stats. For just $3.99, it lets you keep tabs on your Mac’s CPU activity, memory, download and upload speeds, battery, storage, and temperatures with an optional addon in your menubar, a floating window, or a customizable dock icon. You can keep track of as few or as many stats as you want, in the places you want.

No matter what stats you pick to be shown in the menubar and Colossus’ animated Dock icon, you can always jump into all of your Mac’s stats from the app’s full-featured floating window view that can optionally float over every other app on your desktop. There, you’ll find collapsing views that show your summary stats for every part of your Mac at a glance with more detailed info on click. Combine that with the customizable menubar and dock icon, and you’ve got the perfect monitoring app for your Mac.

Get a Copy of Colossus Today!

Colossus is a brilliant and simple way to keep up with your Mac’s stats, and it’s far cheaper than the competition while including the features and performance you need. Get your copy of Colossus from the Mac App Store for just $3.99, and start keeping up better with how your Mac and internet connection are performing.

Think you’ve got a great app? Sign up for a Weekly Sponsorship slot just like this one.

We’ve just closed our giveaway; congrats to our winners Alex, Valter, dion, Nuri, and jdnorthwest!

Apple spoiled us all last week by releasing OS X Mavericks and the new iLife and iWork apps all for free. That should have freed up some of your pennies to get some great indie apps for your Mac — and we’ve got a great bundle to share where you can get a ton of apps for said pennies.

Paddle’s newest Pay What You Want bundle includes 16 apps that are ready for your Mac with OS X Mavericks, including the Bits diary app we’ve just reviewed and Shortcat, the awesome keyboard shortcut app that was developed by a former Envato team member. There’s more, too: MenuEverywhere to get your Mac menus right inside your apps, Focus to improve your photos, Code Collector Pro to backup your code snippets, Slink to securely connect to remote networks, and more. All that for the low price of whatever you’d like to pay.

Or, you could get it for free, since we have 5 of the bundles to giveaway. Just comment below and let us know what apps you’d like most in this bundle to enter — then share the giveaway on your favorite social networks and leave another comment with a link to your shared post for an extra entry.

Hurry and get your entry in — the giveaway closes on Friday, November 1st!

Envato staff or those who have written more than two articles or tutorials for AppStorm are ineligible to enter.

Update: And like that, Apple has updated to mitigate the Gmail issues. Here’s to hoping it fixes everyone’s problems!

Did you, like me, rush out and update your Mac to run Mavericks? And did you just love the tabbed finder, added notifications and all of the other goodies? And did you then open Apple Mail, listen to the fan crank up to max and wonder why it showed 130% CPU usage in Activity Monitor?

Turns out that you’re not the only one. There’s been a shift in the way that Apple Mail handles Gmail accounts in Mavericks 10.9, and since tons of people use Gmail for their primary accounts, there’s a big problem on hand. TidBITS was the first to point it out (and that’s a great place to read the technical reasons why it’s broken), but today it’s a huge issue that needs to be fixed. Now. (more…)

Among photographic editing apps, Adobe’s Photoshop is not exactly strides ahead of the competition, particularly not in terms of the features required by the average user. Yet it holds the majority market share, mostly due to the Photoshop brand’s early establishment as the go-to image editor. Nowadays, it is a brand name we even use as a verb.

But the competition is catching up. OnOne is not as well known as Adobe, but it is a development company dedicated to photographic apps. Perfect Photo Suite 8 is the latest instalment of its flagship series, and it has just been unveiled in a pre-release beta. It is a package that is designed to work as a comprehensive standalone editor, but it is also happy to work alongside the likes of Photoshop, Lightroom and Aperture.

But can OnOne’s latest offering tempt long-time Adobe customers away from their beloved ‘shop?


It’s been a busy week for Apple fans. We knew Apple had a lot more to cover with this week’s announcement, and were rather certain that OS X Mavericks would be released sometime this week. There was the hint at WWDC of a new iWork and possibly iLife, but we wouldn’t have been way too surprised if the new versions hadn’t been announced. And yet they were, along with upgraded MacBook Pros — with the Mac Pro’s release date left as the final known Apple puzzle of the year.

Price was the theme this time, with Mavericks, iWork, and iLife all going free, the MacBook Pro and Retina Display MacBook Pro both had $200 shaved off their price, and the Mac Pro’s announced price of $2,999 is cheaper than you can build a similar PC right now. And yet, everyone’s not happy. OS X Mavericks is pretty great, but some of its includes apps such as iBooks weren’t quite as power user friendly as we would have hoped. That trend continued, with GarageBand X gaining nice new features but losing its pro tools, and Pages and Keynote looking sharper than before but losing AppleScript and most OpenType support, among other issues. The new Mac Pro would make anyone think Apple was more interested in pro users than ever, and yet their software choices make us question that pro users commitment.

All in all, I happen to like most of the new software, and am hopeful Apple will bring back some of the currently missing pro features. They’ve done that before with Final Cut Pro X, and they just might again. But what’s your thoughts on the new apps this week? Are you enjoying Mavericks and the new iWork, or sticking to your current apps for now? We’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments below.

Ever since Google bought out Sparrow, we’ve been hoping for a new best-in-class email app for the Mac. We listed the elusive .Mail as one of the main apps we hoped to see released in 2013, but alas, nothing has materialized to date.

That’s no reason for doom-and-gloom. Instead, there’s an updated in OS X Mavericks, along with the just-released Unibox and Airmail 1.2. Plus, there’s a public beta of Mail Pilot for Mac coming soon. Here’s the latest email choices on the Mac, with enough options that almost everyone should find a mail app they like for now.


iWork is Apple’s answer to Microsoft Office, and its pro apps directly compete with Adobe’s Lightroom, Premiere Pro, and Audition. But when it comes to Photoshop, the alternate even Apple itself shows off these days is Pixelmator.

Just over 6 years after the first version of Pixelmator was released, the 3rd version of Pixelmator is here with a slightly new name: Pixelmator 3 FX. This new version brings the long-awaited layer styles along with new liquify effects and a brand new, faster-than-ever editing engine.


For many, entry-level food service preparation is not a life-long dream. Yet those lusting after powering five-star, Michelin-grade dining experiences need to start from somewhere, even if that’s just a one-man operation making salads and corn dogs in the middle of a city.

Cook, Serve, Delicious! is a fun restaurant simulator that takes you through the process of running a small operating on a floor of an inner-city skyscraper and developing it into a full-on five-star experience. Through Steam, the game is available as a result of the community-based Greenlight program and today we’re going to check whether it’s worth your time. (more…)

The Realmac team's LittleSnapper was the Mac screenshot tool of choice for anyone who wanted to save more than just individual image images to Finder. LittleSnapper turned made it simple to keep a library of everything you've ever snapped, and then annotate and tweak the shots all from one app. And then they decided to start over and make a new app: Ember.

Ember was designed from the ground up to be the best way to organize all of your design inspirations — not just for geeks managing screenshots of apps, even though it's still awesome for that as well. Essentially, you throw all the pictures you want — screenshots, sure, but also photos of architecture or crafts or web design mockups — into your library to easily find them later. Throw in tags and descriptions, and you've got a whole new way to manage those images that otherwise would get lost in Finder.

And now, with the Mavericks-focused v1.2 upgrade, Ember is smart enough to help you find just what you want from your library, and keeps your image assets backed up in iCloud.


Did you watch today’s Apple Event live? Well we did, and just in case you missed something, here’s EVERYTHING that happened today in one convenient place. Ready? We bet you are. Then let’s go! (more…)

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