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Get Your Worm on With Ironworm

What happens when you put together a worm, a heavy metal frontman and a good old fashioned mace? The newest game from 10tons, apparently. Ironworm is a 2D platformer in which you must swing your mace to smash insects and complete levels.

From the graphics and storyline to the main character, Ironworm is certainly a strange and unique game. That being said, there is a lot to the game. Read on to learn more about the game, the method of play, the graphics and more.


If you take a look at the Buyers Guide on MacRumors, you’ll notice that the iMac has been lying dormant for just under a year (since May 2011 to be precise), the longest period of silence since before 2008. The site recommends that any potential iMac buyers hold off for the time being, seeing as ”updates are due soon”. This would tie in with Apple’s product refresh cycle, which usually occurs every year.

But this hibernation got me thinking about two things. Firstly, are we due to see a massive overhaul of the iMac product line sometime in May/June and secondly, have Apple forgotten about their fantastic range of desktop computers?

You’re surely no newcomer to the fad of vintage photography, led most notably by the iOS app Instagram. I’m a big fan of the app and the ease with which it lets you share cool looking pictures to all of your social networks in a matter of seconds. However, the fact that it’s only available for iOS makes it kind of a bummer, as I’m sure people without any iOS devices have felt left out (don’t worry though, it’s coming to other popular devices soon).

We’ve shown you ways to navigate through your Instagram feed from your Mac before, but we haven’t shown you just how to make your photos look as cool right from your computer instead of having to go through your phone. That’s what the app that we are reviewing today, Instant, is for. Care to check it out?


Both the iTunes App Store and the Mac App Store have given developers a great place to easily distribute their software to customers. While some developers may feel lost in a sea of competition, others find ways to stand out and become overnight success stories.

Though the two platforms are similar, it’s interesting to note the differences. For instance, it seems free apps abound on the iTunes App Store but developers seem more prone to charge for their work on the Mac platform, which isn’t a bad thing at all. Through AppStorm I’ve met lots of hardworking developers and am more than happy to drop a few bucks for a great app to help make it worth the developer’s time.

Today I’m curious about how far you’re willing to go to get your hands on an awesome app. What’s the most that you’ve ever paid to download an app from the Mac App Store? Answer the poll to be counted and then leave a comment below telling us about the apps you’ve purchased at this price point.

For countless years the use of vinyl dominated the DJ market. In the late 90s the use of CDs became more widespread as Pioneer launched the very successful CDJ CD player which offered many of the advantages of vinyl without quite so many drawbacks. In recent years the use of digital DJ software has become much more prevalent as more and more of the CD faithful turn their backs on the format and embrace digital software.

There are many options out there, from Serato Scratch Live vinyl emulation software to Ableton Live down to open source alternatives such as Mixxx which I reviewed in a previous article. In this article however I will comparing two front runners of the digital DJ world – Atomix’s Virtual DJ Pro 7 and Native Instrument’s Traktor Pro 2. If you only choose one, which one should it be? Read on to find out.


This Week in App News: 19 – 25 March 2012

This week saw some pretty big announcements in the world of Mac software, especially with the release of Photoshop CS6 beta on Thursday with a completely revamped interface and tonnes of new features aimed at making editing photos an absolute breeze.

However, Adobe news aside, let’s take a look at what else has been going on this week.

If you have your computer set up near where you sleep, and you have it hooked up to a nice sound system, you might prefer to use it as your alarm clock instead of using your cellphone or a conventional clock.

We’ve presented many alarm clock apps to you before, but today we’re here to tell you about a very pretty and affordable one that we thought you might be interested in. It’s called Wake Up Time, let’s get to it!


There are so many among us with a ton of ideas for the next Facebook, Twitter or Instagram. But, ideas are practically worthless unless you have at least a prototype in place. If you think it would be a good idea to entrust someone to make your vision for the app to come true, you are definitely mistaken.

If you are a designer by profession, then you already know the importance of a prototype. Prototypes help build a minimum viable product quickly and lock the user interface down without any ambiguity. Antetype is one of the market leaders in Mac prototyping apps and after the break let us check out how to make it a valuable part of your design workflow.


Just 5 days after we wrote about the fact that Adobe was putting the finishing touches on Creative Suite 6, which promised to be their biggest update to the software package yet, Adobe has released the public beta of Photoshop CS6, the first of the new programs to hit consumers. The beta, which can be downloaded for free from Adobe’s website (you’ll have to have an Adobe ID, though, to download and register the demo), clocks in at just under 1 GB and runs on all multi-core Intel-based Macs with 1 GB or more of RAM installed (click on the image below to be linked).

This post is part of a series that revisits some of our readers’ favorite articles from the past that still contain awesome and relevant information that you might find useful. This post was originally published on March 31st, 2011.

It’s a problem we’ve all faced. You’re happily listening to a podcast or song when the phone rings or someone interrupts you. The track is paused, you deal with the distraction, and then get back to work. Only half an hour later do you realise that you never hit play again!

Although this isn’t an earth-shattering problem, a simple utility to combat this seemed like a great idea to me – especially one produced by the super-talented Iconfactory team.

Their Take Five application has been available on the iPhone for a little while, and today makes its debut on the Mac platform. Let’s take a look and see how it works.


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