Currently Browsing

General
X-Mirage: The Simplest Way to Record Your iOS Apps in Action

AirPlay is built into iOS and OS X these days, making it simple to mirror anything on any of your devices to your Apple TV. Oddly, though, there’s no built-in way to steam your iOS screen to a Mac using AirPlay, even though the 27” iMac might as well be a TV at that size.

As is so often the case, there’s an app for that. There’s AirServer, the tool that, once installed, lives in your Mac’s Preferences and makes it easy to stream from iOS to your Mac, and Reflector, which makes it look like you’ve actually got an iOS device on your Mac screen. Then, there’s the brand-new X-Mirage that aims to be the best tool both for AirPlay streaming and one-touch recording of anything on your iOS device screen.

Keep reading to see how it stacks up to the competition, and to get a chance to win one of 5 copies of X-Mirage.

(more…)

MediaHuman Audio Converter: A Free Tool to Encode Music

Not every device prefers to use M4A as its main audio format. Some situations call for an MP3 file, and sometimes even something outlandish like OGG. The App Store is full of “free” music converters that either don’t work or have an abundance of ads. After researching things a bit, I discovered a quality alternative to anything available in the App Store. It’s MediaHuman’s Audio Converter, one of the few freeware apps with an appealing user interface. The question is, does it perform as well as the paid apps? Let’s find out. (more…)

The Technology and Touchscreen Divide

It was a tuesday, and since I got home from the office early that day, I decided to pop into my son’s daycare to take him home. As I open the door, I see him (wearing a fireman’s hat) with two other boys, all crowded around a PC screen. They keep touching the CRT and my son says, “It’s broken.”

The touchscreen — and more specifically, the popularity of the iPhone and iPad — have changed the way we interact with technology. A few years ago, Steve Jobs was insistent that touchscreen computers just weren’t going to take off. But my three-year-old boy says different. And I think he might be right.

Read the rest of the post at iPad.AppStorm.net

Thanks to Our Sponsor: ReadKit

Tired of having your RSS feeds, longform articles, and bookmarks spread across different apps and services? ReadKit is the reading app you need. It’s the app to keep all of your reading in one place.

ReadKit is the perfect post-Google Reader RSS reader for the Mac, with built-in native RSS sync and full-featured support for all of the best new RSS reader services, including Feedly, Fever, NewsBlur, Feed Wrangler, and Feedbin. You can then add your reading later services — including Instapaper, Pocket, and Readability — and bookmarks from Pinboard and Delicious, and keep everything together in one app. It’s easy to find everything you want to read, with Smart Folders and search, and simple to make your reading experience just the way you want with 4 beautiful themes and the reading font and size of your choice.

readkit_spon

Want more than just reading? ReadKit’s got you covered, with rich integration with all of your favorite sharing and bookmarking services. It’s even got one-click Evernote saving, so you can build an archive of your favorite articles to easily find them later.

ReadKit is our AppStorm RSS and reading app of choice, one we gave a 10/10 rating in our most recent review. We’re pretty sure you’ll love it.

Get a Copy of ReadKit Today!

ReadKit is the RSS and reading later app you need. It’s just $6.99 on the Mac App Store, a steal for everything it offers. Go get your copy today, and start enjoying the best reading experience the Mac has to offer!

Think you’ve got a great app? Sign up for a Weekly Sponsorship slot just like this one.
The Sky is Not Falling: The Realmac Team on App Pricing

The App Store made buying software something normal people do again — but almost as quickly, it’s seemingly turned into a marketplace of free apps paid for by in-app purchases. Marco Arment of Instapaper fame has argued that “Paid-up-front iOS apps had a great run, but it’s over”, while Joe Cieplinski, the developer behind Teleprompt+, argues that “there is a whole world of untapped potential on the App Store for developers who can solve real problems for people who are happy to pay.” I’ve always sided with the latter argument that paid apps will never die, but it only takes a few minutes of browsing the App Store to see that freemium apps have seriously encroached on the domains previously held by paid apps.

Are paid apps dead, or not — and is this just about iOS, or is it the same on the Mac? To answer that, we’ve talked with Nik Fletcher, product manager at Realmac Software, about their team’s experiences with app pricing and sales on both the iOS and Mac App Store. Realmac has recently faced backlash on the iOS App Store over Clear+’s pricing, but at the same time decided not to run discounts on their pro Mac apps, so they have a unique perspective on both markets.

To them, there’s a bright future for carefully considered in-app purchases and paid pro software. Here’s the interview:

(more…)

Win a Copy of the SuperStacked Mac Bundle from AppStorm!

We’ve closed our giveaway; congrats to our winners Emanuel and Eddy!

Bundles started out as a great way to get a ton of apps for a cheap price. Then, thanks to the Humble Bundles, paying what you want for a bundle got popular. Now, this week’s bundle from StackSocial lets you get a huge bundle of apps, design resources, and subscriptions for a cheaper price if you buy it early during the bundle promotion.

For $35 today — but $50 if you wait until the last day of the bundle — you can get a copy of xScope, Corel Painter Lite, CSS Hat, Pixa, skEdit, and more in the SuperStacked Mac Bundle. You’ll also get a set of Photoshop and iOS app design templates, two beautiful sets of thin vector icons great for modern designs, and the entire Growth Hacker Bundle with subscriptions to web apps like MOZ, Stride, HitTail, and more. That’s a lot of stuff to get for that price, especially if you’re planning on launching a new side-business where the design tools and web apps would come in handy.

medium_finalmainframe

And, best of all, we’ve got two copies of the SuperStacked Mac bundle to giveaway to our readers. Just leave a comment below and let us know what you want most from this bundle to enter — and then share the post on your social networks and leave a new comment with a link to your social post for an extra entry in the giveaway. Best of all, if you really want the bundle, go ahead and buy it now — and if you win, you’ll get reimbursed in full for the bundle!

Hurry and get your entry in — we’re closing our giveaway on Friday, October 18th!

Envato staff or those who have written more than two articles or tutorials for AppStorm are ineligible to enter.

MacPaint is Back at Long Last with Cloudpaint

Flat design is all the rage these days, but back in 1984, flat was all there was. And back then, the Mac shipped with an acclaimed paint application: MacPaint. The legendary app showed the world that computers could, indeed, be the bicycle for the mind that Steve Jobs wanted so desperately.

Today’s TextEdit was the successor to Mac OS Classic’s SimpleEdit, but MacPaint never got a 21st century upgrade. That is, until now. Cloudpaint is a new web app that nearly perfectly replicates MacPaint in any modern browser — and it’s a ton of fun to play with. (more…)

When In-App Purchases Aren’t Bad

In-App Purchases have earned quite the bad reputation since they were first introduced to the App Store with iOS 3 in 2009. Their addition to the Mac App Store was met with dread and foreboding that it’d spell the end of quality paid apps in the wake of freemium apps filled with ridiculous in-app purchases. That hasn’t happened on the Mac yet, but on iOS, it seems like the traditional paid market is eroded more and more every day by free apps with in-app purchases.

The bad reputation is undeserved, though. I’m as critical of apps with in-app purchases as anyone could be — their very presence on free apps makes me skip the app by default unless it looks very impressive otherwise. But they don’t have to be bad.

Right now, the Mac App Store has escaped the worst of the race to the bottom in app pricing, in large part thanks to the fact that Mac developers can still distribute free trials to their apps on their own sites. It’s on the iPhone and iPad that in-app purchases have taken over, with a vengeance. Smartphone apps, perhaps, aren’t the best thing to compare to Mac apps, but iPad apps surely are fairly easily to compare, since many people today use iPads as laptop replacements. If in-app purchases are to be the future of app sales — especially on the Mac — they’d better be done right, and the best iPad apps with in-app purchases today are the best examples of how in-app purchases can be done well.

Paid apps aren’t dead, but in-app purchases are still going to be a big part of the app discussion going forward. Here’s what they need to make them work in a way that’s equal to or better than the traditional paid app market.

(more…)

Stuck On Earth: Explore the World Through Beautiful Photos

Trey Ratcliff is one of the most respected people in professional photography today. He pioneered the use of HDR (high dynamic range) to capture scenes in a lifelike way; he also writes one of the most detailed and well-composed tutorials for HDR on the Internet. Ratcliff is also known for some other side projects, like Stuck On Earth, a previously iPad-only app for exploring the world through photographs.

Ratcliff’s handy tool is now available on the Mac, and I’m going to take a look at how it fares in comparison to the iPad app. (more…)

Thanks to Our Sponsor: VideoGet for Mac

You’ve got Pocket and Instapaper if you want to save articles to read offline, but what if you want to save videos to watch offline? After all, watching the YouTube and Vimeo videos you’ve planned to watch later is impossible when you’re offline, and terribly annoying if your internet connection is slow. That’s why you need a copy of VideoGet for Mac.

VideoGet for Mac lets you download videos from YouTube, Vimeo, and hundreds of other sites without any more effort than saving an article to your reading later service. Just copy the link to your video, add it to VideoGet, and select what format you want to save your video in. You’ll find detailed settings for your saved video format, resolution, and quality so you can save space on your Mac or watch videos on any device you want.

screenshot_mac

VideoGet’s a simple tool that makes it easy to watch your favorite online videos anytime, even if your internet connection is down. It’s built by the same team as Mac Product Key Finder, and is just as simple to use.

Give VideoGet for Mac a Try This Week!

Got some YouTube videos you want to watch offline on your Mac? Go download a free trial of VideoGet for Mac and see how easy it can be to save them to watch later. You can download 20 full videos for free with the trial version, then get your own copy for $24.95 to save as many videos as you want for offline viewing.

Think you’ve got a great app? Sign up for a Weekly Sponsorship slot just like this one.
Page 8 of 163« First...678910...203040...Last »