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It’s hard to throw a stone without hitting a new to-do list app for the Mac. From Apple’s Reminders app to the new, iPhone inspired apps like Clear to the old, trusty workhorse apps like Omnifocus and Things, there’s a million ways to get things done on your Mac.

The thing is, we all need different things from to-do list apps. I personally used a plain text file (with TaskPaper or any plain text editor) for the longest time to keep track of everything I needed to do, before it became too hard to keep up with the tasks that have deadlines. I then switched to Omnifocus, and rely on it to make sure I don’t miss anything I need to do. I still like using plain text files for to-dos, though, and also have taken to using Clear to keep up with lists of random things that don’t matter as much (say, apps I want to try or movies I want to watch).

There’s far too many to-do list apps to list in a poll, so I thought instead we’d just ask what apps you use to keep up with your todos. We’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments below!

There’s so many Mac apps these days, it’s impossibly to use all of them. Odds are your Launchpad is filled with apps that you seldom or never use anymore. From apps you might have picked up while they were free or on sale to apps that you replaced with an alternate, it’s rather easy to quit using apps without even really thinking about it.

I’ve personally quit using several apps this year. Once Tweetbot for Mac came out, I pretty much quit using all other Twitter apps on the Mac, and only use Tweetbot online occasionally to schedule tweets. I’ve also quit using almost every other writing app I have installed other than iA Writer and Sublime Text, because no matter how many I try out I always come back to those two for writing and coding, respectively. Then, I quit using the Read Later for Mac app with Instapaper when Pocket for Mac was released, and comically that made me switch the web and iOS app I was using for web reading as well.

How about you? What apps have you quit using this year? This time, you’ll have to leave a comment to let us know!

‘Tis the season to drive around town buying presents, travel hours to see relatives, to try to keep from being the Grimp while muttering Bah, humbug! under your breath. In all seriousness, the holidays are a great time to relax, stay away from email and your desk, and focus on spending time with your family.

If you’re like most of us, your Mac is the machine you use to get work done, and you’d be just as glad to get rid of it for a few days while you unwind. But then, your Mac can be a nice companion on trips and during holiday parties, giving you an easy way to play festive music, throw pictures together into a movie, and more. iOS devices are great for that too, but sometimes its nice to have a full computer at your disposal.

That’s why we’re wondering: when you travel for the holidays, does your Mac come along too? Or are you just as glad to leave it at home and get a few rare days that you’re not in front of the computer? We’d love to hear your thoughts!

Last year, one of the newest features Apple announced for the iOS and iPhoto was Photo Stream, a simple way to get the pictures you take on the go on your Mac. If you have an iPhone and take pictures all the time, but want to keep them on your Mac, it’s a great service … provided you don’t take more than 1000 pictures before syncing with your Mac.

It’s an interesting way to keep your pictures synced along with the rest of your files with iCloud, but most of us have many different ways we sync data already. From Dropbox and other online storage apps to social networks where we usually share photos directly already, there’s a ton of ways to get your pictures off your phone without syncing or using Photo Stream.

More interesting, though, is that Photo Stream could work just between two Macs, or a Mac and a PC with iCloud installed. That way, your most recently imported photos are on all of your devices, even if you don’t have an iPhone.

So do you use Photo Stream on your Mac? Do you find it very useful, or could you just as easily use something else? We’d love to hear your thoughts below.

Optical Disks are rapidly going the way of cassette tapes, zip disks, floppies, and every other form of removable storage we’ve used over the years. Yes, CDs, DVDs, and Blu-ray disks are still important, but they’re far from the most important thing for computer users today. We watch movies and listen to music online or download them from the iTunes store, we download programs from the App Store and games from Steam, and we backup and share files with Dropbox, iCloud, and dozens of other online backup services.

CD and DVD drives are annoying at best. They break more often than not (yes, I’ve seen over a half-dozen DVD drives break over the past several years), and keeping your disks scratch-free is an exercise in futility. Then you have to keep the disks around just in case you ever want to rip that song or install that program again.

That said, DVDs are still rather useful, if for nothing else than watching movies. Downloads are great, but when your internet connection is slow or the discount section at the store beats iTunes prices, the trusty old DVD still serves its purpose. That’s why I own a Samsung external DVD drive to use along with my MacBook Air (I know, Samsung and Apple, sitting together on my desk…).

How about you? Do you use an external DVD drive, or have you kicked disks to the curb as Apple has started dropping DVD drives from its latest Macs? We’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments below!

At the end of last year, it looked like Apple just might release a TV in 2012. Our readers were skeptical, but still, many indicators seemed to point in that direction. But here we stand, with the year all but past, and unless Apple decides to release something in the next 4 weeks, 2012 will end without a TV from Apple.

That is, except for the Apple TV. No, Apple doesn’t make a TV itself, but its $99 set top box just might be the handiest little device you can hook up to your TV. Steve Jobs referred to it as a hobby, but it’s been a hobby Apple keeps coming back to. It’s more affordable than ever, so tiny you’ll hardly notice it in your living room, and with AirPlay and a Mac or iOS device, it can be the simplest way to show off a presentation or play a game on the big screen.

That’s why we’re wondering if you have an Apple TV. If so, do you ever use it with your Mac via AirPlay, or do you just use it to play online and iTunes media on your TV? Or is an Apple TV on your Christmas wish list? We’d love to hear your thoughts on Apple’s non-TV in the comments below.

When you’re always looking for the greatest new app, sometimes you forget about the awesome apps that power your life. The apps you use day in, day out to make money, stay in touch with family and friends, be creative, stay informed, and more are the most important apps, way more important that that new app that might come out tomorrow and just might revolutionize your life … or not.

Funny thing is, apps that you use all the time can fade into the background, and you’ll almost never think about them. It’s easy to take for granted the apps we use most. From your web browser to tools like Dropbox and Alfred or the launcher of your choice, there are apps you use every day without thinking about it, but you’d be hard pressed to live without them.

Today’s Thanksgiving in America, which makes a great time to stop and think of the things you’re grateful for, no matter where you call home. Our team has rounded up some of the apps we’re thankful for this year, and we’d love to hear from you. What Mac apps are you the most thankful to have around this year? Perhaps an older app that’s stood the test of time, or a newer app that’s recently become essential to your workflow. Either way, we’d love to hear about it in the comments below!

It’s been nearly 4 months since OS X Mountain Lion was released, and millions of Mac users around the world have already upgraded. Many of us upgraded our Macs as soon as it was in the App Store, while others were running it weeks earlier thanks to Apple’s developer program.

Mountain Lion brought many nice new features to OS X, from the Notifications Center and social network features to new apps like Reminders and Notes. Unfortunately, the new upgrade also left behind some older Macs, and many still don’t like the addition of more iCloud and iOS features in OS X.

I personally have been very pleased with Mountain Lion, and found the upgrade to be a great new change, but not everyone feels the same. That’s why we’re wondering: 4 months into the upgrade cycle, have you switched to Mountain Lion? Or are you still using Lion?

Is the cat that’s currently powering your Mac enough for your needs? We’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments below!

It sure is frustrating when an app you love gets sidelined by its developers. From the recent demise of Twitter for Mac, Sparrow being bought out by Google and promptly sidelined for Gmail.com, and Read Later being turned into Pocket for Mac and leaving Instapaper support behind, I’ve had a number of apps in my own workflow that have been abandoned lately.

It’s a normal problem we all face, and it’s not surprising at all when lite apps and games don’t get updated. But when something we rely on gets abandoned, it can be far more frustrating. You’re left with the option of continuing to rely on an app that might break with a future OS X update, or searching for something else that might fit the bill.

For me, I’ve given Pocket for Mac a shot, switching away from Instapaper for a trial run. I’ve bought Tweetbot, as I’d already been using its beta for months. But I’m still using Sparrow, as there’s no other mail app that works as good for me. I’m sure hoping something else better will come along before it gets abandoned for good.

How about you?

This morning, I woke up to a Reeder full of articles about Apple’s new announcements in yesterday’s keynote. Living in Asia makes it a bit tough to watch keynotes live, and Apple usually doesn’t even stream them live online. After reading through the articles and checking through Apple.com, I didn’t really feel the need to watch the full keynote. I enjoy watching Apple’s product launches, but this one felt like one I could skip. Incidentally, it turned into a very exciting keynote for Mac users, with new iMacs and Mac Minis, but still, I could find what I needed to know from Apple.com’s pages.

That said, I’ve watched tons of Apple keynotes over the years, especially while Jobs was still alive and doing his magic on stage. I’ve gone back and rewatched portions of old keynotes to see how Apple’s changed (ouch, the fonts in old keynotes hurts to look at), and listening to Jobs’ speeches from when he first came back to Apple gives a unique perspective on the company.

So how about you? Do you always watch Apple’s keynotes, or do you just pick choice ones to watch? Or have you never watched an keynote before (is that even possible)? We’d love to hear your thoughts below!

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