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I’m just getting to the end of my sixteenth year of using email. In this time, I’ve used around twenty different email addresses and have usually operated several accounts at once. Email accumulates incredibly quickly and I, as I’m sure many of you to, have many thousands of email messages on my MacBook.

For years I did what most of us do: stored messages in various well-pruned folders. I then moved to rely on Gmail’s labels and its awesome search capabilities. Eventually I moved on from Gmail to FastMail, started using Mailtags, and took the step of tagging my messages, getting rid of folders, and dumping everything into a single archive. Sadly, Mailtags hasn’t quite made the jump to Snow Leopard yet (and I’ve had problems with the beta), so I’m waiting for a full and final update to be released. Until that happy day, I’ve been pleased to spend the last week experimenting with Rocketbox, and I can see this little app becoming a fixture in my email workflow.

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Many of us have more than one web browser on our Mac – I have copies of Safari, Firefox, Opera, Camino, Google Chrome and various others. Although I certainly don’t use them all regularly (Safari is my browser of choice), I do open them all occasionally to try out new features and test the appearance of a website.

If you regularly use different browsers, manually opening them and copy-and-pasting links into specific ones can become frustrating. You can only have one “default browser” on OS X, and there’s no easy way to quickly specify which particular one to use at any given time.

Today’s How-To will be introducing an application called Choosy, which helps to make running multiple browsers far more enjoyable.

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With cloud storage becoming more popular, cost effective, and accessible, many different tools and services seem to be cropping up in the market almost every week. Dropbox remains one of the most popular services available (and we’re big fans of it at Mac.AppStorm!).

If you are not familiar with Dropbox, it’s probably worth reading our article “Delving Deeper Into Dropbox” before you continue.

A few weeks ago, Dropbox revealed their iPhone application to make your file syncing life even easier. It’s completely free, and available from App Store. Today I’ll be walking you through the setup process, and explaining what the mobile Dropbox app is capable of.

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A relative minnow in the so-called “Browser Wars”, Camino released their Version 2.0 browser last week. Based on the Gecko rendering engine from Mozilla, Camino has been designed exclusively for the Mac in order to take advantage of all the APIs and services native to Mac OS X.

Personally I never saw a reason to use Camino 1.x, I had Safari for speed, Firefox for web development and Opera for compatibility testing. However, with the new release, and my Firefox install being a little slow and bloated, I migrated to Camino for a week. Today’s review will take a look at the different features in Camino 2.0 and whether or not it’s worth making the switch.

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We all know and love Dropbox, the amazing online file storage, backup, syncing and sharing service. It allows you to keep all of your computers in perfect harmony, your documents, music and more in each location.

That’s great, but what if you wanted to remotely control a computer, synchronize passwords, or sync your to-do lists? Dropbox offers a range of extra functionality that isn’t immediately obvious, and today we’ll be showing you how to achieve some of this interesting functionality!

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Facebook is a great service for keeping in touch with friends and sharing photos, though I do sometimes wish that an easy method existed for backing up all that data locally. Keeping photos, messages and comments in “the cloud” is a great system, but no system is infallable.

I was enthusiastic to try SocialSafe – a simple $2.99 backup utility for downloading all your Facebook content – friends, photos (both that you have uploaded and those you’re tagged in), and your profile. This review will take a look at how the process works, and the benefits of having access to all your Facebook information offline.

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If you’re anything like me, you have a few different email accounts and a fairly large backlog of archived messages. Storing several thousand emails can gradually introduce problems – either from your mail client slowing down, or through concern over all your information being held remotely with a service such as Gmail.

I have recently started experimenting with MailSteward as a method of archiving and backing up email. It can significantly speed up your mail client, make moving computers easier, and offer greater peace of mind.

This how-to will walk you through the basic process of setting up MailSteward, archiving messages, and searching them at a later date.

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How annoying is it when all of your friends use different types of instant messaging networks? Some use AIM, some MSN, Yahoo! – the list goes on. It can be a real nuisance to have multiple applications and windows open just to keep up the communication.

There are of course applications such as Adium to allow multiple accounts, however many Mac users prefer iChat’s simplistic interface (myself included). In this tutorial I will show you how to set up iChat so that you can keep all of your contacts in one simple window – whether they’re on AIM, MSN, Yahoo, or any other network.

Whilst this isn’t the simplest of tasks, once completed you should never have to worry about it again.

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One of the lesser known features of networking in OS X is the ability to share an ethernet connection via Wi-Fi. Essentially turning your Mac into a wireless access point, it can provide a great way to share an internet connection with other computers or a mobile device.

This how-to will walk you through the process from start to finish, and outline a few of the more advanced features available for configuring the wireless network.

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One of Mail’s most powerful features is not immediately obvious, and rarely used to it’s full potential. This feature is called “rules” and can be found hidden within the application’s preferences. Rules basically allow you to tell Mail what to do when certain things happen – moving email between folders, adding colours, or automatically sending a response.

Here, I will explain what rules are capable of, and how do use them to make the most of your email client. The article will also outline a few novel examples, including the ability to send your computer to sleep via a simple email.

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