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It’s already been established that the top three video game consoles can do a lot more than just play games. The PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 and Nintendo Wii can all act as media hubs and extenders to stream videos, music and photos stored on your Mac.

Streaming content isn’t all that new, but it’s popularity and adoption amongst a wider range of consumers is becoming noticeable. Whether it’s streaming music from the Web or listening to your iTunes playlists remotely, the method of delivering the stuff you want is getting easier to grasp. The best part is that you don’t need much more than some neat software, a home network and, naturally, content you want to enjoy.

What you need to make sure of before you initiate all this is that your game console is connected to your home network, through Ethernet or Wi-Fi. Once the Mac and the console are on the same network, the rest should be easy.

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What a great service YouTube is. It’s all too easy to lose sight of how revolutionary it was when it first launched. It broke all kinds of rules and expectations of how we watch video, and how we relate to its distribution. It opened up broadcasting, allowing anybody at all with a video recording device to easily and quickly make their videos available to anybody, anywhere.

YouTube also did something curious to how we consume news: just about any story that hits the headlines is likely to have an accompanying video on YouTube. Remember when Michael Jackson died? It didn’t take long for recordings of the ambulance leaving his home to start popping up on YouTube. For many of us, YouTube’s become a frontline news service – along with Twitter.

Unfortunately, YouTube is far from perfect. From the small-minded, snarky comments, right through to the frustrating use of Flash. Nowadays I rarely visit YouTube at all, and when I do, it’s just to get a URL for a video, or to jump from that page to a different service.

Our site is well-known for its long lists of tips and app recommendations. This article is different: I’m going to recommend just three ways to make YouTube better.

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Live Interior 3D Pro is a powerful and feature-rich application for designing and building both the interior and basic exterior of a home. Though the graphics are by no means photorealistic, there are some primitive rendering capabilities that make it fairly easy to create impressive images.

This review will give a quick breakdown of the UI and features available in Live Interior 3D Pro and conclude with a few thoughts on the strengths and weaknesses of the application.

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Today I’ll walk you through the potentially frightening process of upgrading your Mac’s performance through increasing your RAM. We’ll start with a brief discussion of what RAM is and why you should upgrade, before taking you through every step of the upgrade process so you can be confident you’re doing everything right.

This article will help anyone looking to upgrade their RAM but is especially targeted at computer hardware novices. Many of the steps I will go through are to simplify the process of finding the right RAM for your Mac and can be completely skipped if you already know what you need and where to get it. Let’s get started!

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Imagine your files and folders sitting in a Finder window. It’s simple, and there’s no clutter. The only information you have about them is the name underneath. Of course we both know that there’s more to learn about each file. Much more!

Picture that all the “metadata” for a file or folder is engraved on it – unique – just like our finger prints. You’d need a magnifying glass to see it all. Let me introduce you to your magnifying glass: the “Get Info” Pane.

In this article I’ll introduce you to it, take you through a tour, and give some helpful hints along the way.

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Kids and computers go together like peanut butter and jelly. Or like crayons and white-painted walls… My point is that kids start using computers earlier and earlier, and many of them become very adept and quite precocious at an extremely young age.

There are significant dangers out there: the online world is a new place to be concerned about what your kids are up to, and we’ve all heard too many stories already of youngsters getting into trouble online. Happily, your Mac comes with a few bits of protection built in, and there are some good applications available to help you extend those controls.

I’m going to talk you through three different ways that you can go about putting in place better online safety precautions: via OS X’s built-in Parental Controls, with an external application, and by getting to the heart of how your computer interfaces with the internet, by taking control of your DNS settings.

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Alfred is the latest application to add to an ever-expanding set of “quick launch” apps. So is there room for another? Definitely. Alfred has been designed with the casual user in mind and makes finding files and searching the net a whole lot faster and easier.

This review will take a deeper look at Alfred, developed by “The Alfred Team”, and share a few competing launchers for you to consider.

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As more online web apps such as Flickr, Delicious, and Gmail adopt the filing system of tags over a folder structure, tagging is growing more and more popular as a way to keep hoards of digital files organized.

Tags, from Gravity Applications makes tagging files universally across your Mac a breeze. This review will look into how Tags can help you keep track of your files, and why you should be tagging.

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I’m just getting to the end of my sixteenth year of using email. In this time, I’ve used around twenty different email addresses and have usually operated several accounts at once. Email accumulates incredibly quickly and I, as I’m sure many of you to, have many thousands of email messages on my MacBook.

For years I did what most of us do: stored messages in various well-pruned folders. I then moved to rely on Gmail’s labels and its awesome search capabilities. Eventually I moved on from Gmail to FastMail, started using Mailtags, and took the step of tagging my messages, getting rid of folders, and dumping everything into a single archive. Sadly, Mailtags hasn’t quite made the jump to Snow Leopard yet (and I’ve had problems with the beta), so I’m waiting for a full and final update to be released. Until that happy day, I’ve been pleased to spend the last week experimenting with Rocketbox, and I can see this little app becoming a fixture in my email workflow.

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If you are anything like me, you have scraps of paper lying around with dates, times, and names all over the place. Hopefully, you aren’t relying mainly on your head to keep yourself on-time and in the right location. Maybe you are stuck in the world of iCal misery, with syncing problems and duplicating events.

This is where BusyCal from BusyMac proves to be something of a lifesaver. If you are familiar with iCal, the transition to BusyCal shouldn’t be too difficult. Plus, you will enjoy some added bonuses such as powerful synchronization tools and live data built into the Month view.

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