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It’s becoming evermore common to have multiple computers in the home or office, and even more so to have them sitting next to each other. However, problems arise when you’ve got certain files stored on one, others on another, and when you move between them, you have to change keyboard and mouse. Wouldn’t it be great if your mouse could just zoom between computers?

Teleport, a free preference-pane application from Abyssoft solves this problem by allowing you to use one mouse and keyboard with multiple computers. This how-to will guide you through the settings of Teleport and show you how to make the most out of this great application.


Sharing files between computers has become far easier in recent years with tools such as Dropbox making the process a breeze. Today I’ll be taking a look at a different type of system, for easily publishing specific types of content and sharing a URL immediately.

Droplr is currently an invite-only service, so this is very much a quick “preview” of the functionality on offer. If you’d like to be one of the first to use the new application, enter your details on the site to sign up for an invite code.


While you sit in front of your screen for hours on end, perusing tech blogs and pretending not to be addicted to Facbook, are you considering what sort of impact you’re having on the environment!? If you’re like me, the answer is “Hey pal, it’s a computer not a Hummer. Back off.” Luckily however, the good folks at Apple have put a lot of time and effort into this problem for us.

In honor of Blog Action Day we’ll be taking a look into what makes Apple one of the greenest technology companies you’ll find by examining the actions that they are taking to reduce their carbon footprint in the areas of manufacturing, transportation, product use, recycling, and facilities.


Think you know everything there is to know about OS X? Here’s a list of secret features and shortcuts known only by the most elite nerds. Test your knowledge and see if you are a good candidate to stand at the Genius Bar and wear a clever T-shirt.

We’ll start with some simple features before moving on to the more obscure. Topics covered include downloading YouTube videos using Safari, accessing an entire second clipboard, placing widgets on your desktop, and taking control of your system volume!


Automator is an incredibly handy automation assistant for OS X. Instead of writing lines of code as in AppleScript, Automator allows you to string together preset actions through an easy to use drag-and-drop interface. The result is no-brainer automation on the fly.

This tutorial will cover a number of basic Automator features including how to work with application-specific actions, creating variables, embedding AppleScripts, and recording custom actions. Let’s get going!


There are some cases where certain files open in applications not well suited for the current task at hand.

Personally, this happens to me when I create JPGs in Photoshop. Mac OS X naturally wants to open it up in Photoshop. Surely Photoshop can open it (it did create it after all), but for preview purposes it can be a slow process. Opening the file in Preview, on the other hand, can offer a much quicker solution.

Enter DefaultApp, a preference pane that makes system wide default app changes. You no longer have to set the preferred application for each individual file you create. Just set it up once, and forget about ever setting it up. It’s that simple.


Facebook is a great service for keeping in touch with friends and sharing photos, though I do sometimes wish that an easy method existed for backing up all that data locally. Keeping photos, messages and comments in “the cloud” is a great system, but no system is infallable.

I was enthusiastic to try SocialSafe – a simple $2.99 backup utility for downloading all your Facebook content – friends, photos (both that you have uploaded and those you’re tagged in), and your profile. This review will take a look at how the process works, and the benefits of having access to all your Facebook information offline.


Many Mac users likely haven’t even opened this application before, and those that have were probably scared off by all the numbers and confusing words. I certainly was. But if you understand how it works and what it can be used for, Activity Monitor can be a great way of keeping an eye on what’s going on inside your computer.

This how-to will explain all the ins and outs of Activity Monitor, and how to get the most out of it. It will also give you some tips on how to speed up your computer a bit.


If you’re anything like me, you have a few different email accounts and a fairly large backlog of archived messages. Storing several thousand emails can gradually introduce problems – either from your mail client slowing down, or through concern over all your information being held remotely with a service such as Gmail.

I have recently started experimenting with MailSteward as a method of archiving and backing up email. It can significantly speed up your mail client, make moving computers easier, and offer greater peace of mind.

This how-to will walk you through the basic process of setting up MailSteward, archiving messages, and searching them at a later date.


Apple first introduced the MacBook Air in 2008. Other than its thinness (and its ability to fit inside a manilla envelope) it brought a multi-touch trackpad, similar to the iPhone. Since then, the unibody MacBook and MacBook Pro have received the trackpad makeover. The trackpad seems very useful, and it is; when you are in a gesture-supported application. For me, my trackpad’s abilities fade into the background. Most of the apps I work in do not support them.

Until I discovered MultiClutch, a preference pane extension that lets you set up trackpad gestures for any application. In this tutorial I will show you the basics of setting up gestures in Multi Clutch, as well as some ideas for different uses.


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