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This post is part of a series that revisits some of our readers’ favorite articles from the past that still contain awesome and relevant information that you might find useful. This post was originally published on June 16th, 2011.

Do note: this video screencast is only in Flash, so you won’t be able to view it on your iOS device. Sorry!

In this, the next installment in our series on iMovie ’11, we’re going to take a look at adding assets to your iMovie projects. What do I mean by assets? Well, in truth, the video clips themselves could be considered assets. But we’ve already gone over how to add those to a project, and even how to splice them together to start to form a movie. What I call assets are anything you add to a movie that isn’t a video clip. I’m talking about images, audio, titles, transitions. All of those things that can help flesh out what would otherwise be just home movie footage into a work of film.

Ok, so maybe your plans aren’t quite that grandiose. But I think you get the idea. So, sit back and watch as I show you how to add these things in iMovie, and how they can take your next project to the next level.

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This post is part of a series that revisits some of our readers’ favorite articles from the past that still contain awesome and relevant information that you might find useful. This post was originally published on April 20th, 2011.

Do note: this video screencast is only in Flash, so you won’t be able to view it on your iOS device. Sorry!

Bundled with every new Mac is the iLife suite of apps. iLife promises an exciting and fulfilling digital experience, one that integrates your Mac into your day-to-day life. But having the program is only half the battle – the hardest part is knowing how to use it!

Today’s screencast overview will walk you through using iMovie for the first time, how to create your first project, and how to import in your video. Let’s get started!

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Whether you’re looking to do some late spring cleaning, or you just want to liberate some of your guilty pleasure movies from their DVD prisons, it is time we revisit the process of ripping your DVD collection into iTunes. Ripping DVDs is not only easy, it can save a lot of money as you begin (or continue) to build your digital video library.

As the self-proclaimed digital projectionist for the casa de la Stark, let me walk you through the basic steps and available software applications to get those movies off the plastic and into your Mac.

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In this day and age, everyone wants high-definiton content, and that means they either have to download the new 1080p video from iTunes or watch some Blu-Rays on their HDTV. Sadly, Macs still don’t sport Blu-Ray drives and probably never will, so why bother? Well, if you’ve already invested in lots of Blu-Ray films and TV shows, then it’s really not worth re-purchasing all your content on iTunes just to have it on your computer at the same resolution. I mean, there really should be a solution for this sort of thing.

And there is — sort of. You see, film producers decided that they would offer digital copies of their films with the physical copies. The only problem with this great idea is that many films do not include it and almost every TV show I know doesn’t, leaving the majority of what you own tied to your television and not playable on your Mac or Apple TV. Instead of fretting about this and going off to re-purcahse all your content on iTunes so that you can watch it on your iOS devices, Mac computers, and Apple TV, maybe you should consider ripping your Blu-Ray content. It’s not that hard to do actually, and I’m going to give you a full walkthrough, so join me after the break for some insight on getting all your high-definition content on your Mac.

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And here we are again, with another installment in the iMovie ’11 video tutorial series. Today we look at iMovie’s themes. Themes are a unique part of iMovie that really let you take your home movies to the next level. But there are a couple of tricks to be aware of when trying to make use of them yourself.

Let’s dive in!

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Recently we toured the interface of iMovie ‘11 in a screencast. This provided an overview of how to create a project in iMovie, and how to get your videos into your project. Today we’re back with something a little more in-depth!

In this video, we’re going to look at slicing, trimming, and editing your videos. I’ll show you how to go over your movie with a fine-toothed comb, making sure that you make those cuts right where you want them. By the end of this short tutorial, you’ll be on your way to becoming a video surgeon.

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The iPhone 4 was released this past June, and with that came a major iOS release. This new hardware and software presented some new possibilities and thus some new applications. The added front-facing camera was begging to be used in a video calling situation and Apple – being the innovators that they are – created FaceTime to utilize this new functionality.

A limiting factor for FaceTime was the fact that it was only functional for calling another iPhone 4 (or the latest iteration of the iPod touch). Last October, Apple released a beta version of FaceTime for Mac, utilising the iSight camera built into most of their notebook and desktop computers.

FaceTime for Mac recently hit the Mac App Store as a full 1.0 release, and today we’ll be taking the final version for a spin!

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Think about the sheer amount of media content you have stored on your Mac and any backup drives you have. Chances are, the combination of video, music and photos in your personal collection is staggering, but the real problem is sharing it with friends and family.

In an effort to offer a solution that can work on a variety of different Web-connected devices, an Israeli developer came up with Libox as a simpler method to uploading and sharing content without any storage limitations. The coolest part of the app is that it can do this easily with high-definition files as well. Let’s see how it all plays out.

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You don’t have to be a movie buff to appreciate a good foreign film, but unless you know the language, you will need to watch with subtitles. Adding them to your movies, TV shows and video files can be fairly easy, and you have a few options to do so.

The file format of the video usually doesn’t matter when it comes to adding subtitles, but naturally, playback is another story depending on how and where you want to watch it. If you’ve got a film that doesn’t have any subtitles at all, you can usually find them at websites like MovieSubtitles.org and AllSubs.org or by simply checking through a search engine. Subtitle file formats are typically found in .srt, .sub, .ssa, .ass and MicroDVD, and all of them should work with the options that I’ll outline here.

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What a great service YouTube is. It’s all too easy to lose sight of how revolutionary it was when it first launched. It broke all kinds of rules and expectations of how we watch video, and how we relate to its distribution. It opened up broadcasting, allowing anybody at all with a video recording device to easily and quickly make their videos available to anybody, anywhere.

YouTube also did something curious to how we consume news: just about any story that hits the headlines is likely to have an accompanying video on YouTube. Remember when Michael Jackson died? It didn’t take long for recordings of the ambulance leaving his home to start popping up on YouTube. For many of us, YouTube’s become a frontline news service – along with Twitter.

Unfortunately, YouTube is far from perfect. From the small-minded, snarky comments, right through to the frustrating use of Flash. Nowadays I rarely visit YouTube at all, and when I do, it’s just to get a URL for a video, or to jump from that page to a different service.

Our site is well-known for its long lists of tips and app recommendations. This article is different: I’m going to recommend just three ways to make YouTube better.

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