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In many ways it’s the holy grail of Mac apps. Apple has instilled an appreciation for the beautiful, the polished, and the carefully designed. And if there’s one part of our lives that screams out for an experience like that it’s money management.

I mean it makes sense, right? Computers are good with numbers, and people usually aren’t. Computers can be used to identify patterns and formulate projections, and people like to see patterns and projections. And on the Mac platform we should be able to get all of that lovely functionality wrapped up in an aesthetically pleasing package, right?

Well there’s a new contender that’s entered the fray: Koku. Making the rounds, Koku has attracted the attention of the Mac community. We’re all dying to know if someone new can build the type of financial monitoring app that we’ve all been looking for.

And so here we are. Let’s take a look at the areas that Koku excels in, and the spots where they need to do some work.


These days, you’d be hard-pressed to find any business, freelancer or consumer who doesn’t have a PayPal account, and for good reason – it’s quick, easy, and universally used. Considering its success, however, the PayPal website is still awkward to use –

If you leave it for more than a second, it would seem, it logs itself out, and you have to waste time logging back in again. Once you’re in, it’s not all that intuitive, and you have to navigate countless dropdown menus to do anything. In short, the PayPal site is a pain.

GaragePay can take away all of that pain. It’s a PayPal client for Mac, meaning you never have to use that pesky site ever again, and instead can handle all of your transactions from the comfort of a native app.


We’d probably all benefit from keeping better track of our money, and it’s always great to find a native Mac app to get the job done. It’s a difficult problem to solve, as we all manage money in our own unique way – budgeting, spending and income are highly individualized. As such, the selection of apps in this niche is similarly varied, with each having different feature sets and workflows.

iFinance is significantly cheaper than a lot of the other options out there, so let’s see if it can still get the job done!


The market for billing and payment apps is crowded with heavy, complex and hard to understand apps. It’s impressive how difficult app developers can make something as easy as reminding you of your due payments!

Don’t worry, though. If you are looking for an app that is lighter, faster and simpler, and still does a great job at keeping up with your bills, we have a great option for you.

It’s called Chronicle Mini and is created by the same people behind the excellent Chronicle. Read on to find out more!


For most people, the idea of having a simple, clear budget is appealing. We all want to know how much money we have to spend, and we’d all love to end up with more cash left over at the end of the month. But for people looking for a great app to help them track and manage their finances, the choices have been slim.

Thankfully, MoneyWell has come along, providing a financial management app that is easy to learn, easy to use, and full of features to get you in control of your money. Head past the break to learn more about this app, and maybe start the path to financial peace!


In my search for the ideal money management application, I keep coming back to iBank. I reviewed Jumsoft Money here on Mac.AppStorm a few months back, and mentioned a few other options I’ve tried. I wouldn’t say it’s perfect – there are important features that I can’t use, and others that I don’t make use of – but on the whole it’s been stable and easy to work with, and I’ve not yet found an alternative that beats it.

We reviewed the last version here a while back, but now IGG Software has released a major update, so it’s time to revisit iBank and let you know how it works and what you get for your money.


For a long time, I have been a very happy user of Microsoft Money. Since making the switch to a Mac, I’ve played the field, but still haven’t found a money management application that really meets my needs (or is fun enough to keep me coming back). There’s no going back – Microsoft announced last year that they would no longer be marketing Money, and they’re planning to stop support for it in January 2011.

The Mac programs I have tried include MoneyDance (very nice, and capable, but doesn’t really look like a Mac app), Cha-Ching (pretty, but simplistic and superficial), and iCompta (the quiet little guy at the back of the class, powerful and easy to use). The application I’ve used longest is iBank; having won several awards, it’s an excellent application. But I’m still not entirely satisfied.

I’ve known of Jumsoft’s Money for several years, and now and then given it a brief try, but never in much depth. Recently, I decided I really ought have a proper look at it – read on to see my conclusions.


I guess I should start this review off with an admission… when it comes to personal finances, I’m very lazy. So lazy that I never budget and therefore always end up a couple of days before payday with no money. I guess the reason behind this is that setting up a spreadsheet to forecast my financial situation does not appeal to me in the slightest.

However, when Cashculator dropped on my desk this month, I thought I should at least give budgeting a go, if only just to review the software. It turns out that Apparent Software have made a pretty decent little app.


Today, I’ll be taking a look at TimeNet, a long-standing player in the field of time tracking and project management. The application allows you to take control of your clients and projects, easily send invoices, and stay on top of who owes you what.

It offers a fairly simple window-based interface, to show you only the information you need at any given time. This makes it pleasant to navigate, and slightly different from more complex competitors.


After reviewing Cha-Ching a few weeks ago, I thought it was only fair to take a look at another popular financial application for the Mac: iBank. Although it doesn’t sport a cute piggy bank icon, iBank has an impressive feature set and an award-winning user interface design.

This review will provide an overview of the features offered by iBank, highlight how to import transactions, showcase a the graph functionality, and also explain how the application connects to MobileMe for backing up and accessing transactions on-the-go.


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