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Sometime last year, frustrated by the complexities of the majority of task-tracking and GTD apps on the Mac (I’m looking at you, OmniFocus), I spent some time exploring the software that’s already built into OS X. That is: To Dos and Notes in Mail.app, and those same To Dos in iCal.

I turned more of my information into Events in iCal. Deadlines and reminders, which in the past had been undated items linked to particular Projects in OmniFocus or Things, now became dated To Dos or Events.

This worked quite well for me, but I found that I wanted to have easier access to my calendar, without needing to keep iCal open all the time. I tried using Bjango’s excellent Organized), but in general I don’t use Dashboard, so an ordinary app suited me better.

I considered a few options, and the one I liked most was Second Gear Software’s Today. Read on for a walkthrough of the basic feature set.

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Apple’s Safari browser remains an incredibly popular choice for Mac users everywhere, and is highly regarded for keeping up to date with the latest advances in web technology. Personally, I use and love it for the simplicity offered – it’s fast, lean, and feels like a clutter-free window to the web.

On the first day of WWDC, Apple announced the release of Safari 5, the latest incarnation of their browser. Today we’ll be taking a quick look at what’s new, and whether it’s worth getting excited about.

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Kaleidoscope is an excellent little app from Made By Sofa that facilitates identifying changes that have been made in documents and images. It’s really pretty to boot.

The interface is remarkably innovative and the app works beautifully. Today we’ll go over specifically what Kaleidoscope does, how to use it, and how it performed during the review process. If you’ve ever needed to compare two files, this is a review not to be missed!

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Our sister site, iPhone.AppStorm, reviewed the iPhone version of Soulver back in March this year. When I read that piece, I was really taken with the app, though I didn’t think that I needed a calculator much in my day-to-day life. I also read the excellent piece by Marco Arment that’s linked in a note to the review, and that got me fascinated by the application’s user interface, and the subtly disruptive things it does with familiar expectations for how a calculator looks and works. So I took myself over to the App Store and paid my money.

And then I realised that, actually, I use a calculator just about every day at work – a grey little handheld number that’s always disappearing onto my colleague Mary’s desk. I lose track of the number of times I’ve had to re-enter a column of numbers to check I’d got them right, and the number of times my sum turned out different on each of two or three checks.

So I started using my iPhone and Soulver for doing these calculations, and found the ability to check and refer back to previous lines invaluable.

I knew that Soulver began life as a desktop app (actually, quite a long time ago: you can read more about the history of the app in this 2006 press release), so I had to download that and see if it was as good as the iPhone app. I got in touch with the developer, and learned that they were soon to release a new version, Soulver 2. Well, that happy day has come, and here’s a quick walkthrough…

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Pagico Professional is a task management application that is much more than a simple GTD app. In contrast to the trendy to do applications that have arisen lately that purposely stay lean on features, Pagico targets professionals with complicated workflows by piling on the possibilities and integration options.

Today we’ll go over how to use Pagico’s major features as well as whether or not we think it’s worth your time to download and try for yourself.
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I’m a firm believer in the benefits of journalling and writing every day. Julia Cameron’s book, “The Artist’s Way” has been very significant in my life, and after reading it for the first time, I kept up the central practice she recommends – of writing three pages first thing every morning – almost every day for the following five years. For the past few months, I’ve fallen out of the habit, but I know I will pick it up again in time, and that I will most likely continue to keep a journal of some kind for the rest of my life.

I’ve always preferred pen or pencil on paper for this kind of writing, but I thought it might be time to have a go with one of the several journaling apps available for the Mac. I’ve gone straight to Mémoires, an app produced by Coding Robots, whose YouTube viewer, Cathodique, we included in our piece on improving YouTube.

Like Cathodique, Mémoires is a well-focused application: it does one thing, with minimal fuss or distraction. And yet it does that single thing well enough that it makes one take note. Join us after the jump for a quick walkthrough of Mémoires’ main features.

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How many times have you wished you could easily backup your data on-site or onto a remote server? Parachute is a simplistic backup application that is designed to compliment Time Machine with features that allow you to back up locally and remotely. On top of this you can set the scheduling of the backups as well as ‘smart backups’ (similar system to Time Machine).

The most obvious reason for backing up to a remote location is if your computer/hard drive become damaged or stolen. However it’s always a good idea to have a ‘second backup’ – better to be safe than sorry right?

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Steam, the popular PC gaming network from Valve, recently released a Mac client. Is this the beginning of the gaming revolution that Mac users have waited years to see or yet another disappointment? Read on to find out!

Today we’ll poke around the application a little, discuss how Steam for Mac performs relative to its PC counterpart and end with a brief look at a few of the games currently available.

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It seems fairly clear now that Google has won the RSS war. There aren’t many serious contenders for the title now that Newsgator has closed down their own aggregators and shifted their users over to Google Reader. Bloglines, though it has a pretty good web interface, seems to have suffered by comparison.

There are of course other options out there (Fever is a favourite among the more tech savvy), but of these three who were a while ago the main contenders, Google seems to have come out with the greatest number of users and the most rapidly developing platform.

Today we’ll be taking a look at a desktop companion to the Google Reader juggernaut. Gruml is a relatively new RSS reader for the Mac that syncs well with the service, and offers plenty of customisation options. Join us after the jump for a quick tour of its main features.

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Over the past few months, I have become more and more interested in photography, and more specifically, organizing the hundreds and hundreds of photos I’ve taken. However, each time I head out for a Digital SLR filled adventure, I find myself feeling more and more disorganized. Dozens of pictures for a family birthday party and night out with friends still sit on my SD card, waiting to be imported. Why, you ask, have I neglected to do this? I don’t know where to put them!

Sure, many Mac users love and live for iPhoto. However, for me, it feels like a step back. This is why I’ve looked at moving upwards to a prosumer piece of software, like Aperture or Lightroom. In this screencast review, we’ll take a look at the latest features added to these photography library apps.

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