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There are too may weather apps on the Mac. All I’ve ever wanted is an accurate forecast in a simple yet beautiful user interface. Most apps are inconsistent in design, aside from the fantastic Clear Day.

The other day, I stumbled upon Beautiful Weather, a nice-looking app with a basic black, white, and pictorial design. It was only two dollars, so I decided to give it a test run to answer the typical question: was it worth downloading? (more…)

Although the Mac App Store may be the first choice for many (including myself) to find and purchase apps from, many developers (such as Dropbox) offer their apps as more traditional download, and almost always in a DMG file.

Designing and building these DMGs can be very difficult, which is where DropDMG comes in. The app offers a complete suite of tools and aims to not only provide an easy way of creating disk images, but also to create fully customised DMGs that app developers can use to distribute apps. Here’s how DropDMG can help you out if you need to make disk images anytime soon for your projects.

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YouTube is on the road to becoming a quality replacement for cable television. There are currently many channels that offer daily news coverage, comedians like Rhett & Link have their own weekly program called The Mythical Show, and even The Associated Press, WSJ, and other major news outlets have channels on the video streaming giant. While the browser is still the main way to watch YouTube, mobile platforms have official native apps for the task. Why not on the Mac, then?

Tuba is the answer to a native YouTube solution on Apple’s personal computing operating system. It’s not just another browser window that cleans up YouTube — it’s an app that accesses the API of Google’s network and pulls the videos in directly for your viewing pleasure. But is it worth using over the website?

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The practice of DLC seasons in games is not one that has been well adopted by the hardcore gaming community. While some games are showcased by this community for offering real expansion to a title, many developers’ oversaturation of paid additional content shortly after release presents a controversial topic.

What if, to have even the most basic shot of a real gameplay experience, you needed to pay for some downloadable content? That’s the angle DLC Quest aims to exploit in a satirical commentary at the ever-evolving landscape of downloadable content and in-app purchases in games. DLC Quest is a game in it’s own right, with a Mario-esque “save the girl” storyline, but makes you unlock everything from the ability to have a pet to walking in both directions using in-game cash. (more…)

The Mac has yet to see a ton of brand new RSS reader apps to fill in the gaps left by Google Reader’s death. There’s the new NetNewsWire 4 beta, and a handful of other apps with native RSS syncing, but old giants like Reeder still haven’t updated to sync with the most popular new RSS services. Instead, ReadKit has emerged as the best app to sync with the major RSS services today, despite its roots as an reading later app.

And now, another reading later app has added RSS syncing: Words. It was already a reading later app that synced with Instapaper, Readability, and Pocket that we’d covered before that’s now added native RSS syncing.

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In my constant search for new apps that are worthy of a review, I stumbled across a pretty minimalistic to-do app called Done in the Mac App Store. After a few weeks of trying it out, I’ve found myself using it almost everyday and preferring it over my usual to-do app, Wunderlist.

This got me thinking about similar minimal to-do apps like Clear, and where they might fit in a workflow. Are they really necessary? Are they just surrounded by hype? Why would you pay for a premium for an app like this?
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Theme Hospital was, and remains, one of my favourite simulation games. In your time with the game, you build and manage a hospital that has to deal with a variety of illnesses and have the facilities to do so. But Theme Hospital is not the only government-funded accommodation simulator on the block.

Prison Architect is a business management and simulation game currently in development by Introversion Software. Prison Architect is all about building and maintaining a high-security prison, implementing facilities such as visitation and labour, and reacting to the dynamic needs of your inmates. It’s still an alpha build but since it’s widely available through Steam, we’re going to take a look at it in this review. (more…)

Phone calls — the original electronic communications, after the telegraph anyhow — are still an important part of life today. We might take our calls on pocket-sized supercomputers, but they’re still phone calls. And there’s nothing more annoying than having to break out of your work to reach in your pocket and take a phone call. Plus, if you want to call someone whose number you found online, it’s annoying you can’t just copy the number and call it directly without using having money in Skype.

That’s all changed, now, with the new app Dialogue. Rather than routing all of your calls over the internet, it lets you use your phone — any phone with Bluetooth 2.0 or newer, not just an iPhone — directly through your Mac. Here’s how. (more…)

I’m always somewhat amused at the attention screenshot tools get on the Mac. Back when I used a PC every day, a 3rd party screenshot and quick image editing tool was quite the necessity. Saying Prnt Scrn and Paint didn’t quite cut it is the understatement of the decade. But on the Mac, there’s an embarrassment of riches for screenshots and quick editing built into your Mac, for free.

Frustrated about Realmac’s new replacement for LittleSnapper, Ember? Think Skitch 2 isn’t as good as it used to be? Here’s why Preview is the best built-in app on the Mac, and why you shouldn’t even worry about finding a replacement for either of them.
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Some games go big. Not content to produce a tiny slice of virtual reality, they craft entire worlds for you to wander and inhabit. Bethesda’s latest Elder Scrolls title, the enormously popular — and just plain enormous — open-world fantasy role-playing game Skyrim stands as one of the best examples of this epic scope, and this appears to be what Crescent Moon’s Ravensword: Shadowlands tries to replicate.

Ravensword doesn’t have Skyrim’s hundreds of hours of questing and exploring, but it still manages an impressive few dozen hours — which is doubly notable for the fact that it was made on a budget a fraction of the size of Skyrim’s and it’s being sold at a fraction of the price. (more…)

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