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For sole enterprises, keeping a good set of books is probably one of the most essential tasks. It helps keep all your paperwork in order and it makes it far easier when it comes to the end of the year and that massive tax bill is due. Unfortunately, though, Mac users are slightly neglected when it comes to this, and although OS X has slowly but surely clawed some of the market share away from Microsoft, when it comes to business-related apps, Windows rules the roost.

Not wanting to be outdone, Austrian-based developers Teischl, the team behind Employment:app (which we reviewed last year) have developed book’n’keep – a simple accounting software designed for sole enterprises. Unlike other accounting software, which can often run into the hundreds of dollars and require an extensive set of licences, book’n’keep is available on the App Store for a mere $29.99. Let’s take a look at it and see if it’s a worthwhile purchase for sole enterprises.


Oh, another application for screenwriters. Before you wonder about niche-dedicated applications, think about that day you had an epiphany that would be an awesome movie. One of those you would pay twice to watch, like you did with Avatar. Then you looked for an application to write a screenplay only to find out it would cost you more than what you’d expect it to sell for. So you opened your everyday word processor and began typing your story. As you’re finished, you sent to a few movie agents.

You never got a reply, even after your mother got high hopes that her child would become famous. That’s because writing a great story is not enough. The screenwriting business also requires your script to to follow a strict presentation style, which those expensive apps help achieving. Fountain changed the table, allowing regular Jacks to write screenplays in plain text. Slugline takes the game to the next level.


Google Reader’s demise has left those of us who rely on RSS feeds for our news scrambling for options. There’s tons of web services that we’ve covered on Web.AppStorm, but if you prefer using native Mac apps for your news reading, then that only helps you so much.

Reeder and other popular Google Reader apps for the Mac have promised to add support for other sync services, but another app showed them up: ReadKit. If you’re an Instapaper fan, you’ve likely tried it out after Pocket bought out the Read Later app and turned it into Pocket for Mac. Then ReadKit came along and made an app that was, if anything, nicer for reading web articles later on the Mac.

Today, they turned it up to 11 with ReadKit 2, by adding support for sync with Fever, NewsBlur, Delicious, Pinboard, and its own native RSS sync engine. ReadKit’s now your one app for all your online reading — RSS, read later, and bookmarks. (more…)

Developers, bloggers, anyone who uses iOS screenshots, lend me your ears! For too long have iOS screenshots been published with embarrassingly low battery percentages and times that reveal the nocturnal nature of the author. In some cases, you are virtually contract-bound to have your screenshot prepared in a certain way and, of course, if Apple can have every one of its own screenshots timed to a minute of each other, so can you!

This is where Status Magic comes in. It’s a simple utility for your Mac which takes your iOS screenshots and lets you polish them up with custom times, carriers, locations and more. (more…)

If you are a writer by trade, or have to do a lot of writing in your trade, you have likely (certainly?) had to deal with writer’s block. You know what I’m talking about. The dreaded staring at the screen blankly while your mind wanders aimlessly or just seems to stop working altogether. Sometimes writers block is just plain lack of motivation. Of course there are things you can do to overcome writer’s block. For me, nothing works better than a good workout or caffeine to clear the cobwebs or a pomodoro timer for a little extra motivation.

I was actually struggling with writers block at the very time I noticed Flowstate, an app that claims to help users fight through writer’s block. That’s a pretty big claim, and I couldn’t resist putting it to the test.


As more of our lives moves onto the internet every day, the importance of protecting our sensitive data grows. While many of us are happy to share vacation photos and blog posts with the world at large, some information will always need to be protected yet easily accessible when we need it.

mSecure from mSeven Software is one of the many apps designed to keep your passwords and more safe from prying eyes, one with a far cheaper price than most. The app stores everything from credit card information and web passwords to Social Security numbers and bank account numbers. In a field of increasingly-cramped competition, can mSecure offer new features and better performance to help it stand out?


Have you used apps like Byword or WriteRoom? They are simple text editors, and the reason they are so popular is that they embrace minimalism and provide a distraction-free environment for getting your writing done.

As a big fan of apps like Evernote that allow you to store and organize notes, I’ve always wished for a note-taking app that took a hint from those kinds of apps. I recently came across such an app, and it’s called Lenote. It’s almost just what I was wanting from a notes app.

Email nailed communications, and tiny file sharing. Dropbox nailed syncing folders between colleagues. CloudApp and Droplr nailed small file sharing. But none of the above helped us send large files (RAW photos, and videos, and such) quickly.

Oh, there’s ways to send large files. You can FTP them to your server or put them on S3 and let your colleague download them later. If you both have large enough Dropbox accounts, you could just sync the files over Dropbox. But either way, you’ve got to upload the files, wait for them to upload the whole way, and then remember to go email your colleague that the files are sent. Oh, and once they’ve downloaded/saved the files, you’ll likely need to go delete them to clear up space.

How about something that’ll let you send files of any size within seconds of realizing you need to send them? No waiting for uploads, just drag-and-drop the files — of any size — and send the message, then forget about it.

That’s exactly what Minbox lets you do.


I’m a big fan of Dropbox, but I don’t think it’s necessarily the easiest to use of the various cloud storage services I subscribe to. That said, if I could find a way to make it work better for me, I’d probably use it a lot more.

Spotdox extends the functionality of Dropbox, giving it that extra oomph and making it work just that little bit better. Putting all of your files in your browser so you can upload anything to Dropbox at anytime, Spotdox wants to make Dropbox go the extra mile. Will a little extra access make me love Dropbox more and turn Spotdox into a winner? (more…)

With Adobe’s “no CS7″ announcement, everyone seems a little shaken up. Some are even looking for good software alternatives already. If you’re one of them, this app may catch your attention.

Let us introduce you to MotionComposer. MotionComposer is Aquafadas’ answer to Adobe’s Edge Animate or Tumult’s Hype, so if you are a web developer having a tough time animating websites with HTML5 and CSS3, it’s an app you should be checking out.


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