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Some days, it seems to me that we’re in a technological era that demonstrates simultaneous trends of increased utility and decreased complexity. The strive for simplicity is apparent in Mac software, and the effects are often increased productivity and clarity. The best example of this that I can come up with is a growing number of Mac apps that set out to do one thing really well, rather than the swiss-army-knife applications of the past (not that there isn’t still a time and place for those).

Today, I’m going to take a look at one such application called SnipEdges. Developed by Houdah Software, SnipEdges is a new kind of global snippet manager. It uses the confinement of your screen as its management method, rather than a hierarchical window, and it does so to great effect. Let’s dig in, shall we?

We’re big fans of apps which reside in the Menu Bar here at Mac.AppStorm. Personally, at least two of my most essential Mac apps live up there in the top right hand corner of the screen. However, with the proliferation of useful, lightweight Menu Bar apps, things can begin to get a little crowded in no time at all.

Well, for this admittedly niche problem, there’s an elegant solution in the form of Surtees Studios’ Bartender. Its a utility which promises to give users about as much control over the Menu Bar as one could reasonably hope to have.


As most programmers are already aware, Git is a very powerful open source version control system. There are a handful of popular version control systems (VCS) to choose from, but most power users lean toward Git or Subversion (SVN). Schools of thought vary on which is best, but it is universally accepted that professionals of all kinds can benefit from a good version control system. Even for those who don’t write or program professionally, a good VCS can help catalog changes in all sorts of personal projects. Launching into Git for the first time, however, might not be the most pleasant experience for the average first-timer.

Tower changes that and makes Git a tool that everyone should have loaded up in their repertoire.


If you use TextExpander much, chances are you don’t actually think about the app itself that much. You’ve added your own shortcuts to it over the years, and now you type them in and they’re automatically expanded without you even thinking. It just becomes another part of your Mac.

This week, Smile Software released the first full new version of TextExpander since 2010. It adds several new features, but if you’re already using TextExpander 3, a quick glance at their new features list might not even make it seem like its worth your time to upgrade. After all, when’s the last time you opened the TextExpander window, anyhow?

Turns out, there’s more than meets the eye in TextExpander 4.


Although many developers are porting or even rewriting applications designed for Windows to the Mac, many these days still find the need to run Windows on your Mac. I find that need every single day at work.  While there are three main ways to get the job done, Parallels has always been my favorite.

Parallels Desktop 7 is a dramatic improvement over the previous version, and brings along a few cool new features. If running alternate operating systems on your Mac is a priority, read on as we dive into the latest version of Parallels Desktop!


As more of our documents get moved off our local drives and into the cloud, it can be difficult to stay on top of them all. I keep stuff scattered around in my Gmail account, Dropbox folder, and laptop, among many other places, and can have a hard time remembering where a particular item is.

The developers of Found recognized this problem and created an interesting solution. Using a search concept similar to Spotlight, Found searches not only your local machine but also common cloud services. Any app designed to help you find files needs to do so quickly, using an intuitive interface. How does Found fare under these important conditions?


Apple’s tagline for the Mac App Store is “Thousands of apps. One simple way to get them,” and for what it’s worth, Apple’s tagline is true. Since its introduction in early 2011, the Mac App Store made finding and purchasing spiffy new applications easier than ever. It also made it easy for indepedent developers to get the same access to customers as the big boys at Adobe, Microsoft, and Electronic Arts.

The problem with the Mac App Store isn’t that apps aren’t easy to get, or that the App Store is difficult to browse and search. The problem is that, every day, developers throughout the industry offer discounts on their apps to help increase their exposure, but the Mac App Store offers no simple way to find these deals. Enter AppyDays from Slappstick, which promises to do what the Mac App Store can’t: give you easy access to all the best discounts.

Let’s see if it lives up to its promise.


I spent two years living in Paraguay, where temperatures are scorching hot and air conditioning is practically non-existent. I had my old MacBook with me the whole time, which I routinely had to open up and clean Paraguay’s ubiquitous red dirt out of. Despite my best efforts, it died an early death, and the culprit, a tech later explained, was heat.

Keeping your Mac cool not only extends its life, but also improves performance. There are a few available utilities that help you keep tabs on your computer’s temperature using the built-in sensors that Macs have. Temperature Gauge from Tunabelly Software is the latest of these apps on the scene.


Be honest: have you ever told yourself “I absolutely need to remember this thing on that day” only to let the time come and pass blissfully unaware? Don’t despair, you are not alone in this.

I know this for sure because otherwise we wouldn’t have a wonderful app called Due, which is dedicated solely to the task of making sure that you remember in time. Let’s take a look at how Due can change things for you.


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