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If you’re reading this article then in all likelihood you spend a significant amount of time on your Mac, whether for work or play. However, while the increasing digitization of the modern world has led to real tangible benefits such as unparalleled communication, the easy spread of ideas and, of course, Lolcats, there is a more harmful side to heavy computer use and that is the effect it can have on our health.

These health risks often present themselves with issues such as back pain, RSI (or repetitive strain injury) and an increased risk of cardiovascular problems. In an ideal world, we’d simply not work so much and go outside and enjoy some exercise but since this is not always possible, there’s Time Out Free.


Chances are pretty good that up until now, you had no idea that there is a built-in application on Macs that is capable of pretty decent handwriting recognition. The application, called Inkwell, is built into the Mac operating system and is shown only if you have a graphics tablet plugged into your computer.

Inkwell, more commonly referred to as “Ink” allows users to input handwriting via the graphics tablet for use in just about any program that accepts text inputs. The program also allows users to create quick sketches, useful for communicating information via image, chart or map. Read on to learn more about what Ink can do and how well it works.


I’m a big fan of menu bar apps, if you’ve read a few of my articles you probably have noticed how much I’m used to having easy access to certain features directly though the menu bar, without having to quit what I’m doing.

Being a fan of these types of apps, I have also come to collect a ton of them that take up a lot of space and end up getting in the way of my workflow; they aren’t always in the same place and they always get moved around randomly when I boot up my computer.

That’s where today’s app comes in. It’s an app that gives you the ability to organize the items in your menu bar. It’s called MenuBar ReArranger, want to take a look?


It is rare to find a note taking tool that incorporates task management. That’s why proNotes first caught my attention a few years ago, but then development seemed to wane and I lost track of the application. That is until a few months ago, when I stumbled upon the proNotes website and found that version 2.0 was in development.

I’ve been testing the new version, which is now available to the public. Let’s take a look at the new proNotes 2.0 and see if my early intrigue was warranted.


Since Adobe announced the beta for Photoshop CS6 a little over a week ago, it has been downloaded more than half a million times. Even if you’ve managed to miss the onslaught of tweets and reviews, the magnitude of eager testers should indicate how anxious photographers and designers were for an update to their beloved software.

A number of articles have been written that overview the new features and changes to CS6. After working with the beta every day for over a week, I will instead try to give my impressions on what features I find most useful and am actually incorporating into my workflow already. Read on to see what features have stood out to me.


So you’re quickly browsing through your Facebook or Twitter feed, taking a short break from work, when you find an interesting article or video that you know is bound to be a huge time-suck. You don’t really want to look it up later when you aren’t busy because you know you’ll forget to do it. You also don’t want to read it or see it right there because you don’t want to get too distracted or you’re not in the right situation for it.

If you’re anything like me, you’ll save it for later by bookmarking it; be it marking it as a favorite on Twitter, sending it to Instapaper, starring it on Google Reader, or any of the equivalents in any social network. But then you’ll likely never come back to it because you’ll forget exactly where you saved it (and the tons of other content that you also bookmarked on other networks for later). That’s where Favs comes in.


Git. If you hail from the US, perhaps you’re thinking of the word “get” being said with a southern accent. Or if you’re from the UK then maybe you’re thinking of the rather unpleasant slang term.

I don’t mean either. I’m talking about the distributed version control system called Git. Or more specifically, I’m speaking of the hosted version of that software known as GitHub.

What’s GitHub you ask? And why are we talking about it on Mac.AppStorm? Well, the answer to the fist question is a bit long, so if you’ll humor me, I’ll address the second question first: we’re discussing Git and GitHub because the fine folks at GitHub have released a Mac app. And that’s what we’re all about here at Mac.AppStorm. So before we dive into GitHub for Mac, allow me to briefly explain just what Git is in the first place.


When it comes to FTP clients, there are too many of them to count. You could go with FileZilla, since it’s free, but it’s really not the greatest solution out there since it lacks quite a few features that advanced users seek. Cyberduck, on the other hand, is another great client – and it’s open source, though you really should donate to help out the developers.

Up until now, I used Cyberduck for all my connections, assuming that it was the best free solution available. Well, if you’re willing to pay $9.99, then there’s something much better out there. It’s called Flow and it’s developed by Five Details. In my experience, this has been the best FTP client that I’ve ever used on the Mac. Read on to find out why.


Until now AirPlay has been a way for you to stream music from your iTunes to wireless speakers, or video from your iOS device to an Apple TV. However, with Reflection you can now connect your iOS device to your Mac wirelessly using AirPlay and mirror your screen.

Head past the break to see how Reflection holds up.


DVDs get scratched, broken and ruined in many ways. Unfortunately, this is a simple fact of life. Luckily, there are a number of programs that exist to help rip and back up DVDs. One of these programs, and the focus of this review, is Mac DVD Ripper Pro (MDRP).

This app exists not as a jack-of-all-trades application but rather as a master of (just about) one. MDRP decrypts and rips DVDs to your hard-drive. These rips can then be stored, played, burnt to a back-up DVD or even exported as a .mp4 file to play on a variety of mobile devices. Read on to learn exactly how it all goes down.


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