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In one of my previous articles, I wrote about LyX, an easy way to produce documents in TeX without any prior knowledge of the typesetting language. However, for anyone with a knowledge of TeX, LyX can seem a little limited in its functionality and can, sometimes, be complicated to use. To really appreciate the power of TeX and what it can really do (especially if you do a lot of writing), it is worth taking some time out and learning the typesetting language (which is a lot simpler than it actually seems!).

There are quite a few TeX editors out there for the Mac however most of them are simply ports of native Windows or Linux editors and don’t really make use of OS X’s design and functionality. However, this has now changed. Independent developers Valleta Ventures have come up with TexPad, a native TeX editor for OS X with some handy features that make TeX editing a breeze. Let’s take a closer look.


As fantastic as the Mac OS is, there are plenty of reasons you might want to run Windows from time to time: maybe you need to run some old school XP software for work, or you want to try out some PC games, or (like me) you have to test websites in Internet Explorer.

If you’re going the virtualization route, you can try out the free VirtualBox, but if you’re looking for something more powerful and user-friendly, the two main competitors are Parallels and VMware Fusion. I’ve tried both, and have been happily using VMware Fusion for the year and a half. VMware recently came out with a major update packed with new features, so let’s take a look at what it has to offer.

Are there any folders which you access more often than others? And does it bug you that you have to navigate the folder structure again and again?

True, you can just create an alias on your desktop, but that really looks awful and cluttered after a while. So why not give Desktop Shelves a try? The Mac app lets you access your folder content beautifully and easily directly from your desktop.


If you’ve owned a Mac for more than a couple months, then chances are you’ve been encouraged to install an app called Growl, perhaps by another user or by an app that you are installing. Growl is the most popular notifications system available for Mac, and it has recently gotten a big revision that the developers claim to be the biggest one yet.

Want to see what it’s all about? Let’s take a look at all the changes Growl has had.

Today we’ll be looking at a wonderfully simple app that’s basically the result of a collision of a notes app and a calculator. The result is a simple and friendly way to take notes with basic built-in support for automatic mathematical functions.

The app is called Numeric Notes and if you’re in the market to upgrade your basic calculator, you might want to take a look.


I’ve been fortunate enough to work with several time tracking applications in my time here at AppStorm (such an app can be indispensable for a freelancer). Some of these apps are nothing more than glorified spreadsheets, some place timers in your menubar that need to be activated at precisely the right times, and still others promise to sit quietly in the back of the room and make a note of your every move.

This premise may sound creepy, but consider for a moment the value of such data. First, it can provide valuable insight to how you spend (read: waste) your time on your computer. Second, it can take a lot of the headache out of invoicing for freelance projects, allowing you to tally up a very accurate number of hours that you spent on a given project.

Today I’m going to look at Time Track Pro, a time tracking app from the folks at Bloop that proves very useful in both of these regards.


Over the past week or so we’ve been on a mission to help you improve the experience of file browsing by introducing you to interesting Finder alternatives. We started with TotalFinder, which boosts your Finder’s natural functionality by adding tabs. We then moved on to Raskin, which dramatically redesigns the entire file browsing process.

Today we’ll wrap up this series with an incredibly useful and unique utility called Default Folder X, which helps you navigate your file structure at lightning speed when saving or opening files.


For many users, a computer’s desktop quickly turns into a headache. If you are anything like me, you use it to keep temporary files that you might only use once, but that need to be saved somewhere temporarily. I sometimes keep items there to remind myself of things that I need to do. It is also always filled with .dmg files from installed apps, among other things.

Whatever it is that I’ve used my desktop for recently, it is usually filled with a number of items that I probably don’t need at that moment and that just distract me. Sometimes you need a clean desktop to do a presentation, or sometimes you want to quickly hide everything that is there to take a quick screenshot (like if you are a writer for a Mac app website and you need to take a lot of screenshots of running apps).

That’s why we are reviewing today’s app. It’s called Desktop Tidy and it claims to fix this problem with a few features you don’t typically see in competing apps. Does it succeed? Let’s see!


Earlier this week we took a look at TotalFinder, a reserved but incredibly useful Finder replacement that uses a tabbed interface to augment your typical file browsing experience.

Today we’re going to follow that up with something that’s not a subtle change but a completely re-imagined file browser like nothing else you’ve ever used: Raskin. Intrigued? You should be.


It’s coming up on two years since we first took a look at an interesting Finder replacement app called TotalFinder, which was in its initial stages of development at the time. It was a little shaky back then but it has come a long way and is definitely worth another look.

In case you’ve never used it, we’ll walk through what TotalFinder is and why it just might make you leave the normal finder behind for good.


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