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Digital photography has made it cheaper and easier to capture the brightest moments of life. The number of megapixels in digital cameras go up with every new model and so does the size the of images we capture. After a few months, even those who occasionally use their cameras end up with few gigabytes of images in their hard drives.

Not all the images are going to be viewed frequently, so it makes sense to burn them to DVDs or upload them to the cloud. Easy portability and plenty of affordable space to store make the cloud the ideal photo storage destination. I recently discovered MemoryCloud and unlike its peers, this photo (and multimedia) storing app focuses only on the files stored on Macs. Sounds interesting right?


TeX is one of the lesser known ways of creating documents as it has mostly extremely specialized uses. The typesetting system was designed and written (mostly) by Donald Knuth during the late 1970’s and is a popular choice for typing documents for two main reasons. The first is that documents are standardized across all computers and the results do not change with time. Despite the fact TeX is an old system, the documents still look (relatively) up-to-date, albeit a little lacking in color and design.

The second reason why TeX is so popular, especially in the academic world, is the way it renders maths and mathematical formulas. The range of formulas that can be constructed using TeX is vast and far more flexible than the offerings of other programs (for example Word’s built-in equation editor). The only hindrance to typing up your documents in TeX is that there a very steep learning curve associated with it. TeX is more like a code, with commands and functions and it’s not as easy as simply loading up Word and tapping away.


We last reviewed WriteRoom way back in 2009. It is arguably the app that launched the fullscreen minimal text editor craze that seems at its height right now. In a time when text editing apps were becoming more and more bloated with features in order to stay competitive, WriteRoom was a breath of fresh air making a very convincing argument for what it called “distraction free writing.”

WriteRoom recently hit version 3.0, and we think this major overhaul makes it the perfect time to take a fresh look. If you haven’t seen this app in a while, you’ll want to check it out!


Despite how much everyone hates it, they simply cannot eliminate email from their personal and most importantly professional lives. It’s the ideal form of communication because it’s instant, unintrusive, good for both long and short form communication. And it’s very economical – often times it’s free. So, email isn’t going anywhere.

Folks use various email clients to tackle email overload and the choices in that front are aplenty. I’m not new to Postbox. I have tried it since version one and revisit the app every time there is a new version. So, when there was an opportunity to take a look at the impending version 3.0, I jumped in to get a glimpse of all those new exciting features. And boy, there are so many. Come, join me to take a sneak peek!


Way back in my unenlightened days as a Windows user, I spent a great deal of time using various PDF editors. In an effort to avoid conflict with our friends at Windows.AppStorm, allow me to clarify: I don’t hate on Windows simply to hate on Windows–and indeed there are a lot of great Windows apps out there. But I think that even they will agree with me when I say that there are a lot of poorly designed PDF manipulation apps floating around on the Internet.

As an unrelated product of circumstance, my need for PDF manipulation apps has decreased since I became a Mac user. However, all of those frustrating memories came rushing back when I was given the opportunity to check out PDFactory from the folks at Appthology. An app that promised to be the perfect balance between the power of Adobe Acrobat and the slim-profile native glory that is OS X’s very own Preview had to be worth a try, right? Hit the jump to find out exactly how PDFactory holds up!


Are you sick of reading reviews for the same old Markdown text editor under different titles? Me too. Don’t worry, Mou is genuinely different.

Join us as we take a look at how Mou takes a unique approach to Markdown editing and how it may be exactly what you’ve been looking for.


Most of us find ourselves writing at least once a day on a computer. And surely you have found yourself more than once annoyed at having to type out the same phrase over and over again. Or maybe you’d like a way to quickly insert an image, date or signature?

Here’s where Typinator comes in. The tiny tool helps you to set up abbreviations, which it will expand to whatever text you define. How exactly that works we’ll have a look at after the break.


When I’m not writing Appstorm reviews or doing schoolwork, I’m a freelance web developer. A lot of what I know about web development I owe to the in-depth tutorials and screencasts over at Nettuts+, which is, in my opinion, one of the most reliable and richest resources for all levels of learning. You may or may not know that Nettuts+ is owned by Envato, who also happens to run AppStorm. We’re an ever growing family of sites aimed at providing you with all your digital needs, from education and app reviews to online marketplaces for designers and developers.

In addition to providing quality educational materials, Nettuts+ has recently entered into the world of Mac app development with a duo of helpful web development tools: Nettuts Builder and Structurer Pro.

Read on to find out how to use these great utilities to speed up your web development workflow!

As you may have gathered from my recent posts, I have yet to upgrade to Lion on my personal MacBook Pro. But that doesn’t mean I don’t have my ways of playing with the new operating system (and the apps and utilities that are released for it). And let me just say… developers are taking the changes in stride and coming up with some really great apps.

File management is a big deal for people who use their Mac every day, especially if it’s how you make your living. Some of you are command-line ninjas, and moving files about your hard drive with just a few keystrokes is second nature. But for the rest of us who rely on the GUI to drag files between folders, documents, emails, and various other drop locations, OS X Lion’s full-screen apps are less than conducive to streamlining this process.

It’s entirely likely that, if you have not yet discovered Yoink, you’ve used workarounds for moving files that you weren’t even aware were inconvenient. You create temporary folders, or drag files to the desktop, and then have to clean up extraneous copies after the move is complete. The new app from Eternal Storms Software (creators of flickery and ScreenFloat) is intended to remedy that. Yoink puts a contextual shelf on the side of your screen that appears only when you need it to aide you in cross-space file movement.


There is no doubt that the iPhone made push notifications cool and took that idea mainstream for Apple fans. But like most things Apple, at first push notifications weren’t open to all third party apps at launch. When users were clamoring for a way to get notified of things as and when they happen, Boxcar jumped in and filled the void effectively.

Boxcar was an elegant solution and alerted users with instant push notifications for all your social networks, email accounts, RSS feeds and more. As Apple opened up push notifications to third party developers, the influence of Boxcar dropped down a bit, but with 1.2 billion messages delivered to date, it’s an app with no match.

To make the lives of information junkies everywhere easy, Boxcar has released a beta version for Mac making it a breeze to receive super fast notifications when someone comments, updates or messages you. Join me after the break to check out if the app is as good as its iOS counterpart.


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