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I’m a firm believer in the benefits of journalling and writing every day. Julia Cameron’s book, “The Artist’s Way” has been very significant in my life, and after reading it for the first time, I kept up the central practice she recommends – of writing three pages first thing every morning – almost every day for the following five years. For the past few months, I’ve fallen out of the habit, but I know I will pick it up again in time, and that I will most likely continue to keep a journal of some kind for the rest of my life.

I’ve always preferred pen or pencil on paper for this kind of writing, but I thought it might be time to have a go with one of the several journaling apps available for the Mac. I’ve gone straight to Mémoires, an app produced by Coding Robots, whose YouTube viewer, Cathodique, we included in our piece on improving YouTube.

Like Cathodique, Mémoires is a well-focused application: it does one thing, with minimal fuss or distraction. And yet it does that single thing well enough that it makes one take note. Join us after the jump for a quick walkthrough of Mémoires’ main features.


How many times have you wished you could easily backup your data on-site or onto a remote server? Parachute is a simplistic backup application that is designed to compliment Time Machine with features that allow you to back up locally and remotely. On top of this you can set the scheduling of the backups as well as ‘smart backups’ (similar system to Time Machine).

The most obvious reason for backing up to a remote location is if your computer/hard drive become damaged or stolen. However it’s always a good idea to have a ‘second backup’ – better to be safe than sorry right?


It seems fairly clear now that Google has won the RSS war. There aren’t many serious contenders for the title now that Newsgator has closed down their own aggregators and shifted their users over to Google Reader. Bloglines, though it has a pretty good web interface, seems to have suffered by comparison.

There are of course other options out there (Fever is a favourite among the more tech savvy), but of these three who were a while ago the main contenders, Google seems to have come out with the greatest number of users and the most rapidly developing platform.

Today we’ll be taking a look at a desktop companion to the Google Reader juggernaut. Gruml is a relatively new RSS reader for the Mac that syncs well with the service, and offers plenty of customisation options. Join us after the jump for a quick tour of its main features.


We spend more and more time reading web pages. So much of the information we take in each day comes from the sites we visit, whether that be in the course of work, pleasure, or study. If you have the time to spend on following a trail of links and reading whatever crosses your screen, just as it grabs your attention, you’re luckier than most of us.

Mostly we have to rely on some system for saving things of interest so that we don’t lose out. Today we’ll be taking a look at one tool in particular; QuietRead.


Today we’re going to get our hands on the newest version of Transmit, Panic’s longstanding FTP client. Though it’s the patriarch of Mac FTP applications, Transmit has been knocked about recently by a few new competitors upping the ante for innovation and style.

Transmit 4 has risen to the challenge with a completely redesigned interface, newly streamlined workflow and stunning speed increases. I’ll just say now to any Transmit 3 users, this is an update you won’t want to miss.


If you like to know what’s happening behind the scenes on your Mac, Bjango’s iStat Menus 3 (currently on sale for $10) is one of the very best apps available to you. I’ve heard people recommending it for years, but though I’ve tried it several times, it’s never really stuck for me – until recently.

Bjango recently released version 3 and, although there are some significant changes in this version, there’s not much new except for the addition of battery monitoring.

I’ll walk you through the app’s main features, and conclude with a few comments on what I’d like to see added in the future, as well as suggesting a couple of alternative options.


Cruz is an exciting new browser from the creator of Fluid that integrates some innovative multi-window and social networking features into your web surfing experience.

Cruz is still on version 0.4, so it’s not necessarily fair to evaluate it as a finished product, but we still wanted to show off what it can do so far. Let’s get started!


When I reviewed Together a couple of months ago, several commenters noted its similarity to Yojimbo, and suggested that we take a look. Of course I’d heard of Yojimbo before: it’s one of those near-legendary apps that the Great and the Good of the Mac world seem to swear by. It turns up fairly often on one of my favourite blogs, The Setup.

But for some reason, I’ve never given Yojimbo much more than a cursory glance. I’ve downloaded it once or twice and run it for a while each time, but it’s never stuck for me. I was aware of some complaints about the speed of development of Yojimbo – it seemed to have been standing still for quite some time.

But then version 2.0 arrived (quite suddenly, and without much fanfare). The changes implemented in the new version seem to have done the trick for many people – some who had started wondering about other, similar products (Together, DevonThink, VoodooPad, etc.) returned to the fold. And I decided it was time for me to have a proper look too…


Time Machine is one of Apple’s greatest inventions – instead of dreading backups and regretting not having one when your disk fails, you can now just switch to your backup disk and restore it.

But as comfortable as the backing up itself is, it can still be tricky to find the one file you are needing. That’s where Back-In-Time comes in. This handy little tool allows you to dive into your (and not just your own) backups and quickly get what you need.


So you think you can spel? While we all know how to spell and write correctly, typing errors, lack of concentration, or maybe even a issue such as dyslexia might prevent us from spelling every single word the right way. Then we have to deal with those red squiggly lines beneath words which quickly become frustrating.

That’s where Spell Catcher comes in to try and make your typing life easier. It’s designed to greatly improve the in-built spell checking capabilities of OS X, though may go a little too far with the range of preferences on offer!


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