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Whether you enjoy cooking or not, it’s a task which most people usually partake in to some degree. I’ve always enjoyed spending time in the kitchen, and have built up a fairly extensive (and space consuming!) collection of recipe books. Nowadays I find the internet to be the best resource for finding recipe inspiration. Sites such as BBC Food, and the extensive All Recipes seem to offer a never-ending collection of ideas.

However, until downloading SousChef I lacked a central resource for storing the wide variety of meal ideas collected via the Internet. SousChef is a kitchen companion for your Mac, offering an extensive database of online recipes, powerful storage and search tools, the ability to create grocery lists, and a few entertaining tools to make cooking easier.


Security is always a paramount concern when storing a decent amount of information on your computer. Fortunately, OS X is a reasonably secure operating system by default – user data is kept separate, it’s easy to password protect your account, and you can encrypt your whole drive with FileVault if desired. Unfortunately, there’s no simple way to encrypt a particular file, folder or application. This is where Espionage comes in, providing a simple method to password protect and encrypt only the data you want to.

The latest release has brought a number of improvements to the user experience, and integration with other areas of OS X. If you’re interested in securing particular pieces of information on your Mac, read on to learn about how Espionage can help.


As the range of features in Safari grow with every release, it has started to encompass the additional functionality offered by many third party plugins. There are still a decent number of extra features which you’re able to add on though, and one decent app which supports Safari 4 is Glims.

This review will be taking a look at the functionality offered by Glims, which includes adding a range of search engines to your toolbar, integrating website screenshots into search results, full-screen browsing, website icons in tabs, and a whole host of other bits and pieces.


A huge range of websites seem to offer weather information, though until now there has been a fairly limited range of integration with desktop apps (other than through Dashboard). The idea of integrating a weather forecast with iCal is one which seems obvious, but has only recently been introduced in the form of WeatherCal.

WeatherCal is a $10 System Preferences app which adds a five day weather forecast into iCal for cities of your choice. Forecasts appear as all day events, and are easy to sync with your iPhone or iPod Touch. This review will provide an overview of WeatherCal as well as a couple of solutions which provide very similar functionality for free.


The rise of blogging online has lead to a number of new desktop applications which assist with the process. Often it can be useful to benefit from integration with other desktop apps, whether for posting RSS links, or adding media to an entry. MarsEdit is arguably the most popular blog tool for OS X, and is able to integrate with a range of different blog platforms.

This review will outline the main features of MarsEdit and how the software works, it will explore a few limitations currently present, and suggest a few other alternatives for those looking for a free solution.


We’ve recently looked at a few screenshot tools, along with a range of screen recording applications. A recent addition to this area of software which caught my eye is Layers, a screenshot utility which records all your screen content in a layered Photoshop file.

Layers is actually quite an advanced application, with a whole bunch of different preferences and options for changing what is recorded and how the file is produced. This review will take a look at what’s on offer, and investigate how useful this functionality actually is.


There are countless different ways to design a website, and a variety of different tools to make the job easier. These range from writing the raw code in an app such as TextWrangler to using an integrated environment such as Coda. There is a more visual route available as well, commonly called “What You See Is What You Get” (WYSIWYG), which aims to make designing a website a remarkably simple process.

An application called iWeb, part of the iLife suite, is probably already sitting on your Mac. If it doesn’t meet your needs, another popular tool is RapidWeaver – a long standing visual web editor with a decent range of features. This review will showcase the main capabilities of RapidWeaver and explain how easy it can be to have a website up and running in no time.


Suffering from data loss and crashing applications is, thankfully, a fairly uncommon occurrence on a Mac – but it still happens. There’s nothing more aggravating than losing a few hours of work, simply because you forgot to hit the save button. It happens to even the most proficient computer – we all suffer from “Untitled Document Syndrome” from time to time.

One new application aiming to combat our reluctance to save documents is EverSave, a free menu bar tool which can automatically save your open documents after a set time interval, or when switching between applications. The idea is a simple one, but could save you a real headache when you accidentally close an application without thinking. This review will provide an overview of EverSave, the various options and settings available, and a few areas which need further development.


I feel it’s safe to say that most of us are accustomed to using an application such as Photoshop for image editing. I’ve been using it for years, but have recently started to find that – for tasks such as editing images for the web – it’s far too feature packed and resource consuming for my needs.

I was intruiged to hear about Pixelmator, an OS X only image editing tool designed with speed, simplicity and a great user interface in mind. It lacks the raw power of Photoshop, but provides a great, flexible tool for graphics editing and photo manipulation. It’s a fairly recently launched app, but has already undergone several updates, adding widely requested functionality.

This review will take a look at the features offered by Pixelmator and let you know whether I think it’s a tool worthy of being branded a Photoshop competitor.


With the introduction of Spotlight and system wide smart folders, Apple took a big step forward in making your local files far easier to search and organize. Many complementary tools exist to help tag and label files, and Fresh is a new app which provides a simple way to display and interact with the most recently added/edited files on your Mac.

Fresh takes the form of a floating interface, showing a graphical list of recent files. You’re able to drag and drop a file from Fresh to anywhere in your system, double click a file to continue working with it, or store files in the ‘Cooler’, a virtual space for making regularly edited files easily accessible. This review will outline the main features of Fresh and show you how to download the app for free (usually $9).


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