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iPhoto, Shoebox, Bridge – these pieces of software may ring a bell if organization is important to you. The problem is that they all have one thing in common – dealing with photos.

Why does it seem like keeping home movies and video organized is always overshadowed by static photographs? With video technology on the rise and more and more normal, non-tech savvy folks owning devices capable of capturing high quality films, we’re starting to look for something more capable in this area.

If you have a large collection of home videos, you’re in luck. Clipstart is a piece of software to keep your short movies in a well organised, fully searchable database. In this review I’ll cover this app’s uses and how to get the most out of it.

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With iFlicks, you can manage your entire video collection through iTunes. iFlicks imports video files of almost any kind (.avi, .mpeg, .mkv, etc), tags them with all the meta data you could wish for and even converts videos into a different file type – but only if necessary!

The days of searching for files across drives and spending hours with conversion processes are finally over. In this review, we’ll be taking an in-depth look at how iFlicks makes managing your digital TV shows easy!

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DVDs can be a nuisance to carry around. They also scratch, break, or go missing over time. RipIt, from The Little App Factory lets you rip your DVDs to your Mac so that you can watch them at anytime without the DVD inserted in your drive.

RipIt is an application so beautifully simplistic, even your mum would have no problem using it. This review will have a look at why RipIt is better than other apps out there, highlight how the process works, and take a look at what’s missing.

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Few people would argue that we’ve begun to see a fundamental shift away from broadcast television to online media in recent years. That said, there’s still a phenomenal demand for digital, cable and satellite television (and some great programming available).

Just because broadcast TV isn’t streamed over the Internet, doesn’t mean that your Mac can’t play a part in the experience. Today I’ll be looking at EyeTV, an application designed to watch, pause, record and convert television on your Mac. To use the application, you’ll also need a compatible TV receiver (I’ll be using the EyeTV Sat, which supports HD in the UK).

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Various screencasting and screen-recording tools are available for the Mac, and we have covered these previously in a fairly extensive roundup. Today I’ll be taking a look at a new kid on the block – Camtasia.

Designed by TechSmith, Camtasia is a long standing screencast application for Windows that has recently made the move across to OS X. It costs $99, and is aimed at making the process of recording a screencast as simple as possible. I’ll be looking at the various features on offer, and drawing a few comparisons to ScreenFlow, another competing screencast application.

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Keeping media on your computer has some great benefits. Watching movies directly from your hard drive saves battery life. DVDs scratch easily, so backing up lets you have some peace of mind.

Now here’s the problem: You don’t have any visual cues as to what is what. Rather than looking for the covers and cases you know so well, you must rely on the same sterile document icon (or preview of the first scene of the movie if you have icon previews on) and the small label underneath.

SlipCover, from Bohemian Coding is a free solution for this little problem. Today I’ll show you SlipCover and it’s features, as well as how and where to find cases to expand SlipCover’s Repertoire.

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Tivo revolutionized television watching, bringing in the flood of Digital Video Recorders that allowed TV enthusiasts to skip commercials at lightning speed, pause and rewind live TV as well as controlling when they watched their favorite shows.

Now there is another revolution stirring: online television. We all remember having to either purchase TV shows through iTunes or, if we wanted to watch them for free, we were sent on a wild goose chase through various network websites.

This is where Hulu steps in. Hulu’s new Mac desktop offers a simple way to stream television shows online. This review will take an in-depth look at Hulu Desktop, investigating whether it sets a new standard in TV streaming, or whether we’ll still be turning to Boxee for the best desktop experience.

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Whether you’re an expert cinematographer or passionate about Lost, most Mac users find themselves needing to convert video between formats from time-to-time. I used to swear by an app called VisualHub, but the developer has unfortunately now stopped work on the project.

In late 2008, an older DVD ripping application – HandBrake – was given a new lease of life. It is no longer limited to purely archiving DVDs, but can now open and convert between practically any type of video source.

This review will take a look at how HandBrake works, give an overview of what the application is capable of, and highlight how it can be used to better managing your video library.

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