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Writing for the web has always been burdened by the need to format content in HTML. It isn’t enough to just write and publish content—you need to capture the reader’s attention as well.

You can’t simply write a blog post or a web page and slap it onto the site. Headers, bolding, emphasis, bullet lists, and numbering are necessary to hold down and guide your readers all the way to the last sentence. The process can be quite tedious, which is why the birth of Markdown is a huge breath of fresh air for content creators of all experience levels.

But Markdown isn’t just for those who work online. It’s a simple syntax that makes formatting and writing in plain text easier for everyone. With these writing apps, you’ll have an easier time putting your thoughts down on screen, whether you’re writing a note for yourself or a Markdown formatted file for publishing online.
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When you’re looking for a good way to introduce a product, create a trailer for a film, or even edit a photo, Apple has some good software to offer its Mac users. iMovie, iPhoto, GarageBand and other members of the iLife suite are included with OS X. Many users really enjoy these and think of them as prime benefits of owning a Mac. However, there are more professional versions of such software available from Apple. Final Cut Pro, for instance, is a truly professional way to edit a short picture or even a full independent film; Logic Pro brings every single audio tool to your fingertips; and Aperture is nearly on par with Photoshop, just aimed at a different price range.

The product we’re interested in today is Motion, a companion to Final Cut Pro. It’s designed to help you create motion graphics, moving versions of brochures you’d already have designed in Photoshop or Pixelmator. This software can help small businesses create advertisements for their new products at beautiful high definition. However, not everyone wants to create one of these from scratch, so what about a template for it? Our parent company Envato’s VideoHive now offers a section for just that. But there are currently 35 templates available, so which one is best for you? Let’s take a look at eight of the most well-designed.

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Recently, digital game distributors GOG.com launched a new catalogue of Mac OS X games. However, the launch doesn’t simply attempt to compete with rival Steam’s library of newer titles, like Call of Duty: Black Ops and Portal 2.

Instead, GOG.com launched with a big focus on classic titles, with such iconic games as SimCity 2000 and Theme Hospital. After we took a look at the service in general, in this article, let’s check out some of the nostalgia you can indulge in. (more…)

If you have both a laptop and a desktop Mac, you probably know the pains of grabbing your laptop, heading to the local coffee house and searching for an app on your MacBook only to realize that it’s only installed on your desktop. This usually requires you to head home with your coffee and work from there, right? Wrong. If you’re router is properly configured, you can still grab anything you need from your home computer thanks to Virtual Network Computing, or VNC.

VNC allows users to remotely control their Mac or PC from another device. While all Macs have a built-in VNC host which can be activated under the Screen Sharing options in System Preferences, you’ll need to download your own VNC viewer, or client, to your laptop or other Mac that you would like to use to control your home computer. Luckily for you, the App Store is filled with different VNC viewers, each of which bring individual luxuries to the table. Below, we’ve compiled the best of the best in order to help you make the best decision when purchasing a VNC viewer.

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Back in April of this year, the popular service Read It Later was revamped and completely renewed, completely with a brand new name, Pocket. Pocket continues to be one of the popular mobile apps that is always featured on roundups of must-have apps for your iPhone or Android device.

Today, the developers of the hit bookmarking service released Pocket for Mac, an official client for the service on OS X, to work alongside and in sync with other platforms. If you’ve been using Read Later on your Mac, the release of Pocket for Mac replaces that too with developer Michael Schneider having worked on the official client. Shall we take a look? (more…)

Album artwork is a big part of iTunes! For a lot of people, it helps make content easier to locate by adding an image to each artist and album. It’s also a half-developed feature, however. Apple could do a lot more with the album artwork from the iTunes Store. The developer of Bowtie had the same thoughts, so he introduced an app that put artwork on your desktop where you’ll see it often. Now you don’t have to open iTunes to see what’s playing; do a quick show-the-desktop gesture on your trackpad instead.

The Bowtie utility isn’t everything, though. Themes make it worth using: themes designed by individuals. There is a superfluity of different ways to view album artwork with Bowtie, from the pleasant default theme included with the app to minimal, yet interesting ones like Pixld. Since there are 15 pages in the app’s theme downloader and even more around the ‘net, it seemed like a good idea to gather up the most fetching for Mac.AppStorm readers. Keep reading for ten of the best Bowtie themes out there.
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iTunes is probably one of the most used applications on Mac. It comes pre-installed, plays music well, and has the iTunes Store where many people shop for new music. It’s the way we manage our iPods, iPhones, and iPads, lets us watch movies, listen to music, and more. It’s priceless to many first-time Mac users, even if it does have a few flaws.

Of course, there are those who enjoy alternatives. While iTunes should still be used for syncing one’s library to an iPod or iOS device, a lot of third-party substitutes do a fine job of playing music and other content. A more beautiful way to play music is something the Mac could use — iTunes isn’t really the most aesthetically pleasing right now — and until the iTunes 11 update is released, why not take a look at the additional solutions? (more…)

Creative pursuits are getting easier and easier to go after these days, especially ones involving technology. For a long time, expensive software with steep learning curves has been prohibitive for newcomers to the world of digital creativity. Animation has long been a field affected by such problems – software from companies like Autodesk and Adobe runs hundreds if not thousands of dollars. This is certainly not something the amateur animator is going to be excited to invest in.

Luckily, a number of developers over the past couple of years have put out some great software for amateur animators. These programs allow you to make simple animations, stop-motion videos, time lapses and much more. The apps I’ve included are all under the $50 benchmark, with many available for $10 or less. Stick with me after the jump to learn about the great variety of software available for the home animator.

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This post is part of a series that revisits some of our readers’ favorite articles from the past that still contain awesome and relevant information that you might find useful. This post was originally published on September 9th, 2011

As you would expect from the editor of a Mac blog, I’m a complete app addict. I have random applications for everything from cataloguing recipes to counting characters in a TextEdit document. Some of these I use on a daily basis, but many of them admittedly sit and collect dust in my Applications folder.

This article is an attempt to narrow down my absolute bare essentials. What three things do I think are fundamentally lacking in OS X and would need to be installed on any machine that I use for more than a few hours, regardless of what I’m doing? Which apps genuinely save me a considerable amount of time in my daily routine? Let’s take a look!

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Over the past year, I’ve really upped my freelance work. That means I’m spending my time on my personal computer, rather than a work computer that I can’t customize. As such, I’ve been moving away from relying completely on web apps, and begun to explore more apps made for my mac.

One thing that I’ve been looking for was an app that would allow me to access my calendar without loading up a dedicated calendar app or using the Google Calendar web app. When I started searching for the perfect app, I knew I wanted a menu bar app, even if I didn’t know exactly what functionality I needed. I found and tried a ton of different applications. I chose three plus a bonus app to share with you, so stick with me after the jump to find the perfect menu bar calendar app to fit your needs.

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