Dear freelancer, listen up – this is important: You need to track your time and expenses. Nowhere is the axiom “time is money” more obviously true than in the life of a freelancer. If you don’t pay enough attention, you will find money dribbling away – in unbilled hours you spend on projects, and in the extras that you could be claiming (travel and other expenses). That’s where time-tracking software becomes useful.

I freelanced for a very long time before I ever used such an application, and my experience is that having one makes life a whole lot easier: I know where I’m spending my time; I’ve calculated hourly rates that work for me, so I know which projects are worth continuing with, and which I should set aside; and I’m easily able to generate good looking, professional invoices.

There are many different applications available for Mac users, as well as some great online options. I tried a few, before settling on Marketcircle’s Billings 3, which has been my time tracking app of choice for most of the past two years. Stunt Software released On The Job 3.0 a little over a year ago, and although it’s been mentioned a few times on Mac.AppStorm, we’ve never given it a proper review. So, with no further ado, join me after the jump, and I’ll tell you why I’m switching.


37signals are well known for their suite of productivity and collaboration web apps, designed to help people work efficiently and get things done. Although 37signals applications are designed primarily for use in the browser, a wide range of complimentary Mac and iPhone software has arisen in recent years.

This post will be offering a quick overview of each 37signals app: Basecamp, Backpack, Campfire and Highrise, before moving on to outline over 25 Mac and iPhone apps designed to work alongside them. You’ll be spoiled for choice!


Trying to stay on top of a business can be a very difficult task – whether you’re a freelancer, or manage several hundred staff. Without a system to keep everything well organised, it can be easy to miss deadlines and lose focus. Today I’ll be taking a look at Daylite, an impressive suite of tools for managing a business.

One of the main selling points behind Daylite is the ability to have everything related to your business in one central place: calendars, contacts, projects, tasks etc. Emphasis is also placed on sharing information, as Daylite is designed to work well in a collaborative setting.

This review will walk through the main features of Daylite/Daylite Touch and outline what I like and dislike about the application. It’s a mammoth piece of software, and it wouldn’t be possible to cover absolutely everything in one review. Instead, I’ll try to give you a feel for what the tool is capable of.

Disclaimer: Although Marketcircle (the developers of Daylite) sponsor AppStorm, our reviews are always completely impartial.


When it comes to task managing applications, I’ve tried them all. The Hit List, Things, Omnifocus etc. But I just couldn’t get myself into a system that worked. For a while I turned to .txt files. Simple and ultra-portable.

And then I found TaskPaper. TaskPaper is basically steroids-driven .txt file. After testing it for a while, I think I’ve found an application that will stick.


How often have you sat down at the computer with the best of intentions to complete a job, assignment, or task only to be distracted by incoming emails or instant messages etc. It happens all too often to me. Concentrate, by roobasoft, aims to solve this problem by allowing you to create ‘activities’ which can boost your performance by eliminating all of the unwanted distractions.

This review will cover what Concentrate has to offer, any problems, and a couple of alternative applications.


Every day you process loads of information: due dates, notes to self, phone numbers, and serial numbers to name a few. Almost all of this information is miscellaneous, and has no real place to go.

What usually happens is one of the following: a) Your desk is yellow from sticky notes or b) your computer’s desktop and your folder hierarchy are bogged down with the virtual post-it note, text files. What’s needed is an easy to follow system, that you can easily reference.

VoodoPad from Flying Meat Software is a text editor rolled into a personal wiki. It’s a place to dump all your information, no matter how obscure. File types are not an object either; pictures, folders, PDFs, URLs, and applications all can be put in your VoodooPad. This application is elastic, it can stretch to meet your needs, and shrink accordingly. (more…)

Today I’ll be reviewing a remarkably simple application, but one that can have a surprising impact on how you work when using your Mac. It’s called FuzzyClock, and is a menu bar tool for altering the way in which your Mac reports the time. Rather than a simple time such as 14.45, FuzzyClock would display “Wed, quarter past two”.

The review will take a look at the various preferences available within FuzzyClock, and investigate the impact it can have on how you work. I’ll also showcase a few other menu bar clock applications for displaying the time in a different fashion.


Time management is a constant battle for most people in their day-to-day lives. It is a vital part of any workflow, even more so those in which billing is dependent on time worked. Several applications make it easy to log, calculate, and even create invoices based on the information collected.

Most of the applications can also manage tasks associated with a project and can even assign project to individual clients that have specific needs. A delicate task, time tracking is crucial, after all, this is how you earn your money.


To-do lists have been around for a long time now. Thankfully, technology has led us into an age where it makes staying on top of things just a little bit easier than always reverting to pen and paper. There is a plethora of Mac apps out there that will get the job done as a to-do list manager.

However, a new, fresh approach comes in the form of an app known as SimpleTask. Today I’ll be taking a look at what SimpleTask is capable of, and whether it stands out from the crowd.


The Hit List is an excellent new Getting Things Done (GTD) application from Potion Factory. Many GTD applications suffer from an overly complex experience that leaves you spending your days creating and customizing your task list rather than completing it. The Hit List instead opts for a simple, streamlined interface void of clutter and big on productivity.

This review will cover the basic functionality of The Hit List as well as it’s major selling points and shortcomings. Keep in mind that The Hit List hasn’t reached version 1.0 yet, so anything lacking may be addressed before the official launch.


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