Fresh off the presses, here’s Mac AppStorm’s roundup of the very best app and Apple-related news and goings-on this week.

Happy reading!

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Tweetbot for Mac was just released and the Internet, at least the geeky parts thereof, was on fire as a result of this, but not for the reasons you would expect. Indeed, networks like Twitter and App.Net were overflowing with mentions of Tapbots’ first Mac app. In most cases, thought, the discussion was focused on the pricing of the app, not so much on its features and merits.

As of the time of writing, Tweetbot will set you back $20, an admittedly premium price for a Twitter client. But isn’t a quality app worth something, at least?
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Poor OS X. It doesn’t have Siri, even though it does have Siri’s voice detection. It doesn’t support any Minority Report-style gestures like Microsoft’s Kinect, even though it does have great touchpad gestures. It’s filled with great features, just none of those headline-grabbing features that make it look like something from the future.

It’s the App Store to the rescue again, this time with a little free menubar app named Flutter. It promises to bring some Kinect-style gestures to your Mac’s music apps, so you can walk up to your Mac, motion to start the music playing, and silence all the doubters saying that OS X isn’t the cool kid anymore.

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This post is part of a series that revisits some of our readers’ favorite articles from the past that still contain awesome and relevant information that you might find useful. This post was originally published on July 7th, 2011.

The Finder and I go way back: from my family’s ’96 Performa to my MacBook Pro, I’ve used it to navigate my Mac for well over a decade. Since the initial transition from OS 9 to OS 10, I would argue that the way we use the Finder has changed very little, and a lot of what has changed is purely aesthetic. Though I now have the option to browse through my files with Cover Flow or create smart folders, I still use the Finder in pretty much the same way as I did 10 years ago.

I’ve been very disappointed to see that the Finder hasn’t seen any major improvements in recent versions of OS X, but that doesn’t mean 3rd party developers aren’t hard at work to continue where Apple has left off. Cocoatech’s Path Finder has been around for quite some time and ambitiously tries to replace the Finder altogether to create a more modern, usable means of navigating your computer. Find out if Path Finder successfully replaces the ubiquitous Finder after the jump!
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Ever since the first, bug-riddled alpha version was released back in July, fans of the popular alternative Twitter client Tweetbot have eagerly been awaiting its proper release on the Mac. Today, the waiting game is over. Tapbots released the full version in the App Store after submitting it to Apple at the start of the month, and it’s extremely impressive.

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It’s always exciting to come across new, upcoming apps that seem exceptionally promising. That’s exactly what Records for Mac is. It’s an upcoming database app for the Mac that aims to make databasing much more accessible to everyone, with a graphical app that lets you quickly add and sync data, and more. That’s quite a lot to pull off, especially since most databasing apps are far from simple to use, so we were eager to learn more.

We were excited to get a chance to interview the Push Popcorn team about their work on Records, and what we can expect from it. Keep reading to hear about their workflow, the Macs and apps they use to build Records, and more.

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Apple introduced FaceTime on June 7, 2010, and released it with the iPhone 4 later that month. Later that year, Apple announced a Mac version of the service, but put it in beta and the final version was released in February 2011. People didn’t know what to think of this new way to communicate. Video chat was nice, yes, but most people use Skype, so what was the purpose of Apple’s own solution? To connect all Apple users with video chat, apparently.

The aim of FaceTime seems too simple, too limited. There wasn’t a lot of hype surrounding its launch because most people didn’t see themselves using it on a daily basis. What was this service lacking and what could it benefit from gaining? A few suggestions are available after the break. (more…)

In today’s day and age where mobility is essential, we’ve seen a huge proliferation of increasingly smaller laptops, led by the MacBook Air’s success. With smaller laptops come smaller screens. While this is great for mobility it does come with a cost. Screen real-estate!

Not everybody is fortunate enough to work on a big beautiful 27″ iMac or a shiny new Retina MacBook Pro (I know I’m not). Most, whether by choice or necessity, work on small screens, and more often than we realize find ourselves jugling windows around or Alt-Tabbing between them.

Thanks to SnappyApp, a delightfully simple app that’s proven to be oh so useful, this has mostly become a thing of the past for me. Read on to find out why.
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Our sponsor this week is Yate, the Mac audio tagging app for serious taggers. If you want an easy way to add more info to your music files than you can in iTunes, it’s an app you should be sure to check out.

Organizing and tagging your audio files can be very tedious and time consuming. Yate aims to make it much easier. It lets you import audio tagging info from MusicBrainz or Discogs, and can help you quickly add missing album art info. It lets you add more metadata to your songs than you ever could with iTunes or OS X’s File Info. Then, you can add these changes to all of your songs at once with Actions, saving you the time of manually updating each song in an album.

Best of all, Yate integrates with iTunes, and was recently updated to work with the latest iTunes updates, so it can automatically sync your song tags with your iTunes library. You can use it to tag all of your mp3, m4a, and FLAC files, and keep your library up to date at the same time. If you ever need to change or revert tags you’ve added, Yate can take care of that, too!

Go Get It!

If you’re ready to start getting serious about tagging your music files, be sure to download Yate and try it out. You can test it for free for 14 days, then purchase a license for $30 to keep using all of its features. And if you have any trouble getting it going, be sure to get in touch with the Yate team; they’re great at making sure their customers can get the most out of their app, as we found while writing our review.

Think you’ve got a great app? Sign up for a Weekly Sponsorship slot just like this one.

Welcome to this week’s issue of App Deals. There are a lot of great apps floating around the sales racks, including Boom, Typeli Notes, and Quake 4. Keep reading for the full list of deals. (more…)

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