Despite the technological advances of fingerprint scanners and retina displays, iOS devices can still only print to a very limited number of printers that support AirPrint. While more and more printers are adding this feature (and some manufacturers, such as Canon, are even providing updates to certain models to add AirPrint functionality), buying a whole new printer for a feature you’ll likely not often use just cost effective.

Printopia is an app that’s best known for serving as a gateway between your iOS device and your printer, providing a way to print to any Mac-compatible printer directly from your iOS device, free from the restraints of AirPrint. While most may be content with only this functionality, Printopia offers so much more for both Mac and iOS devices alike, especially to those looking for a paperless workflow.

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It’s been just over a week since OS X Mavericks was released, and yet our analytics show that over 40% of you have already upgraded to Mavericks. That’s quite the quick switch, but then, Mavericks being free made it an easy jump. Plus, it looks and works practically the same as Lion and Mountain Lion, on the surface anyhow, so there’s not really anything new to learn.

But there is a lot of new stuff under the hood — and even closer to the surface if you look around. There’s the new tags and tabs in Finder, iBooks, Maps, and a new version of Calendar and Contacts without all the leather. Power users will love the new multiple display support, and developers have all kinds of new API goodies to play with. There’s even new fonts, and AppleScript support for Reminders of all things.

But sometimes, the things we thought were most exciting don’t end up being what we use the most. I was terribly excited over Finder Tabs, then ended up not using them nearly as much as I thought I would. iBooks, on the other hand, is my new go-to place for some inspiration and down-time distraction, and I’ve loved having it around as much as I thought I would. Apple even seems to think it’s a pretty big addition, and is featuring iBooks on the first screenshot in Mavericks’ App Store page.

So how about you? What’s your favorite feature in Mavericks after spending some time in it? We’d love to hear how you’re using the new Mavericks features in your work and play!

I always want to make working on my Mac easier, and I’m never disappointed when I find an application that does that. Fast Toggles isn’t itself really an application, though, but a collection of small applications that each performs one small function each. These are all things that are often used but can take some digging to reach. Fast Toggles puts them in one place and makes them a lot easier to get at. Is Fast Toggles that much faster, though, or just a waste of time? (more…)

There’s notebook apps to store all your text snippets, ideas, notes, outlines, and anything else you can think of. They’re designed to make it easy to save notes, and easy to search through and find the note you need later. There’s plain writing apps, that strip away all the distractions and help you focus on your writing. And then there’s the export tools page layout apps that help you publish your finished work.

And then, there’s the new Ulysses III 1.1. Ulysses III reinvented what it meant to be a plain-text writing app when it was released this spring, and the new v1.1 update adds advanced search and improves external file and export support enough that it’s a notebook, focused writing, and publishing app rolled into one. It’s the one app modern writers need.

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My Mac is essentially always on, because I always have apps running and browser tabs open. If I shutdown my laptop, that means all of that gets closed, which I’m okay with. What I’m not okay with is having to open all of it back up again. It took me ages to find all of those panda cam video screenshots; am I just supposed to do all of that “research” again? No thanks!

What I need is an app that will save all of my open windows, tabs and applications and open them back up for me when I’m ready. Cupcloud says it can do just that, so I gave the beta a try. I’ll let you know how it goes and whether it’s worth a download. >

The Activity Monitor in OS X Mavericks has been nicely redesigned, but it’s still far from enough for anyone who wants to keep up with their Mac’s real-time stats. For a detailed overview of how your Mac is actually performing, you’ll ideally need the stats you want in your menubar or in a condensed window that shows just the stats you want to see together. That’s why you need Colossus, our sponsor this week.

Colossus is an advanced system monitor for your Mac that makes it simple to keep on top of the most important stats. For just $3.99, it lets you keep tabs on your Mac’s CPU activity, memory, download and upload speeds, battery, storage, and temperatures with an optional addon in your menubar, a floating window, or a customizable dock icon. You can keep track of as few or as many stats as you want, in the places you want.

No matter what stats you pick to be shown in the menubar and Colossus’ animated Dock icon, you can always jump into all of your Mac’s stats from the app’s full-featured floating window view that can optionally float over every other app on your desktop. There, you’ll find collapsing views that show your summary stats for every part of your Mac at a glance with more detailed info on click. Combine that with the customizable menubar and dock icon, and you’ve got the perfect monitoring app for your Mac.

Get a Copy of Colossus Today!

Colossus is a brilliant and simple way to keep up with your Mac’s stats, and it’s far cheaper than the competition while including the features and performance you need. Get your copy of Colossus from the Mac App Store for just $3.99, and start keeping up better with how your Mac and internet connection are performing.

Think you’ve got a great app? Sign up for a Weekly Sponsorship slot just like this one.

We’ve just closed our giveaway; congrats to our winners Alex, Valter, dion, Nuri, and jdnorthwest!

Apple spoiled us all last week by releasing OS X Mavericks and the new iLife and iWork apps all for free. That should have freed up some of your pennies to get some great indie apps for your Mac — and we’ve got a great bundle to share where you can get a ton of apps for said pennies.

Paddle’s newest Pay What You Want bundle includes 16 apps that are ready for your Mac with OS X Mavericks, including the Bits diary app we’ve just reviewed and Shortcat, the awesome keyboard shortcut app that was developed by a former Envato team member. There’s more, too: MenuEverywhere to get your Mac menus right inside your apps, Focus to improve your photos, Code Collector Pro to backup your code snippets, Slink to securely connect to remote networks, and more. All that for the low price of whatever you’d like to pay.

Or, you could get it for free, since we have 5 of the bundles to giveaway. Just comment below and let us know what apps you’d like most in this bundle to enter — then share the giveaway on your favorite social networks and leave another comment with a link to your shared post for an extra entry.

Hurry and get your entry in — the giveaway closes on Friday, November 1st!

Envato staff or those who have written more than two articles or tutorials for AppStorm are ineligible to enter.

I take a lot of pictures — not just professionally, but also for fun. That being said, I don’t think there’s such a thing as a “perfect” image editor. I’ve tried everything over the years, some of which I’ve reviewed here on Mac.AppStorm, but I have yet to run into one tool that can singlehandedly replace all the others.

But when MacPhun, the folks behind Snapheal, reached out to me, I was intrigued. Their newest app, Intensify Pro, looked like it could be a real game-changer, and I was eager to put it through its paces. Read on to find out if Intensify really brings anything new to the table.

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It wasn’t so long ago that the majority of internet users would connect via dial-up modem. Back in those days, download managers were a necessity since there was nothing worse than spending days downloading a file, only for it to be interrupted because someone picked up the phone in another room. Nowadays, with widespread access to high-speed internet and the fact that browsers have become a lot smarter over the years in resuming unfinished downloads, download managers have all but faded into obscurity.

But the light hasn’t gone out completely for download managers and one such app, Folx, does more than simply download files. After spending a few days with it, I’ve found myself remembering why download managers were just so useful.

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Update: And like that, Apple has updated Mail.app to mitigate the Gmail issues. Here’s to hoping it fixes everyone’s problems!

Did you, like me, rush out and update your Mac to run Mavericks? And did you just love the tabbed finder, added notifications and all of the other goodies? And did you then open Apple Mail, listen to the fan crank up to max and wonder why it showed 130% CPU usage in Activity Monitor?

Turns out that you’re not the only one. There’s been a shift in the way that Apple Mail handles Gmail accounts in Mavericks 10.9, and since tons of people use Gmail for their primary accounts, there’s a big problem on hand. TidBITS was the first to point it out (and that’s a great place to read the technical reasons why it’s broken), but today it’s a huge issue that needs to be fixed. Now. (more…)

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