If you have a Mac, chances are you didn’t even consider other computers because you wanted one that runs OS X. Apple makes great hardware, but it’s the great software with great hardware that makes a Mac. Even still, there’s many times you might need to run another operating system. From running an Access database for work in Windows or testing out a Linux server config locally, there’s many reasons you still might want to run another OS on your Mac.

Thankfully, there’s many choices. There’s the built-in Boot Camp, which gives you a free way to run other operating systems directly on your Mac. Then, there’s a number of virtualization tools to let you run other OSes on top of OS X, including the newly updated VMware Fusion and Parallels desktop, as well as the free open source VirtualBox.

That’s why we’re curious: how do you run other operating systems on your Mac? Or are you just fine only using OS X? We’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments below!

Have you been staring at the same drab wallpaper for weeks? Are you starving for some new wallpapers and backgrounds. Do you need something to spruce up your iPad and show off the gorgeous screen? Look no further.

Here are some fantastic wallpaper roundups, there’s something for everybody!

Mac apps have gotten away from being highly customizable, sticking instead to a curated set of defaults that often lean towards clutter-free interfaces like most writing apps, or the skeuomorphic designs Apple prefers today. But the highly customizable apps aren’t gone completely.

Today, we’ve had the chance to interview the team behind Calendar Plus, a highly customizable calendar app for the Mac that’s been surprisingly popular on the App Store. Read on to hear their thoughts about developing for the Mac and designing customizable apps. (more…)

Ever get nostalgic for 8-bit gaming, but don’t want to play an old game in Dosbox? Shaun Imman‘s critically acclaimed The Last Rocket was a hit on the iPhone when it launched last year, earning 10 stars in our own review.

The Last Rocket has just recently been released for the Mac, and I was eager to try it out as soon as I saw it in the App Store. Spoiler: it was every bit as good as I expected.

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This week has been yet another busy one in the world of app news so without further ado, let’s get started!

Happy reading! (more…)

Cooking at home has become a lost art due to the omnipresence of diners, fast-food restaurants, and the surplus of other ways to eat out. I’m not bashing great food that others can prepare, but why don’t you fire up that oven sometime to make some cobbler? If that seems too complicated, there’s always the stovetop which can cook caramel for popcorn this evening — it’s a great accompaniment to the film you’re planning to watch with your significant other.

Okay, enough of my urging you to prepare the delectable. If you happen to cook things even on occasion, I’m sure you keep a folder with recipes in it, if not a tactile book in your cupboard. What if I told you that there’s an easier way to organize things using Michael Göbel’s Recipes app on your Mac? Yes yes, you want to know more. Well then let’s get started. (more…)

We’d like to say a special Thank you! to our weekly sponsors from the past month, for sponsoring our site and for the great apps they make. If you would like to feature your app on our site with an advertisement, be sure to check out our available slots on BuySellAds or register for a weekly sponsorship for your app.

If you haven’t already checked out our the great apps that sponsored our site last month, be sure to check them out now!

ANTETYPE

Designing user interfaces can be challenging, but it doesn’t have to be. ANTETYPE includes pre-designed UI elements for OS X and iOS, as well as Android and Windows, so you can design customized apps that look great any platform. It features a smart layout and responsive widgets that make it quick to apply your changes to your whole app design. It might be just what you’re looking for to speed up your app design process.

Onde iTunes Converter

If you’ve purchased iTunes music for years, chances are you have some older songs with DRM protection. Rather than pay per song to get rid of the DRM, you could just get Onde iTunes Converter to quickly convert all of your songs to unprotected formats. Best of all, you can use it to convert any audio or video you have into the audio format you want, so you can play the music you own anywhere.

Pixelmator

The leading Mac-only image editor continues to lead the way with innovative new features a year after winning an Apple Design Award. Pixelmator now supports iCloud, includes retina display graphics, and a host of new image effects that make it easy to tweak your pictures. You can now make a miniature scene and more with only a couple clicks in Piexlmator’s new effects browser. It’s easily the best alternate to Photoshop on the Mac.

Chronicle

It’s tough to stay on top of all of your bills and make sure they’re paid on time, but paying your bills on time can be crucial to maintaining your credit score. That’s where Chronicle comes in. It makes it easy to remember when your bills need paid, with push notifications and recurring bill support. Its latest version even has retina display graphics, so it’ll look great on any Mac!

And a special thanks to you, our Mac.AppStorm.net readers, for reading and sharing our articles. We couldn’t do it without you!

Think you’ve got a great app? Sign up for a Weekly Sponsorship slot and join the apps above.

Kids love to use computers. That’s a fact. Even babies love to press buttons and see things happen. I completely believe that once a child is ready, they should be given access to a computer with quality “grown-up” software and the ability to really utilize the computer with less restrictions. Until they reach that age, however, you probably need some sort of solution to prevent your child from completely screwing up your computer.

Luckily, a number of apps exist that are great to include in the user account for your children. This roundup includes child-friendly browsers, games for learning and for fun and even apps to create digital content. Stick with me after the jump to learn more about some of the most popular apps out there for kids.

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This post is part of a series that revisits some of our readers’ favorite articles from the past that still contain awesome and relevant information that you might find useful. This post was originally published on August 2nd, 2011.

A few weeks ago, I wrote an article about text-to-speech in OSX, and one commenter suggested I check out Repeat After Me, a text-to-speech utility hidden in the Developer folder.

While checking it out, I discovered that the Developer folder holds a stash of useful applications and utilities I’d never heard of before. I’ve found some real gems while digging through Developer Tools, including some utilities that I now use on a regular basis. Let’s go hunting for burried treasure!

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The CD data disk came as a revolution when it arrived. Before the most common storage method was still the 3.5″ floppy disk that held only 1.4 MB. The size of programs was rapidly increasing and many popular programs already came on a dozen or more disks and a bad floppy disk was all too common. The arrival of the CD made larger programs and games not just easier, but possible in the days when dial up Internet was still the norm. The DVD soon followed and increased the amount of data on a single disk to 4.7 GB and also brought the digital movie to the computer user.

Installing software now most often comes from a download, whether from the Mac App Store or the vendor’s web site. The DVD adds space and weight that can seem unnecessary. Apple now shows no concerns about removing the drive to shrink the size of their computers. The MacBook Air doesn’t come with a DVD drive to save space and the new MacBook Retina also removed the DVD drive. The trend is clear that Apple considers these drives to be unimportant and best relegated to an external drive in the rare times it’s needed.

Still, computer users can’t quite completely ignore the CD and DVD yet. Most boxed software, which now is relegated to mainly large suites like Microsoft Office or Creative Suite, still comes on a DVD or CD. While digital downloads of both movies and music are the future, many of us also have DVD or Blu-ray movie collections and even (gasp) CD music collections that we’d like to bring with us to the digital world. Here we’ll look at a few programs either included with your Mac or freely available that will help you deal with those physical disks still lying around. An external DVD drive will allow you to get anything on those disks to you Mac with the programs below.

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