Posts Tagged

apple

Apple’s 2013 Worldwide Developer Conference starts on Monday, June 10th. By this time a week from now we’ll already have seen what Tim Cook and the rest of the Apple team have prepared to show the world. The whole world — not just techies this time — is anticipating iOS 7, but there should be a lot more interesting stuff.

There’s OS X, of course: it’d be tough to forget that here at Mac.AppStorm. Apple’s committed to a yearly upgrade cycle for OS X, and Mountain Lion was released at the end of July last year. That should mean that we’ll get word of the stuff coming to OS X v.NeXT.

There’s also Apple’s own apps, from iLife and iWork to their pro tools, all of which seem far overdue for a new version. There’s iCloud, which almost every developer would like to see improved. There’s also the iOS apps like iBooks that have never made their way to the Mac, even though they seem like perfect fits.

Then, there’s hardware. Apple hasn’t updated the Mac Pro in forever, and the rest of its lineup is likely due at least for a spec bump. And none of us would mind if Apple decided to release some brand-new, non-rumored hardware like a new addition to the Mac lineup.

We’d all like to see all of the above, I’m sure, but what do you want to see most? Is iOS mostly on your mind, or are you hoping for more Mac attention? We’d love to hear what you want to see at WWDC 2013 in the comments below.

And, stay tuned: our AppStorm team will be live-blogging the keynote speech, and we’ll have more to share about that later this week!

It’s been three years since making the big switch to the Mac, and within those thirty-six months I’ve tried numerous apps that have significantly changed the way I work. I’ve gotten my hands dirty with a variety of productivity tools, finance software, utilities, and photo/image editing apps of various shapes, colors, and file sizes that it’s taken me a while to actually find the apps that I can settle down with.

I’ve pretty much filled up fifteen pages of purchase history, but I’ve managed to find a couple of apps that have become integral to my workflow as a writer and an avid user of the web. These apps have won my loyalty, and I’m glad to be able to shine the spotlight on them in this week’s The Apps We Use feature.
(more…)

It’s been 29 years since Apple unveiled the original Macintosh, long enough that the Macs most of us use today would seem like science fiction compared to the original Macintosh. But the story of Apple doesn’t start with the Mac.

8 years earlier, Jobs and Wozniak demonstrated the Apple I, the computer that started it all, at the Homebrew Computer Club. Then, a year later, the Apple II was demonstrated, and it soon became one of the first computers to be released that was a mass success. The Macintosh came along, but it was still years before the Apple II computers had fully disappeared from Apple’s lineup.

My own first Apple computer (of sorts) was decidedly not a Mac. Instead, it was the one Apple device that seems to be the early predecessor of Apple’s real future as a mobile device company: the Newton.

So did you ever use an original Apple computer? If so, we’d love to hear about it in the comments below.

And if you’re curious what Macs your fellow AppStorm readers are using, our giveaway from last week turned into an impromptu poll about that!

After a slightly embarrassing setback to its development, iTunes 11 has finally been released by Apple after a month’s delay, bringing a whole new slew of features to the renowned music player. The new version was first announced at the iPhone 5 media event back in September, with a promised release date of October, however Apple decided that they needed “a little more time” to get it just right.

Well, it’s now available and ready for the world to see. Let’s take a quick peek inside and see what’s new. We will, of course, be getting a full review to you in the next couple of days :)

(more…)

In recent iterations of iOS — Apple’s mobile operating system for iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad — and in recent versions of OS X on the desktop, you will undoubtedly have noticed a move towards visual elements that mimic real-life objects. The ruled, yellow notepaper for the Notes app, the torn-paper effect at the top of the stitched, leather-bound Calendar app, and more are examples of this.

These software design elements mimicking real world objects have introduced a new word into our vocabularies: skeuomorphism. Such effects have, however, divided opinion, and it is just possible that we will see Apple shift away from these elements in future.

(more…)

On October 30th, as Hurricane Sandy was hounding the East Coast of the United States, Apple announced one of the biggest corporate reshuffles in their history, which some dubbed as the company’s biggest shake-up since Steve Jobs resigned from Apple in August 2011, shortly before his death from cancer in October. Soon after the announcement, however, it transpired that this was no ordinary reshuffle and the reasons for it were a lot more deep-rooted than we ever actually thought.

As an economist, this announcement caught my eye, not only because it’s Apple but really because I wanted to know exactly what actually happened and also how this restructuring will affect the company as a whole. Read on for my in-depth analysis.

(more…)

Hot and fresh off the presses, here’s Mac AppStorm’s weekly news roundup.

Enjoy!

(more…)

Skitch received a major upgrade to version 2.0 last September, taking the Mac community by storm—in a bad way.

Personally, I’m pretty open-minded towards app upgrades. I almost always welcome changes made to an app’s design and functionality, giving it the benefit of testing out the changes first before making any judgments. So, you can imagine how curious I was when I saw how version 2.0 enraged so many of Skitch’s users just after it was released. Did Evernote really push out an update that broke Skitch, a fine application, and made it clunky and unusable? (more…)

This morning, I woke up to a Reeder full of articles about Apple’s new announcements in yesterday’s keynote. Living in Asia makes it a bit tough to watch keynotes live, and Apple usually doesn’t even stream them live online. After reading through the articles and checking through Apple.com, I didn’t really feel the need to watch the full keynote. I enjoy watching Apple’s product launches, but this one felt like one I could skip. Incidentally, it turned into a very exciting keynote for Mac users, with new iMacs and Mac Minis, but still, I could find what I needed to know from Apple.com’s pages.

That said, I’ve watched tons of Apple keynotes over the years, especially while Jobs was still alive and doing his magic on stage. I’ve gone back and rewatched portions of old keynotes to see how Apple’s changed (ouch, the fonts in old keynotes hurts to look at), and listening to Jobs’ speeches from when he first came back to Apple gives a unique perspective on the company.

So how about you? Do you always watch Apple’s keynotes, or do you just pick choice ones to watch? Or have you never watched an keynote before (is that even possible)? We’d love to hear your thoughts below!

Apple has announced a whole host of new and upgraded products in their most anticipated announcement as of yet, which took place at the California Theatre in San Jose. The venue was a good choice for the announcement (especially given its ornate interior) and at 10 AM PST, Tim Cook took to the stage with all eyes on him.

Want to find out everything they announced? Read on for our full roundup.

NOTE: All images used in this post are reproduced with permission from Wired under the Creative Commons agreement. (more…)

Page 2 of 812345...Last »
theatre-aglow
theatre-aglow
theatre-aglow
theatre-aglow