Posts Tagged

browser

In the world of browsers, fortunes can change terribly fast. If you browsed at all in the '90's, you surely used Netscape, at least for a time. Then IE 6 was the only game in town, while the cool kids started switching to Firefox. Apple's Safari came along, and while it didn't seem as important at first, it became the #1 way people browse from phones and tablets thanks to iOS. And Chrome, built on Safari's Webkit foundation, became the most popular browser. IE still has enormous marketshare, but it lost the mindshare long ago.

All along, in the background, Opera has been the alternate browser that everyone forgot about. It's 15th version just got released — now powered by Chrome's fork of Webkit, of all things — but it's still little more than a blip on web browsing statistics. It's had mobile versions for longer than iOS and Android have been around — I originally used it on a Nokia Symbian device, and later used it on a Windows Mobile 5.1 phone, far before the iPhone was around, much less had native apps.

And yet, it's never become a popular browser. But with Opera 15, more developers like Evernote are making browser extensions for it, and it could just possibly become a more popular browser — but the odds are against it.

That's why we're wondering if you use Opera, or if you used it in the past. We'd love to hear your thoughts about the European browser that won't quit in the comments below.

Controlling music on an iPod has always been easy. The buttons are right there — there’s nothing more to it than that. When you look at most computers these days, that’s not the case. Some have media control buttons, some prefer to go with a special extra row of touch buttons, and others just don’t implement the idea into the keyboard well. Apple did it right with volume, play, pause, and skip buttons on the function row of its keyboards. The thing is, you can’t use those for, say, Pandora radio or YouTube because they’re in the browser.

Or can you? Tube Controller gives you full media key support for Google’s video website. Now let’s see how well that works compared to clicking and dragging. (more…)

If you test anything on the internet, and you have to do it in multiple browsers, you know what a pain that can be. You have to have a couple of computers on hand or be running Windows on your Mac. There are tools that make it all a bit easier, but nothing makes it entirely painless.

Sauce is trying to take the edge off a bit by adding support for nearly 100 browsers right on your Mac. How can this be? Devilry? Magick with a K? Maybe. We’ll find out and see if it weighs the same as a duck.

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Apple has released another update to Safari, version 5.1.4, which has a total of 83 improvements to its performance, stability and, most importantly, security. The renewed offering of Apple’s default browser, which was released on Monday via the Software Update, is available to OS X Snow Leopard and Lion users and clocks in at roughly 45 MB download size (depending on your OS).
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In Norse mythology, Sleipnir is the gray, eight-legged steed that Odin rides to Hel. In the world of technology, it’s an amazing web browser that you just have to try.

Though you may have never heard of it, Sleipnir has been around in various forms for years (it’s also on just about every operating system around). The latest version, Sleipnir 3 offers a truly unique and streamlined browsing experience optimized for OS X Lion. Join us as we dive in and check it out.

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Whether it’s at Starbucks, the mall or Motel 6, free WiFi hotspots are popping up everywhere. While you’re using those hotspots, you might unknowingly be giving away some seriously personal information to an opportunistic hacker or two, including your social network, email, and even your online banking account login credentials.

With personal information like that at risk, you might be tempted to stop using those free hotspots altogether, but an app called Cloak by Bourgeois Bits hopes to alleviate those risks by providing Mac users with a corporate grade VPN service built into a consumer level app. Read on to see if Cloak really is the perfect companion to public WiFi.

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Our featured sponsor this week is Raven, an innovative new web browser that turns your favorite sites into apps.

Our full review of Raven outlines how much I thoroughly enjoy using this amazingly unique site-specific browser. The app’s Smart Bar allows you to effortlessly switch between your favorite websites and web apps in a way that makes them feel almost native. There’s even a dedicated AppStorm Raven App!

Although the new Raven web browser is only in beta, during the past four weeks they have introduced 50 new apps into their Web App Shop and are about to surpass 175,000 web apps installed into the Smart Bar. This means that a Web App is added to the Smart Bar by someone every 15 seconds!

Grab the Free Download!

Raven is changing the way people interact with the web. With it, you’ll love using Facebook, Twitter and your other favorite sites in a whole new way. If you haven’t already, it’s time to jump on board and head over to the Raven Website to grab your copy of this awesome and completely free utility.

Think you’ve got a great app? Sign up for a Weekly Sponsorship slot.


A site-specific browser allows you to have the convenience of a dedicated desktop app wrapped around a website. You’ve seen these before and might even have a few Fluid or Prism apps sitting in your dock. Even so, you’ve never seen an app quite like Raven before.

This innovative browser attempts to be an all-in-one hub that turns your favorite sites into custom apps that sit in a sidebar. So what happens when a site-specific browser allows you to browse and save multiple sites? Does it become just a regular browser or something new and amazing? Read on to find out.

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As new technologies like HTML5 and CSS3 become more prevalent, your choice of browser is becoming more important than ever. Browsers differ not only on their overall UI experience and feature base, but also in their support of newer standards and practices in web development.

Today we want to know which side you stand on in the browser wars. Vote in the poll on the right and let us know which option you use most frequently. If your browser isn’t listed, write it in!

After you vote, leave a comment below defending your answer. Do you prefer Webkit or Mozilla browsers? Or perhaps you like the unique offerings of another system like Opera. We want to know!

As for me, I’ve been a Safari fan since the early days of the browser. I’ve done my fair share of skipping around though, I spent six months as a Camino user a few years ago and recently had extended experiences with Chrome and Rockmelt, in the end I’m not entirely sure why I end up back in Safari but I always do!

We’ve all seen and used “social browsers” in the past. The idea is nice but the result is often a bulky, awkward and cluttered browser that you wouldn’t dream of using full time.

Rockmelt is here to change that. This browser might be the first ever to successfully integrate the services you use most with a solid browsing experience, all snapped neatly on top of an app that you might already use every day.

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