Posts Tagged

css

There have been a number of tools and services to help make web development more efficient over the years, with CSS extensions such as Compass, LESS and SASS, that turn stylesheets into faux-programming languages, complete with variables. In addition to that, mobile is now the most popular way of accessing the internet, so it’s crucial to make website code and scripts as compact and efficient as possible.

CodeKit, by Incident 57, describes itself as “steroids for web developers” and, after using it for some time, I wholeheartedly agree.

(more…)

Web development — and app development — is an ever-growing industry. Over at ThemeForest, there are thousands of website themes available because developers spend time coding them. But it’s not easy to construct one of those masterpieces. It takes knowledge, effort, and the right tools.

Here at Mac.AppStorm, we try to make sure you know about the latest and greatest in software machinery. The best software tools. Today I’m going to introduce you to ten of the best code and markup editors available on the Mac, from free feature-packed apps to paid workhorses. They’re first and foremost designed to help you code and write markup, but most are customizable enough that they can be great writing apps, too.

Let’s jump right in.

(more…)

As a web designer, slicing a mockup or exporting optimized images can be some of the most annoying and time-consuming tasks you must undertake. Granted, some designers and developers don’t do any “slicing,” but at some point, the need to allocate images becomes necessary. Whether that image is part of an element’s background or a slide for a slider, slicing it, exporting it, and optimizing it can take you a some time – unless you decide to get Enigma64, that is.

Enigma64 is a Photoshop plug-in that addresses not only slicing, exporting, and optimizing images, but it also gives you the ability to use Base64 as a method of exporting your optimized image. If your workflow includes some of these steps, follow us after the break to learn more about this incredibly useful plug-in.

(more…)

Time’s a very limited resource, and most of us are looking for ways to share extra minutes off our work whenever we can. Whether it’s with a text-expanding app, a web app, or a snippet library, there’s tons of ways software can speed you up, and it’s always great to find new ways to make your computer help you save time.

More often than not, though, these solutions are all over the place, and while they offer a speedy way to get the results you want, they aren’t very intuitive. For example, there are plenty of web apps out there that allow you to get CSS3 gradients, but in order to get exactly what you want, some require you to edit the code after you’ve mess around with its interface. So, wouldn’t it be cool if you could do it all from one application that you are already using? Wouldn’t it be cool to get almost-perfect results?

Of course it would. That’s why we were excited about CSS Hat. CSS Hat is not an app or a web app, but rather a Photoshop extension that’ll help you concentrate in your code and design rather than worry about vendor prefixes and RGBA vs HEX or the like. We don’t usually review Photoshop extensions, but since many of our readers use Photoshop and need an easier way to make CSS on their Macs, we thought you’d enjoy seeing our thoughts on our review copy of CSS Hat. (more…)

This post is part of a series that revisits some of our readers’ favorite articles from the past that still contain awesome and relevant information that you might find useful. This post was originally published on December 20th, 2011.

If you’re a fan of CSS preprocessors, then you know that despite their usefulness, they can be a bit of a pain to work with at times. Most of them require some sort of Terminal voodoo to compile, which immediately scares off a good portion of potential users.

As always, the Mac development community has come to the rescue with some amazing tools that completely take the effort out of the process. Follow along as we take a look at five great apps that will help you work with LESS, Sass, Stylus and even some non-CSS languages like CoffeeScript and HAML.

(more…)

If you’re a web developer, then you know that manually creating image sprites is a pain. Even worse is the process of trying to position those sprites just right within your CSS. It’s a necessary evil, but don’t you wish you could skip it?

Today we’re going to take a look at a Mac app called SpriteRight that promises to completely automates this process. Will it successfully turn sprite creation into an easy and even enjoyable task? Read on to find out.

(more…)

The Mac text editor market is rapidly heating up. Hot off the heels of an awesome Espresso update, we’re all anxiously awaiting the arrival of the next Coda, Textmate and even a new Mac-friendly Sublime Text. With such important and revered players each on the verge of their next great achievement, it’s going to be difficult for any newcomers to make a name for themselves.

Despite this high barrier to entry, Chocolat is a new text editor currently in alpha that’s definitely making a solid statement. Read on to see why it may be just what you’ve been waiting for.

(more…)

With the multiple common web browsers these days, designing websites that work on all of them can be a strain, especially when they each read CSS in different ways. Even if you’re not someone who creates websites, you’ve no-doubt heard the complaints of many a web coder about the different formats for the multiple web browsers.

JumpZero pounced on the opportunity to create what they call “the missing link between web designers and colors,” and at a launch sale of just $4.99, I think they may just have found it. Head past the break to get an in-depth look at Gradient.

(more…)

Web developers rejoice, Espresso 2 has finally been released and it brings tons of improvements that you’ll definitely want to check out.

Join us was we take a refreshed look at what Espresso is, what’s new about it and why it’s officially at the top of our list of awesome apps that web developers should have.

(more…)

If you’re a developer, you’ve probably come across a few snippet managers before. If you haven’t prepare to have your life become a whole lot easier.

For those that are familiar with the idea of saving small sections of code, you’ll definitely want to check out Snippets, an amazing snippet manager that will be an instant must-have for anyone looking to improve or build a personal code database. Below we’ll go over what Snippets is and how to use it to improve your workflow. Then we’ll discuss how it performed during our review process and whether or not you’ll be able to find a decent free alternative. Let’s get started!

(more…)

Page 1 of 212
theatre-aglow
theatre-aglow
theatre-aglow
theatre-aglow