Posts Tagged

droplr

Simple file sharing services are great for sharing all types of files — from code snippets to short notes to ready-to-publish PDFs — but most of the time, they’re only used for sharing images. That’s a shame, though. Most of us often need to share text that’s longer than a tweet but that’d make no sense to put into a blog post, and simple file sharing apps are great for that.

Except, they still make it rather difficult to share text. You have to write it in an app, save it to a file, the drag it to your sharing tool of choice. Plus, there’s no way to edit your text once it’s shared, without deleting the original share, editing your original text on your Mac, then re-uploading and re-sharing the text.

Sharing text should be far simpler, which is why Levi Nunnink from the Droplr team just built the brand-new MarkDrop app. It makes sharing text via Droplr — and editing text you’ve already shared — as simple as saving a document in iCloud. It’s brilliant.

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Droplr‘s been a crowd-favorite way to quickly share files from your Mac’s menubar for years, one that’s one many over including myself. Its basic file-sharing service is fast and customizable with a pro account, and its apps are far more powerful while staying as simple to use as its competition. And now, it’s taking steps to take its pro accounts beyond basic file sharing.

The brand-new Droplr Draw is the first step towards that new future. With the latest v3.5 update to Droplr’s app, you’ll find an included basic annotation app to quickly markup and share images on Droplr. Either select the new Capture & Draw Screenshot option in the menubar app, or press Alt+Shift+4 to directly select an area of the screen (or additionally press your spacebar and select a window) and capture a screenshot that’ll then be opened directly in the Droplr Draw app. (more…)

CloudApp and Droplr have been the two main ways most of us quickly share one-off files from our Macs. They’re so simple to use, it’s hard to find a reason not to keep one of them around. But then, they’re so similar, it’s tough to pick between the two.

I’ve used CloudApp for years now, even sticking with it after digging deeply into the differences between the two apps. But recently, I’ve switched to Droplr. Their new Mac app and iOS apps are so nice, it’s hard not to switch to Droplr once you’ve tried it again.

The new Droplr for Mac

The new Droplr for Mac

I wrote about the reasons I switched to Droplr, and why you should give it a shot, over on Web.AppStorm. Check out the full article for the scoop on why, right now, Droplr is the best simple way to share files.

Continue Reading on Web.AppStorm…

There's tons of apps for sharing files, and tons of ways to store your files in the cloud. It's almost unusual to go a couple weeks without hearing of yet another app for quick file sharing. And yet, two apps have stood the test of time and continued to be the flag-bearers for simple file sharing: CloudApp and Droplr.

Both CloudApp and Droplr have been with us for years, both have a simple menubar for quickly sharing files, and both have free and pro accounts. They're equally simple to use, and practically unrivaled in their simplicity. They were both so close of competitors, I decided they were both almost equal in my point-by-point comparison of their features for Web.AppStorm. Yet, I remained a CloudApp devotee until very recently.

Droplr finally won me over with its relentless improvements, making their Mac app and most recently iOS apps far nicer than before. Throw in the already-nicer web app, and the extra stats and customizations available with their pro account, and Droplr sold me on a pro subscription.

But then, there's another elephant in the room: Dropbox. It's decidedly not the simpler way to share one-off files, but it's something many of us already pay for, and it works great for sharing larger files. Then, with new apps like Share Bucket, you can make Dropbox act almost like Droplr or Dropbox. I love Dropbox, and store most of my files in it, but sharing small files and such from Dropbox still seems like too much of a hassle, and I'm glad to use Droplr for sharing and Dropbox for syncing everything else.

So, how about you? Are you in the CloudApp or Droplr camp, or is Dropbox enough for your needs? We'd love to hear your thoughts on the two — nay, three — apps in the comments below.

Ever wanted a simpler way to share files with Dropbox, Skydrive, or Google Drive? After all, with each of them, you can get tons of storage for free or cheap, and odds are you’re already using one of them to keep your files in sync anyhow. Why not use them instead of signing up for something like Droplr or CloudApp?

There’s a lot of reasons, really. For one, Droplr and CloudApp let you drag-and-drop files from your desktop or any Finder folder to directly share from your menubar, whereas with Dropbox or other services you’d have to add files to your folder first, then get a link, which is more time and steps. Then, there’s no simple way to take a screenshot and upload the file in one step.

That’s where Share Bucket comes in, with its drag-and-drop sharing from the cloud storage service of your choice. It’s not perfect, but it does make sharing files a lot quicker without CloudApp or Droplr.

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One of my favourite things about App.net, apart from its fantastic user core, is its wide open API. The folks at ADN are genuinely interested in ensuring that third-party developers can make great products using the site’s features, and sometimes, there are apps that come along that are so genuinely interesting they make me question how I ever doubted the social network in the first place.

One of the other great features of ADN lies in its storage capabilities. Each free account gets 500MB of storage with a 10MB file-size limit, while each paid account gets 10GB of storage with a 100MB file-size limit. I think that even the free account’s offering is really generous. Combine ADN’s open API with its storage capabilities, and you end up with ingenious little Mac gems like Swing. (more…)

Offloading PSDs and other digital art for a price is an art in itself. There are so many different ways to distribute your unique creations that things can get crowded. Stock digital art is a popular thing on the Internet and there are many who would pay for a unique, well-designed item. I’ve personally been a supporter of Envato’s own GraphicRiver or AudioJungle for the delivery of said items, but there are more apt solutions than these — you just have to look for them.

And that’s where Folio makes its grand entrance. If you want a quick way to upload your art, whether it’s a user interface for an iPhone app, vectors, or even audio, this could just be the best tool for the job. Unfortunately, it’s invite-only right now and they took a good month to send me one. That’s not to say you shouldn’t try it though; I’ll take a deeper look after the break. (more…)

CloudApp and Droplr are two apps that perform the same basic function. Both allow you to drag items from almost anywhere in OS X to a menu bar icon that instantly triggers an upload and copies a sharing link to your clipboard.

This is simply a fantastic model for effortless sharing that I personally use every day. The part that I’m not completely convinced about is which app is the best for this type of activity. I’ve used both extensively and find that they both are really solid apps with a lot going for them. Here are some of the things that they both do well: allow for several different types of uploads, let you browse an online web app of past uploads, and provide a public API for integration with third party apps.

That being said, I can easily point out areas where one is better than the other. The following are just a few of the many examples. For starters, CloudApp doesn’t put any ads on the page that hosts the shared content while Droplr does. However, Droplr generates nice short links and CloudApp generates big ugly links (CloudApp’s links are nice and short if you turn on public links). Further, Droplr has support for code sharing with syntax highlighting and CloudApp does not. CloudApp counters again with the ability to automatically upload screenshots taken with the default OS X keyboard shortcuts while Droplr forces you to memorize a new shortcut. Finally, Droplr also has an iOS app while CloudApp is only for the Mac.

Cast your vote in the poll and then leave a comment below letting us know why you think one app is better than the other. Have you tried both apps? Which features do you think are most important?

Thank you to everyone who filled out a copy of our survey to win a Droplr invite. We had over 1,000 responses, and got some great insight into what you like and dislike about AppStorm!

I’ve randomly selected 20 respondents as winners, and am pleased to announce that the results are in!

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We took you through a preview of sharing files with Droplr last week, and I’m pleased to say that we now have 20 invites to give away! It’s a great file sharing service, designed specifically for the Mac.

Entering is really simple – all you need to do is fill in our quick survey (it only takes 30 seconds). It contains a few brief questions about what you’d like to see on the site, and will help to give us an idea of how to make AppStorm even better! We’ll randomly select the 20 winners in a week’s time, on Wednesday 4th November.

Good luck, and I’m really looking to reading your responses!

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