Posts Tagged

flash

Flash died in 2007, and everyone’s been catching up since then. It’d long since been the worst part of the web, responsible for buzzing fans and auto-playing audio, but it took the advent of modern touch devices to make it outdated for good. That didn’t mean animated websites were gone along with Flash, though — it only meant we’d need more creative solutions.

Into the void came Hype, the Mac app that made it easy to create web-ready animations with just HTML, CSS, and Javascript — but without any coding. It brought drag-and-drop simplicity back to online animations. And now, just over 2 years after it was introduced, Hype 2 is here and is better than ever. It’s the simplest way to make interactive and animated content for the web — indeed, it’s as simple as making a Keynote presentation.

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If there’s one thing that consistently impresses me about my iPhones, iPads and Android devices, it’s how fast they are. My iPhone 5 in particular whizzes through web content, churning out video like butter on cellular or WiFi networks with ease. My 2008 iMac and 2012 15″ Retina MacBook Pro are both slower than I’d like when it comes to Internet use, sometimes slower than the iPhone at this point. And I’ve been looking for ways to speed them up.

Going Flash-less seemed to be the easiest answer. I’ve wanted to get Flash under control on my Macs for a while, to the point where I avoided installing it for months on the MacBook Pro. I find it just bogs up the whole system. That being said, Flash can be a necessary evil for many of us. So I’ve set out to find the best Flash alternatives for your Mac, and I’m happy to share some of the results with you now. (more…)

Through the MacBook Air, Apple has pioneered the everyday use of flash storage as an alternative to traditional hard drives. With the inevitable discontinuation of the pre-2012 MacBook Pros, Apple’s MacBook lineup will go completely flash-based and it looks as if the desktop Mac is going that way to… well, kind of.

At their October special event, Phil Schiller announced Fusion Drive, a new storage technology available for configurations of Apple’s late 2012 Mac Minis and iMacs. Fusing together flash and traditional storage, Apple aims to create a faster storage medium that still offers up a large capacity. In this article, we’re going to run through the basics of Fusion Drive, the technologies behind it and what it means for the future of storage on your Mac. (more…)

With WWDC coming up tomorrow, I’m sure I can speak for every reader here that we’ll all excited to hear what Apple is going to announce! Kevin over at iPhone AppStorm will be live blogging the main announcement on their Twitter account and we here at Mac AppStorm will bring you full news coverage and some more in-depth analysis afterwards.

In other Apple news this week…

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Much has been written about Apple’s decision to no longer ship the MacBook Air with Flash pre-installed, and while there are plenty of arguments for and against this, there’s plenty of evidence to suggest that uninstalling Flash can dramatically improve your browsing experience and battery life.

Apple themselves have stated that Flash is the number one cause of crashes in Safari, and—if you’ve ever watched a YouTube video on your MacBook—you’ll know that all the system fans kicking in can’t be good for your battery life.

Unless you spend a great deal of time designing or visiting Flash websites, you should definitely try uninstalling it for a few days. I have, and I won’t be going back in a hurry.

Fortunately, there are a few simple workarounds to make the transition easier and still allow you to use Flash when you really need to.

John Gruber posted a great article on this topic a few weeks ago, explaining that even after installing Flash system-wide, it’s still available in Google Chrome (as it has its own self-contained Flash plugin). For the few times I need Flash on a day-to-day basis, this workaround is more than reasonable for me.

I’ve noticed a far quicker browsing experience, and found that many sites actually serve alternative content when they discover you don’t have Flash installed. This is more notable than when you’re running ClickToFlash, and uninstalling Flash altogether is a more honest process than tricking websites into letting ClickToFlash handle this type of content.

Is this something you’ve tried on your own machine? If not, I’d strongly recommend giving it a go, even if just for a few days! Have your say in the poll above, and let me know your thoughts in the comments.

With the use of tiny USB flash-drives becoming increasingly common in our lives, it is scary how heavily we rely on these not so reliable storage devices. They can go missing, get stolen, or just pack it in and die. And if you haven’t backed up all your files from it, then this can be really devastating.

But few people remember to regularly backup so here’s an easy tutorial on how to get your computer to automatically backup your flash-drive for you. Following this, you should be able to rest assured that everything is safe. This how-to uses SilverKeeper, a free backup application made by Lacie.

This article will also show you how to make backups happen as soon as you mount your flash-drive using Do Something When, and a basic Automator workflow. Without further ado, let’s get started!

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