Posts Tagged

fluid

App.net is an up and coming social network and microblogging service that’s proving to be a worthy competitor to Twitter, with features such as being completely ad-free and an increased character count (256 characters compared to Twitter’s 140). Instead of generating revenue via ads, App.net users pay a small subscription charge to use the service. App.net user numbers have increased dramatically over the last few weeks ever since it launched a free tier service, allowing these paid subscribers to send out invitations for others to join the service with limited accounts, free of charge. Essentially, App.net became a freemium service.

Although the network is still fairly new, there has been active development of App.net clients for the Mac and in this roundup we look at five of the best apps currently available. And if you’re not on App.net yet, keep reading for a shot at some free App.net accounts we have to giveaway! (more…)

Todoist—the popular online task management app—recently came out with a Mac desktop app available through the Mac App Store. The app is free, so I gave it a test run. While the app does have a couple of nice features such as a quick add shortcut and a menu bar icon that shows the number of due and overdue tasks, I quickly reverted to using Todoist with Fluid.

In case you haven’t heard, Fluid is a great utility that allows Mac users to turn any web app into a de facto desktop app, or Fluid App. Read on to discover my handy Todoist/Fluid set-up, as well as some other use cases for Fluid.

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If you’ve been a Mac user for a while, then you’ve probably heard of Fluid. It’s a simple tool that lets you make websites feel like actual apps, with their own webkit-powered window and dock icon. You can customize icons, save userscripts for individual sites, and more. It’s quite the useful app if you use web apps often.

I’ve been using it more frequently lately to replace the Twitter clients I used to have on my Mac. Why, you ask? Well, there are a few reasons. Join me after the break for an example of how you can use Fluid to make your experience with Twitter and other apps on the Internet more up-to-date and smooth.

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Site-specific browsers (SSBs) are web browsers that allow you to focus on specific sites. The benefit is that you can easily turn web applications like Gmail and Facebook into a neatly wrapped app that sits in your dock. This separates these apps out from your normal browser and allows you to run them independently.

Today, we want to know which SSB you prefer. Is the the tried and true Fluid browser or its popular alternative Mozilla Prism? Both offer similar functionality and easily allow you to create standalone applications for web apps. Or perhaps you prefer Raven, the newcomer in the SSB game. Raven has some unique tricks up its sleeve and is quite unlike any other app. Instead of creating standalone dock apps, Raven uses a sidebar with dedicated shortcuts and custom controls for all your favorite sites. There’s even a free AppStorm Raven app!

Cast your vote in the poll on the right and then leave a comment below explaining your answer. Have you tried all three apps? Which SSB do you prefer? Why do you think it’s better than the competition? We want to know!

Quick Look posts are paid submissions offering only a brief overview of an app. Vote in the polls below if you think this app is worth an in-depth AppStorm review!

In this Quick Look, we’re highlighting Bazinga 4 Mac. The developer describes Bazinga 4 Mac as an app which can turn any web site, web page or web app into a native mac application. This allows you to access your favorite web sites quickly and easily without relying on your web browser.

Read on for more information and screenshots!

Update: We messed up with the price on this one! We’d like to make it clear that Bazinga is completely free, not $49.99 as originally stated. Sorry for the confusion!

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Many of us have more than one web browser on our Mac – I have copies of Safari, Firefox, Opera, Camino, Google Chrome and various others. Although I certainly don’t use them all regularly (Safari is my browser of choice), I do open them all occasionally to try out new features and test the appearance of a website.

If you regularly use different browsers, manually opening them and copy-and-pasting links into specific ones can become frustrating. You can only have one “default browser” on OS X, and there’s no easy way to quickly specify which particular one to use at any given time.

Today’s How-To will be introducing an application called Choosy, which helps to make running multiple browsers far more enjoyable.

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If you’re someone who dips in and out of several web apps on a daily basis, you may be interested to know that an application for OSX can make your life easier. Fluid allows you to create ‘Site Specific Browsers’ (SSBs) – a separate desktop app for each website you use on a regular basis.

In essence, this allows you to have an standalone dock icon for a variety of websites, opening a specific browser for each website when clicked. I use this functionality for accessing Basecamp on a regular basis – it’s far quicker than navigating to the site through a browser bookmark, and keeps whatever you have going on in Safari completely separate.

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