Posts Tagged

Internet

After being featured on TechCrunch as well as being tweeted by our fellow sister site MacTuts, it seems that Inky has enjoyed an unexpected surge of interest this week, despite having been around since May of this year. The interest was generated after a random post on Hacker News generated a fair bit of chatter among users and gave the app a fair bit of attention – something that the Maryland-based developers certainly weren’t expecting as they’ve never really actively sought out press coverage before.

Inky promises to reinvent email – and this time it’s for good (none of those wishy-washy promises like from other companies) – and any company or software product that promises that instantly grabs my attention. So I thought it worth to take a quick look at Inky (it’s currently in the public beta stage at the moment) to see what all the fuss is about.

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In 2002, a book entitled Getting Things Done was published by author David Allen, to widespread critical acclaim and quickly began to amass an almost cult following. In it, the author set forth a method for improving the efficiency of work processes by employing time management techniques, task prioritisation, and concentration on the most important tasks. Ten years, and many improved work-flows later, Allen’s theory remains as prevalent as ever, but not necessarily in the state he first imagined.

Despite being the title of Allen’s book, Getting Things Done, or GTD, has since become the byword for any method of improving productivity, regardless of relevance to the author’s original. Allen’s paper-based method has become outdated in the ten years since its publication, and, largely in response to technological advance and the Internet, other more relevant GTD theories have emerged, such as David Sparks’ Paperless.

With the myriad of electronic devices that now dominate many work flows and work places, making distractions easier to come by—ahem, Twitter—new ways of boosting productivity have come about. However, not everybody has time to read, implement, and stick to a special system. So, how do we bridge this impasse? It’s simple: take away the Internet, or at least part of it. Intrigued? Find out more after the break.

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During Apple’s recent announcement of the “New iPad,” Tim Cook dropped the term “post-PC” so much that it became distracting. One thing is for sure, Apple wants to drill this concept into your brain. They know where the future of the industry is and they’re making dang sure you’re on board with their self-fulfilling prophecy.

According to some recent statistics from mobiThinking, Cook is right. They estimate that 25% of U.S. mobile web users are mobile-only, meaning their primary way of accessing the web fits nicely into their pocket.

Today we want to put some of these concepts to the test by asking which device you primarily use to access the web. Do you mostly browse on a desktop, laptop, tablet or phone? After you vote in the poll, leave a comment below telling us what you use and why.

You can ask just about anybody what browser they’re using, and they will very likely respond with Safari, Firefox or Chrome. I have never met anyone who actually uses Opera for everyday browsing. This is not surprising seeing as how its usage share is 2.4%. And yet, nearly everybody has heard of it. So why do so few people use it?

Today, I’ll be taking a look at Opera, what it has to offer, and whether or not you should consider adopting it as your new favourite browser.

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Many people have bandwidth limits with their ISPs, and with the amount of tempting content on the web these days, it can be hard to stick within these limits. Software such as SurplusMeter is great for tracking your bandwidth usage, but there’s no way of seeing what is using up your bandwidth.

Enter Rubbernet, a new app from Conceited Software which tracks what apps are accessing your network connection, and how much bandwidth they are using. If some third-party software is accessing your network without your permission, you can find out and try to stop it.

Not only is this useful for monitoring bandwidth usage, but it can be used to detect any software which might be secretly sending out personal data of yours. A great concept for an app, but does it work in practice? Let’s take a look.

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Everybody knows about Safari, and most people agree that it’s good. It’s fast, it’s stable, it’s sexy —  and everybody knows about other popular web browsers like Firefox and Chrome. But there are several other lesser known web browsers that offer cool features that Safari lacks.

Although you don’t need to use them all the time, unless you want to, they’re nice to have around to utilize every once in a while. Whether you’re wanting social integration or parallel sessions, it’s a good idea to have them there.

Let’s take a look at a selection of Safari alternatives!

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Our sponsor this week is Radium, a lightweight internet radio player with a wonderfully retro icon! Radium allows you to listen to thousands of radio stations from around the world, right from your OS X menu bar. It’s simple, functional, and an absolutely fantastic way to listen to the radio on your Mac.

In our recent review, we gave Radium a lofty 9/10 rating. For such a simple and understated application, it packs a real functionality punch.

You can listen to all manner of subscription radio services, share songs with your social network friends and followers, adjust equalizer settings, view a song history, and use an array of useful keyboard shortcuts.

If you like Radium as much as we do, you’ll be pleased to discover that AppStorm readers can get 25% off the price of the app this week. Just order your copy from this page, and the discount will be automatically applied.

Be sure to spend a few minutes giving Radium a try today – you’ll be glad you did!

Just under a year ago, we published a review of Snowtape, an internet radio player for OS X. I was incredibly impressed with the polish of the interface, functionality, and the range of features available.

Today we’re pleased to give you a sneak preview of what to expect in Snowtape 2.0 – the second major release of this app. Complete with a brand new icon and a major batch of new features, it’s a release not to be missed if you’re a fan of internet radio. Read on for more information!

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Radium’s grown up a lot since we first reviewed it, so be sure to check out our review of Radium 3, the latest version, as well!

I’m a bit of a BBC Radio 4 and World Service addict. We have a couple of digital radios in the house, and with the UK’s Freeview television network, it’s easy to listen to a number of digital stations via your TV. When I’m on the road away from any of my radios, and have access to a wireless network, I’ve used Phantom Gorilla’s unofficial BBC Radio Widget to get my fix.

That all looks likely to change, now that Radium has arrived. Read on for a walk-through of a simple and effective radio app that makes it very easy to tune in to your favourite stations – and discover hundreds of new ones – on your Mac.

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With the days of the static desktop almost in the past, moving around with your computer has become easier than ever. However, getting everything set up right at home, work, Starbucks or an airport can be time consuming and repetitive. Enter NetworkLocation, an application with the goal of automating this process.

NetworkLocation aims to to adjust your settings when you might forget to – like muting the volume when in a coffee shop, or changing the timezone when you head out across the country. Through the use of Apple’s Core Location technology, first seen in the iPhone and recently implemented in Snow Leopard on the Mac, the application is able to detect your location via nearby Wi-Fi networks, internet connections and connected devices. Hopefully this $29 application can save you enough time every day to make the price worth it.

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