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internet radio

Bored of your iTunes music? Want more music without paying for a subscription to any of the new online music services? Then you need to get a copy of Radium 3, our sponsor this week.

Radium is the Mac app for serious internet radio listeners. It’s beautifully designed, simple to use, and filled with over 8,000 stations of every genre so you’ll always have something to listen to. Just search for the type of music you feel like listening to, and get back to what you’re doing. Radium will stream the music, let you easily see what’s playing in your menubar, and keep a list of your favorites so you can buy them from iTunes later. It’s great.

Radium 3

If you take your internet radio seriously, then you’ll want the best audio quality possibly. Radium makes that easy, with a built-in equalizer, and support for AirPlay to send music to your wireless speakers or Apple TV. It’ll let you share the songs you like with your social networks, find the currently playing song on iTunes, and even lets you subscribe to premium radio stations if you want. It’s everything you could want from an internet radio player app, and it works great.

Rediscover Internet Radio with Radium Today!

There’s no better way to enjoy internet radio on your Mac than with Radium, so why not give it a try today? You can download a free trial of Radium 3 from their site, or get your own copy of Radium 3 from the App Store for just $9.99. Then sit back, and enjoy the music.

We’re pretty sure you’ll decide it’s chocolate for your ears, too.

Think you’ve got a great app? Sign up for a Weekly Sponsorship slot just like this one.

Two years ago, we had the chance to talk with the CatPig Studios team about Radium. They led us behind the scenes at the inspiration behind their popular menubar radio app for the Mac, and why they develop for the Mac in particular.

The world's changed a lot in the meantime, with seemingly countless music streaming services competing to be the only way you listen to music. And yet, the Radium team has pushed on, releasing a brand-new version of Radium this year that's nicer than ever.

We got the chance to interview Kirill Zorin from CatPig Studios again this week, so here's the latest info about their work, and how they're competing in 2013's online music landscape.

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When it comes to Internet radio, Pandora is the king. It’s been around since January 2000, nearly 13 years, and is going strong. Even though its stock definitely hasn’t gone anywhere good since the company went public last year, it has remained the most popular Internet radio service. On-demand streaming services like Spotify have tried to compete but Pandora holds its place well.

One of the problems with this great service is its availability. It’s always been a browser-only thing and the developers don’t care to expand it to have its own native app on anything except a mobile phone. There is an official lightweight Mac app, but it requires that you have Pandora One, a monthly or yearly subscription. It’s also not a very nice app, being coded with Adobe Air and Flash. Instead, Maha Software’s PandaBar, a native Mac app that sits in your menu bar, seems like a great alternative. Let’s take a closer look.

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Despite the rise in popularity of TV on demand, Internet and Twitter, I still like listening to the radio. It offers such a wide variety of songs and different kinds of programs that, for example TV, doesn’t offer. Call me a dinosaur if you will, but I would much rather listen to the radio for a couple of hours than wind it away in front of some lifeless, cheap TV program.

Believe it or not, I don’t actually own a radio – I tune in via the Internet. I am currently based in Germany, and from time to time, I need a good, solid dose of British culture to remind me of my roots. I can get all my British radio stations (such as BBC Radio 1) via the Internet, without having to pay any kind of license fees (unlike television).

When you look at the figures, the popularity of Internet radio is on the rise. In 2007, 11% of the U.S. population listened to the radio via the Internet; in 2008 this figure had crept up to 13% (and is presumably still on the rise). It’s certainly cheaper than buying an actual radio, and you can listen to stations from different parts of the country.

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