Posts Tagged

learning

Japanese is notorious for being one of the hardest foreign languages to learn as an English speaker (alongside Arabic, Chinese and Korean). Not only it is radically different to English, with very little similarities to our own mother tongue, but the entirely different writing system can make it a real nightmare to learn. Yet the question, “how do I learn a foreign language?”, has, unfortunately, a multitude of different answers and there isn’t one simple way of learning a tongue from far-away lands. You could, of course, by just a textbook and learn it yourself, but in this day and age, with our modern technology, there must surely be a more effective and exciting way of learning some conversational Spanish before your trip to the Costa del Sol or, in this case, some Japanese before that big business trip to Japan.

Human Japanese, which has been featured on the front of the App Store, believes that it can help you learn Japanese in a new and intuitive way. At a mere $9.99, it’s certainly less expensive than the options out there (such as Rosetta Stone, which starts at $179 a level) but does a bargain price equate to quality?

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At school the only subjects to truly capture my attention were the sciences. I was always utterly enamoured with space, the not so final-final frontier. Today, many years later, I realise that space is far from a singular topic, but, rather, a subject in a constant state of flux further sub-divided into many schools of thought far beyond my level of comprehension. Such a vast topic can be understandably daunting—especially for young students—but everybody has to start somewhere; somewhere like the solar system.

Solar Walk utilises a fully-explorable 3D model of the solar system to make the subject interactive and informative helping to encourage seedling scientific minds. By introducing new found lovers of space to the fundamental make-up of our celestial home it can help build a solid platform of knowledge that can be used to undertake a deeper, more complex interest in the cosmos. Join me after the break to find out how Solar Walk stacks up!

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Imagine being a kid in this generation. Some kids today are able to enjoy technology like we never had back when we were kids. From iPods and iPads, to iMacs, MacBooks, and gaming consoles, kids nowadays have so much technology around them that it is extremely hard to imagine how it would have been like for us.

The good thing is, electronics aren’t only for entertainment either, but they can be used as learning tools that develop your children’s motor skills, comprehension, creativeness, and so much more. With that in mind, we’ve gathered up some of the coolest children games in the Mac App Store. Some of them are just games, while others are meant to be learning games. So, quit Coda or iWork for a bit, and let your children enjoy some of these games.

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With the recent release of iBooks Author from Apple, I started to think more about using Apple products as learning tools. The iBooks Author announcement and accompanying video certainly generate some excitement at the possibilities using the iPad in classrooms and that is great, but I became curious as to what type of applications were currently available in the Mac App Store.

I began exploring and trolling for educational applications. We’ve done roundups on educational tools, such as note taking aids and other utilities of that nature, so I wanted to focus more on applications that directly help you to learn something. This wasn’t an easy task as they proved to be quite difficult to find. Here’s a list of fifty to get you started.

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No matter if you are attending school, college or self-teaching yourself, your Mac can be a valuable tool to help you accomplish your goals. We’ve rounded up 9 fantastic apps which will help you to teach and organize yourself better than ever, hopefully getting you on the road to improving your knowledge.

Whether you’re wanting to learn a language, improve your math, or structure an academic course, there’ll be something for you in today’s roundup.!

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Language learning has traditionally been quite a mundane task involving dense, boring textbooks and pointless grammar and vocabulary exercises. People only really learnt a language simply because they either had to at school, or because it was required by their employer.

However, last week I went into my local bookstore and I thought to myself that the demand for language learning must be there. There was a whole corner of the bookstore devoted to language learning, from Afrikaans to Zulu and the more popular languages such as French, German and Spanish often had whole bookcases to themselves – there must have been at least 5 different kinds of courses for each language.

People must obviously want to learn languages; otherwise bookshops wouldn’t be filling up their shelves with courses. But is learning a language out of a book now history? Can a computer really help us with some conversational Spanish before that trip to Madrid? Or maybe that big meeting with those investors from Germany?

Well, Rosetta Stone believes it can. It uses a technique called dynamic immersion, which is an intuitive new way of learning a foreign language and one that is radically different from all other programs.

It has certainly got a loyal fan base: NASA and the European Union both use it to teach foreign languages and the company offers a six-month risk-free guarantee on all their products, meaning you can return them within six months of purchase without any problems if you’re not completely satisfied with the results.

Rosetta Stone teaches a foreign language in the way babies start to learn talking: by listening to their parents and repeating every word they say and by relating words to pictures, much like during infant development. This method may seem a bit dumbed down for us adults, but I gave the Russian version of Rosetta Stone (a language which I had prior to this write-up absolutely no idea about) a go to see what the results were like. Read on for my full review.

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Today we’ll be looking at twenty applications that will enhance your classroom experience. The apps range in focus from elementary up through higher education and span multiple disciplines.

Each app has been separated into one of six categories: Lesson Planning, Grading, Testing Tools, Teachers as Students, Teaching Tools, and For the Classroom. Let’s get started!

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Quick Look posts are paid submissions offering only a brief overview of an app. Vote in the polls below if you think this app is worth an in-depth AppStorm review!

In this Quick Look, we’re highlighting Mental Case. The developer describes Mental Case as the ultimate study tool for Mac OS X and iPhone, combining traditional flashcards with the latest learning techniques. Use it to study for an exam or learn a new language. Anything you want to learn, Mental Case can teach you.

Read on for more information and screenshots!

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To be completely truthful, anyone can use some extra help when it comes to learning a new subject. The study process can often involve late nights, sitting in front of a ridiculously heavy textbook, and a tall can of your favorite energy drink.

Cram is a simple and easy-to-use study and testing tool that can be your go-to study buddy when you room mate is out partying. By simply entering a set of questions and answers into the application once, Cram will help you review for the upcoming exam with flash-cards. Afterwards, take a practice test, apply the knowledge, and see how much you have remembered.

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