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Office

OneNote has been one of the most popular note taking tools for Windows for some time now but more recently, Microsoft brought OneNote to Mac.

OneNote for Mac is a powerful productivity tool allows you to capture thoughts, discoveries, and ideas in a digital notebook. OneNote is ideal for those that want to improve their productivity, brainstorm ideas, plan a big event or just have a more structured way of collecting masses of clippings you want to save online. OneNote for Mac is fully integrated with all other versions of the software for PC and mobile so not matter what device you use to save clippings, OneNote brings it all together.

For business purposes, OneNote isn’t nearly as powerful as other collaborative project management tools like Wrike, eXo Platform, or even Zoho Docs, but its ease of use makes it a worthwhile addition to your arsenal of Mac productivity tools.

Accepts notes in any shape or form

OneNote is basically an open canvas that allows you to type anywhere and rearrange content on the page in any way. You can format your notes with different fonts or colors, and organize your content with tables. You can add pictures, PowerPoint documents, PDFs, links, articles, diagrams, annotations – just about any kind of content fits into OneNote.

Taking snapshots of articles and web pages on the internet is made even easier in OneNote thanks to a clippings extension or add-on which allows you to save pages instantly to OneNote. It can even extract text from photos and pictures and copy them into your notes although the accuracy depends on the quality of the image.

OneNote can even copy text from pictures into your notebooks.

OneNote can even copy text from pictures into your notebooks.

In place of spreadsheets, OneNote uses simple OneNote tables to make sense of information. Start on a new line of text by typing a word, phrase, or number, and then press the Tab key to create the next column and press Return to create a new row. Alternately, you can click Insert > Table on the ribbon or on the menu bar.

Tag, you’re it!

You can edit your clippings in many different ways. You can create, rename, search, sort, color code, and copy pages, sections and notebooks to organize your content as you’d like. Or you can tag notes to highlight them, compile and track to-do lists, flag questions and more.

The Tags gallery on the Home tab lets you visually prioritize or categorize selected notes. Tagged notes are marked with icons that prompt you to follow up on your important action items, or to check off completed tasks on your to-do lists.

OneNote offers several different tags to helps organize your notes.

OneNote offers several different tag icons to helps organize your notes.

Customization and color coordination is a big part of OneNote. For example, when you first launch OneNote, a default notebook with the Quick Notes section is created for you, but you can easily create additional colorful notebooks for the subjects and projects you want by clicking plus sign (+) in the Notebooks list or by clicking File > New Notebook on the menu bar.

OneNote for Mac gives you a choice of notebook styles when you open a new notebook.

OneNote for Mac gives you a choice of notebook styles when you open a new notebook.

Adding new pages or notes to notebooks is also very easy. To create a new page in the current section of your notebook simply click (+) Add Page over the page tabs, or click File > New Page on the menu bar. To create a new section in the current notebook, click the plus sign (+) next to the section tabs, or click File > New Section on the menu bar.

OneNote automatically saves all of your changes as you work. If you want to see when OneNote last synced your changes, click the name of your current notebook, and then click the arrow next to it in the Notebooks list and it will show the time of the last sync.

When it comes to collaboration, OneNote allows you to edit the same workbook at the same time as another colleague or friend whether they are on PC, mobile or Mac. Notes are automatically synced to OneDrive, OneDrive for Business or Microsoft SharePoint, making it easy to switch between devices. Note, however, that Apple’s iCloud is not supported.

Conclusion

OneNote is a very well organized and clinically executed tool which is one of the main reasons why it has been popular for so long. However, you will find yourself doing a lot of clicking as there are very few keyboard shortcuts and when you’re cutting and pasting a lot, this would certainly help.

It’s also a bit frustrating when you can only open one notebook at a time especially if you need information from another notebook to add to the current one you’re working on.

OneNote is great for jotting down ideas or managing your personal projects, but if you’re using it for business within a team, check out a cloud-based collaboration application or project management solution, as these are much more robust and generally work seamlessly across Mac and all your other devices.

Evernote’s a great notebook app. It makes it simple to write notes down, record audio or drag in images to remember everything, and then find it all again quickly with a click.

But then, what makes Evernote so nice — something so many people rely on — is far more than just being a notes app. There’s plenty of places you can jot down notes, from the built-in Notes app to services like Simplenote. Evernote, though, ends up being far more than just that since there’s so many ways to add info to it. You can clip web pages with the brilliant new Evernote Web Clipper, snap pictures and add notes on the go with the new iPhone app, or use IFTTT to save stuff to Evernote on the go. If only you could do something with all that info.

Well, now you can. That’s where Evernote’s new Presentation Mode comes in.

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We were all expecting iWork news on Tuesday. Apple’s Roger Rosner had taken a considerable amount of time at this year’s WWDC to showcase their new iWork web apps and then briefly mentioned that new versions of the native iWork apps would be coming this fall.

What we got instead, though, was the surprising claim that iWork is the best selling suite of mobile productivity applications (which, I suppose, isn’t actually that surprising since “mobile” wouldn’t include Microsoft Office on laptops) followed by the announcement that iWork and iLife apps would all be free with new iOS devices going forward. Combine that with the free online iWork apps in iCloud, and Microsoft Office has the stiffest competition it’s faced in well over a decade.

Google can boast businesses that have gone Google, but Apple has its best shot ever at convincing the rest of us that its beautiful documents, spreadsheets, and presentations apps are more than enough to leave Office Home & Student behind.

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If you’re like me and are completely in love with your Doxie scanner, then you’ll no doubt be scanning almost anything you can get your hands on, whether it needs scanning or not! It’s a great first step towards de-cluttering your desk and making everything as easy to find as possible. And even if you don’t have a Doxie, there’s a ton of other great scanners out there that can quickly turn all of your paper into digital documents.

But once you’ve scanned all your paperwork, what do you actually do with it? That’s where iDocument comes in. Could it be the app your paperless workflow needs?

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While Macs are more popular than they’ve ever been, Windows computers still form the majority of the market. Many of us, in fact, spend time using both, perhaps a Mac at home while on a PC at work. Working with others means even full time Mac users often needs to exchange files and data with users running Windows.

Fortunately the increased popularity of Macs makes this split environment easier than ever. Many common applications are cross platform and available for both Mac and Windows computers, and open standards and web apps make up for the rest. Let’s look at some apps that make it easier on everyone when working on both Macs and PCs. (more…)

With WWDC coming up tomorrow, I’m sure I can speak for every reader here that we’ll all excited to hear what Apple is going to announce! Kevin over at iPhone AppStorm will be live blogging the main announcement on their Twitter account and we here at Mac AppStorm will bring you full news coverage and some more in-depth analysis afterwards.

In other Apple news this week…

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This week has been pretty full up with all sorts going on in the Apple world, in particular the official announcement of WWDC 2012 (where we are probably going to see the proper launch of OS X Mountain Lion, a new and updated iMac range and maybe even a sneak preview of iOS 6) and the fact the tickets sold in a mere 2 hours!

In other Apple-related news this week…

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As always, here’s Mac AppStorm’s weekly roundup of news and this week, it isn’t related to Facebook’s purchase of Instagram. Enjoy!
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Nothing gets the week started off right like a good old fashioned Microsoft vs. Apple debate. Once upon a time these were a staple in the Mac user’s daily life but these days we focus much more on Google and Android as a major threat than crazy Ballmer and the gang in Redmond.

For a moment, let’s look back at Microsoft and ask a question that’s essential for every new Mac user: Office or iWork? If someone is faced with the choice of purchasing only one of these suites, which should it be and why?

Only a few years ago iWork was a new competitor in this game but it’s had more than enough time to rise to the challenge of taking on the formerly undisputed champion of documents. The question is, has it? On the other side, while iWork has been increasing in popularity, Microsoft has been hard at work making Office seem more at home on the Mac. Office now closely resembles Apple’s software in both functionality and appearance.

So which is better? You decide! Cast your vote in the poll and then leave a comment below defending your opinion.

If you spend a significant duration of time on your Mac for work or play, there’s a reasonable chance that you’ve experienced some degree of discomfort directly caused by that activity. If not, the chances are that you will eventually. The human race did not evolve for countless generations towards enabling mankind to sit at a desk for hours at a time and the effects of this lifestyle on our bodies can range from annoying discomfort to severe pain, or even an early death, as recently highlighted by the somewhat alarming infographic Sitting Is Killing You.

Below we’ll take a more detailed look at RSI and touch upon the larger health issues which also come with living an office-based lifestyle to see what can be done to prevent, alleviate or even cure these problems.

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