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In Lion, the Spaces feature has been replaced by Mission Control, one central location with some major window management capabilities (Exposé shortcuts are still available).

We recently published an article on Making the Most of Mission Control and would love to know how you’re getting along with the new system.

I think the best way to judge your acceptance of Mission Control is by noting how much you actually use it on a day to day basis. Is it a novelty feature that you forget exists (Dashboard anyone?) or is it something that you use constantly and couldn’t live without?

Cast your vote in the poll and then leave a comment below about why you love or hate it and if you miss any functionality from Snow Leopard.

Now that Lion has been out for a while, many of us have downloaded it on our primary computers and are now using the operating system full-time. As far as stability goes, the reports that we’re receiving are a bit scattered.

For my part, Lion roars along nicely. I upgraded the day it launched and apart from an initial slowdown while Spotlight finished indexing, I can’t say that I’ve run into a single major issue that couldn’t be addressed in a few minutes or less (even on my ancient 2007 MacBook).

However, I’ve heard several people, including some of our own writers, describe OS X Lion as an “extremely buggy” and all around unstable release. Given the variety of different Mac setups that exist, there are bound to be some pretty disparate experiences from users. Today we want to know what you think. Is Lion solid as a rock or one big, buggy mess?

Cast your vote in the poll and then leave a comment below telling us about some of the persistent problems you’ve run into and what machine you’re running.

Choosing between a default Mac utility and a more powerful third party client is always difficult. Tighter system integration and the “free” aspect are on your side with the built-in tool, but there’s often a shortage of the kind of powerful features that a freestanding application offers.

Font management is a perfect example of this. Font Book is a decent way to manage your fonts, but creative professionals and anyone else who deals with fonts daily might find it fairly lacking.

Today we want to know how you manage your font library. Do you use third party software or have you stuck with the tools that Apple has provided? Cast your vote above, then leave a comment letting us know which font management apps you’ve tried and which you like the best.

The Mac App Store has been out for quite a while now and we like to check in from time to time to see what you guys think of it. The most honest way that we give a product an up or down vote is with our wallets so today we want to know how many paid downloads you’ve made from the Mac App Store to date (free app downloads don’t count).

Choose one of the options on the right and then leave a comment below telling us which apps you’ve purchased and what you think of them. Also feel free to chime in on the overall pricing scheme of the App Store. Do you think apps are fairly priced for the most part? Too high? Too low? Your opinion matters and we want to hear it!

Today’s poll is a fun walk down memory lane. I’m very interested to know how young or old our audience is in their Mac-using lives. Leave your answer in the poll on the right and let us know which was the first Mac operating system you really used extensively or owned yourself. Did you start when it was simply referred to as “System” software or are you a newbie who only just got your start on Snow Leopard?

After you vote, leave a comment below and tell us about your first Mac. I’ll start us off. Though I really began using Macs around OS 8, the first Mac I really owned was a Blueberry iMac running OS 9. I loved all the neat little sound effects the windows made and spent endless hours poking around the system to see what I could find.

The last Windows machine I owned ran Windows 3.1 and that’s honestly the last time I really used Windows on a daily basis! Once I switched to a Mac I never looked back. How about you? Do you own and use both operating systems regularly or are you a die-hard Mac-loving PC hater from way back?

We recently published an article titled “iCloud: What It Isn’t” that walked through what we all expected to see from iCloud and how that significantly differed from what we actually got.

Basically, the gist is that everyone expected a browser-based music player but Apple delivered a way to keep your music and data synced in a native environment. To some, the reality is actually way more useful than the expectation. Others may be disappointed that their music isn’t really being stored in the cloud for access from any device. I myself have a Google Music Beta account but can’t for the life of me think of when I’ll use it.

Today we want to know your opinion. With plenty of us toting around a MacBook, iPhone, iPod and/or iPad, is there really a reason to have a Google-Music-like cloud player for all your music? Are there significant amounts of time where you don’t have access to your music collection? Vote in the poll on the right and leave a comment below explaining your thoughts.

This week we’re focusing in on the Mac App Store quite heavily. Personally, I really love how easy it has become to find, download and update great new Mac Apps. However, I’m far from admitting that the system is perfect!

Later today we’ll have a roundup of awesome apps that you won’t find on the Mac App Store. Later this week we’ll take a deeper look into the general direction that Apple is guiding the software industry and whether or not its a good thing for users. For now, we want to know about your biggest beef with the Mac App Store. Are you frustrated with the pricing structure or unhappy with the current selection? Let us know in the poll!

After you vote, leave a comment below explaining your answers. Has your overall experience with the Mac App Store positive or negative? How often do you check in and see what new apps have arrived?

Well, the end of 2010 is almost upon us! It’s been a fantastic year of technology releases, and announcements – not just in our Apple bubble, but across the whole industry.

For me personally, my iPad has changed the way I read, the iPhone 4 completely revolutionised my appreciation of screen technology, and I finally got around to purchasing an SSD (the verdict is in – they’re astounding).

A few weeks ago, I published a few thoughts on what I considered to be the Best Mac Software of 2010, but there’s a whole lot to look forward to over the coming year.

Whether you’re stoked about OS X Lion, excited to try out the Mac App Store, or on the edge of your seat about the iPad 2, 2011 is going to be an action packed year for Apple users everywhere.

But what’s the one thing that you really can’t wait for? Let us know in our weekly poll, and we’ll be extra sure to bring you plenty of news and coverage around that particular event next year!

For many people, Christmas Day is a great opportunity to switch off completely. I always try to avoid using gadgets and technology, preferring to spend quality time with the people that I really care about. It sounds cliché, sure, but days like these are incredibly important from time to time.

We’re all permanently connected to the Internet, and our access to emails, social media, and the ongoing barrage of communication is no longer limited to “the office”. If you’re anything like me, it sometimes feels that your iPhone is physically attached to your body, following you around everywhere you go.

Sometimes, this is brilliant. Being in constant communication and always “plugged in”, gives us a connection to the world that people would never have dreamt of a few decades ago.

But it’s no way to live your life every day of the year.

Whether or not you celebrate Christmas, why not consider the 25th December a day to leave your MacBook lid firmly shut, turn off your iPhone, and just enjoy the day with family and friends? You never know – it might just be something you want to make a regular thing!

Although OS X is (at least in my humble opinion!) the best operating system on the market, most people have a need to boot into Windows, Linux, or another OS from time to time. Apple made this easier with the release of Boot Camp a few years ago, and dual booting your Mac is now a pretty simple process.

There are, of course, several other ways to run multiple operating systems within OS X itself (we’ve written about the process a few times), using applications such as Parallels Desktop.

Various advantages exist for each method. Using Boot Camp gives better performance in your alternative OS, making it a great option if you want to run processor-intensive applications such as the latest games. Running both operating systems side-by-side is more practical for simpler tasks, such as testing a website in multiple browsers.

So my question for you today is, do you dual boot?

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