Posts Tagged

preferences

If you work regularly with an editing program of any sort – be it Final Cut Pro, Adobe Premiere, Avid, or other advanced programs – chances are good that you understand how truly important your personal preference files are. From keyboard shortcuts to import/export presets to installed plugins, preference files can incorporate a lot in a good editing program. In fact, without the proper preference files in place, an experienced editor’s productivity can completely disappear.

This brings me to the focus of the article – why it is important to always backup your preference files. If you are a serious editor, you probably already know why you should backup the files, and you might even be doing it already. If you don’t yet understand why you should backup the files or simply want to learn an easy way to backup the files with a convenient, free program called Preference Manager, then read on after the jump.

(more…)

rooSwitch is now the new SwitchUp from Irradated Software. It’s mostly the same as in our review here, but now with menu options. Our article still refers to it as rooSwitch, but if you want to try it out, SwitchUp is essentially the same app, just updated and with a new name.

Do you ever wish you could set up an app’s preferences, then create another profile with a completely different set of preferences?

rooSwitch is a unique app that does exactly that. Read on to see how you can put this incredibly useful app to work.

(more…)

Out of the box, your Mac will work absolutely perfectly—better than most other operating systems, in fact. It will also look wonderful, with teams of designers working hard to make sure your Mac experience looks just right.

And yet, there is even more to be got from OS X – whether it’s tweaking the design, or adjusting countless preferences, the Mac power user will always try to squeeze every last bit out of his computer. Developers know this, and there are a number of apps that make this an easy experience.

Refinery is one of these apps, developed by EZASoft. It focuses primarily on tweaking the appearance of your Mac, whether it’s the dock, Sidebar icons, your Login Window or your Dashboard, it tries to make everything look and work the way you want. Read on to see how it fares.

(more…)

If you’re an AppStorm reader, then there’s a good chance you are a Mac user. I’m going to go out on a limb here and say you’re pretty happy with the experience. You’re probably wandering about this site, checking out a few cool Mac applications and maybe looking to learn a thing or two about your fancy machine.

The Terminal is the command line for your Mac and can be used, among other things, to really fine tune the Mac OS experience. Many are aware of this capability, but are a little scared to deal with the Terminal.

But what if there was a way to make all of those little system tweaks and changes while steering completely clear of Terminal? Well, read on to find out more about MacPilot!

(more…)

“Tinker, v.: attempt to repair or improve something in a casual or desultory way, often to no useful effect.”

If I could get back just some of the time that I have spent tinkering with computers over the years, I think I might be able to extend my lifetime quite significantly. One of the great things about OS X is that it actually requires little tinkering (and yes, some systems do require quite a lot of it!).

If you simply hand over control to the operating system, things will generally run quite smoothly. This does, though, also mean giving up on some choice, and so some freedom.

There are many apps available that help you to change various aspects of your Mac’s appearance and the way it generally runs. One of the best, and widest known, is Marcel Bresink’s TinkerTool. Join us after the jump as we explore what this app can do for you.

(more…)

Apple made a controversial change in Snow Leopard. It’s a fairly system-level one, though, so perhaps the majority of users will not have had any issues with it – but it’s made some experienced Mac users pretty unhappy. What’s changed is the way in which files open when double-clicked.

It used to be that OS X embedded what’s known as a Creator Code in new files, so that the system knew to open files within the applications that made them. Rob Griffiths published a discussion of this behaviour, and the changes in Snow Leopard, in Macworld back in September last year. Have a read of that piece, and the lengthy comments that accompany it, if you want to understand the issue better.

I haven’t been impacted by this change to a great degree, but one of the applications that comes up in discussion of ways of fixing the change, and giving back more control over what applications open files, caught my eye. Michel Fortin’s Magic Launch is a Preference Pane that lets you manipulate file-opening in ways that allow you a great deal of flexibility.

It solves the problem of Creator Codes being removed, but it also adds some excellent functionality, and that means it’s well worth a look even if you’re untroubled by the main issue it addresses.

(more…)

Apple’s System Preferences are fairly extensive, and certainly allow you to quickly alter the most common settings related to your Mac. Though this is perfect for most users, occasionally it becomes necessary to dig a little deeper into your system configuration.

This is where Cocktail comes in. It’s a standalone application that provides all manner of advanced options for you to configure – everything from how the interface of various apps behaves, to adjusting Spotlight, Time Machine, and emptying caches.

We’ll be taking a look at just how powerful this little utility is!

(more…)

theatre-aglow
theatre-aglow
theatre-aglow
theatre-aglow