Posts Tagged

puzzle

I never knew that sorting and counting change could be so engaging. That is, at least, before I tried ChangeReaction and got hooked on its unique twist on the match-three formula. It’s an audio game — a video game without graphics — designed with blind people in mind, although sighted folks can certainly enjoy themselves too.

Unlike a regular video game, where you act on both visual and auditory stimuli, ChangeReaction is entirely predicated on what you can hear. You piece together the scene and gauge your progress, and do pretty much everything, solely by listening to sound effects and voice samples and pressing keys on your keyboard.
(more…)

Puzzle games are a dime a dozen, and to set itself apart, a puzzler is going to have to be pretty special. More than just exchanging pigs for birds or coins for jewels, a great puzzle is more than a gimmick. It challenges how you think.

A great puzzle game will also challenge how you see games, and that’s what the developers at Cipher Prime are working on. Their newest offering, Splice, isn’t just a great puzzle, but it may also change your definition of what a game can mean. Don’t get me wrong, all of the great puzzling fun is there, but it’s more than a place to sink a few minutes. Splice will create an experience that frustrates you but also surprises you with its beauty and genius. (more…)

Snapshot tells the story of a clumsy robot who finds himself lost and alone, left nothing but an abandoned world full of dangers and his trusty camera. His camera provides him the ability to photograph objects, removing them from the world completely and pasting them back into the world via that very same camera.

This ability in turn affords you the opportunity to solve Snapshot’s collection of increasingly difficult puzzles. Along the way you’ll encounter and interact with a number of objects both helpful and harmful, everything from dangerous spikes to bouncy elephants. If these adventures sound like a challenge you’re ready to take on, stick with me to learn more about Snapshot.

(more…)

“Do I need the light on or is darkness the key to my salvation?” After my latest Humble Bundle download, I spent many long, late nights pondering that question as I slowly but surely worked my way through my latest favorite, Closure. It’s is an independent puzzler that found its start as a Newgrounds flash game. Closure has since been released for Mac and is available via a Steam purchase.

In Closure the name of the game is the manipulation of light, balancing lightness and darkness to suit your needs. Will the spots of darkness allow you to pass through a seemingly solid wall or will they cause you to tumble into the abyss, falling to your inevitable death? If these questions pique your interest, stick with me to learn more about how Closure works.

(more…)

Games don’t often show players the future implications of their decisions or the systems behind their interactions, but for Eden Industries’ Waveform this is a core feature. It tasks you with guiding a wave of light safely through levels, layering ever greater complexity on a simple idea.

Colorful visuals, great music, and slick presentation combine to make Waveform a compelling, atmospheric experience well worth your attention, although the game falters and frustrates at times. (more…)

Puzzle games are everywhere, and it can be hard to find something new that you love and can connect with. Fortunately Fractal: Make Blooms Not War burst onto the scene and gave us an engaging puzzler with a new spin on matching and board-clearing games. An attractive interface and inventive gameplay make this one not to be missed.

What sets Fractal apart from other matching games like Bejeweled, though? We’ll answer that, look at what makes Fractal such a special game, and go over a few tips for getting started. (more…)

This post is part of a series that revisits some of our readers’ favorite articles from the past that still contain awesome and relevant information that you might find useful. This post was originally published on June 15th, 2011.

Puzzle style adventure games have never exactly been my “thing”. I’m not a hardcore gamer, but when I do play, I usually stay away from these types of games. After deciding to expand my horizons, I looked around in this genre and spotted Machinarium. The screenshots of the game immediately drew my attention. The visuals were absolutely stunning and enough to get me to venture off into the realm of puzzle/adventure gaming.

Machinarium is a point and click game that takes place in a magical industrial environment full of amazing sights and sounds. You must solve puzzles of varying complexity within the environment in order to move forward in the game. Does the gameplay measure up to the graphics? Read on to find out.

(more…)

Physics based puzzler games are definitely a fun way to pass the time. They offer a decent amount of challenge and require some mental effort but they’re still the kind of game you can pick up and play for just a few minutes at a time. A new arrival to the world of physics-based games is Arriving, a simple game where you simply draw lines and shapes to solve the puzzles.

The Arriving story is based around Ano, a young dinosaur that has not yet hatched from his egg. He hasn’t been able to enjoy the world yet, but he was able to avoid the destruction of the dinosaurs. Several years later, he is alive but he lacks the power to break out of the shell. It is your job to help Ano acquire the energy necessary to break through the shell. Read on to learn more about the game and how you can help Ano.

(more…)

Just yesterday, the immensely popular iOS physics and puzzle game “Cut the Rope” arrived on Mac App Store. ZeptoLab, the developer of the game, hopes to attract many avid Mac and iOS gamers alike to this platform with the support of up to a 2560 x 1440 resolution, meaning that it will look great even on your largest display — that is, providing that you do not have an older Mac with a very outdated graphics card.

Now, you’re probably wondering how on earth you can control the game since Macs don’t really have a touchscreen like iOS devices do. Well, it’s actually quite simple really: you use a trackpad. This may sound scary if you own an iMac with a Magic Mouse, and it is, because the game wasn’t really designed to be played with a regular mouse. Read on for more details on this release and our first impressions.

(more…)

There are few game categories that I enjoy exploring and playing more than indie games. There’s something about supporting indie games and their developers that feels like I’m “doing my part.” It’s sort of like the “buying local” of video gaming. But there’s also the feeling of awe and excitement I get when I play amazing games that were birthed into existence without the aid of a major developer or publisher. If you also enjoy indie games, then you probably know that the Mac App Store has, thus far, been a goldmine for such games.

Limbo is an independently developed side-scrolling puzzle game from Playdead that is available on a multitude of platforms. I first played it on the Xbox Live Arcade, but didn’t really get a chance to play all the way through it until I downloaded it on my Mac. Today I’m going to delve into the world of Limbo, and since the best part of playing the game is not knowing what comes next, I’m going to try to do it as spoiler-free as possible! Hit the jump to read on.

(more…)

Page 1 of 212
theatre-aglow
theatre-aglow
theatre-aglow
theatre-aglow