Posts Tagged

safari

Apple has released another update to Safari, version 5.1.4, which has a total of 83 improvements to its performance, stability and, most importantly, security. The renewed offering of Apple’s default browser, which was released on Monday via the Software Update, is available to OS X Snow Leopard and Lion users and clocks in at roughly 45 MB download size (depending on your OS).
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Whether it’s at Starbucks, the mall or Motel 6, free WiFi hotspots are popping up everywhere. While you’re using those hotspots, you might unknowingly be giving away some seriously personal information to an opportunistic hacker or two, including your social network, email, and even your online banking account login credentials.

With personal information like that at risk, you might be tempted to stop using those free hotspots altogether, but an app called Cloak by Bourgeois Bits hopes to alleviate those risks by providing Mac users with a corporate grade VPN service built into a consumer level app. Read on to see if Cloak really is the perfect companion to public WiFi.

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When you purchased your Mac, you probably wanted the best web browser offered, whether it be Chrome, Firefox, Opera, Safari, or some other worthy candidate. After all, quality hardware should also contain quality software. There has been much controversy on what truly is the best browser available for a Mac. Some say that Chrome is, and always will be, the best ever.

Others believe that it’s easier to stay with the default browser because it offers more functionality to the OS. While this is true and I’m not going to attempt to change those believers’ opinions, there is more to the situation than just that. For instance, Chrome does offer more than plugins than Safari does extensions, but this doesn’t necessarily make the latter a weak and functionless application, it just makes it a bit less desirable.

If you’re interested in finding out what browser truly holds the best functionality, speed and other elements then please join in after the break for some information that should fulfill your desires.

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In the Mac browser wars, there are many contenders for the crown. But the big three are Chrome, Safari and Firefox. On my desktop, I found myself using Safari and Chrome more often than Firefox because Chrome looks better and I could ditch Flash on Safari easily.

But more importantly, Firefox was slow to load and didn’t offer anything better for me than Chrome or Safari, so why use it?

Now there’s a reason: Firefox 4 is out and it’s packed with new features that make it worth the download. So what are these fancy new bits that kick Firefox up a notch? Let’s take a look after the break.

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Everybody knows about Safari, and most people agree that it’s good. It’s fast, it’s stable, it’s sexy —  and everybody knows about other popular web browsers like Firefox and Chrome. But there are several other lesser known web browsers that offer cool features that Safari lacks.

Although you don’t need to use them all the time, unless you want to, they’re nice to have around to utilize every once in a while. Whether you’re wanting social integration or parallel sessions, it’s a good idea to have them there.

Let’s take a look at a selection of Safari alternatives!

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Much has been written about Apple’s decision to no longer ship the MacBook Air with Flash pre-installed, and while there are plenty of arguments for and against this, there’s plenty of evidence to suggest that uninstalling Flash can dramatically improve your browsing experience and battery life.

Apple themselves have stated that Flash is the number one cause of crashes in Safari, and—if you’ve ever watched a YouTube video on your MacBook—you’ll know that all the system fans kicking in can’t be good for your battery life.

Unless you spend a great deal of time designing or visiting Flash websites, you should definitely try uninstalling it for a few days. I have, and I won’t be going back in a hurry.

Fortunately, there are a few simple workarounds to make the transition easier and still allow you to use Flash when you really need to.

John Gruber posted a great article on this topic a few weeks ago, explaining that even after installing Flash system-wide, it’s still available in Google Chrome (as it has its own self-contained Flash plugin). For the few times I need Flash on a day-to-day basis, this workaround is more than reasonable for me.

I’ve noticed a far quicker browsing experience, and found that many sites actually serve alternative content when they discover you don’t have Flash installed. This is more notable than when you’re running ClickToFlash, and uninstalling Flash altogether is a more honest process than tricking websites into letting ClickToFlash handle this type of content.

Is this something you’ve tried on your own machine? If not, I’d strongly recommend giving it a go, even if just for a few days! Have your say in the poll above, and let me know your thoughts in the comments.

Extensions support is a relatively new thing for Safari, yet there are already a lot of options for users to take advantage of. Apple’s gallery is even neatly arranged into categories such as productivity extensions, twitter-related extensions, and plenty more to help you find one that meets your needs.

In this roundup, we will go over some of those that can save you time in a certain way. These will range from extensions that enhance your mail, to bookmarking extensions. Read on for your daily dose of time-saving extension goodness!

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Quick Look posts are paid submissions offering only a brief overview of an app. Vote in the polls below if you think this app is worth an in-depth AppStorm review!

In this Quick Look, we’re highlighting Resize. The developer of Resize says that when doing web design, it’s critical to test how your page looks under different screen resolutions. Since the mobile web is exploding fast, you have to test against the mobile devices too. Resize is a Safari Extension that to make the process dead easy.

Read on for more information and screenshots!

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If you’re a fan of browsing photos and videos on the web, you might be interested in CoolIris. So what is it? CoolIris is a browser plug-in that changes the way you view websites. It “revolutionizes” the way you find, view and share photos and videos. Basically, the plug-in turns your browser or desktop into a 3D wall of media that lets you see and enjoy more content without browsing between lots of different websites.

Let’s delve in to take a look at what CoolIris is capable of, and find out why so many people have this software installed on their Mac.

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There was a time when having a download manager made a real difference to one’s experience of using the internet. There are places where this is still true. A few years ago, I spent a month in a remote part of India, where I struggled to top 2k download speeds with my laptop’s modem connecting via a fixed line. I literally waited an hour some days just to download a morning’s email.

A download manager wouldn’t have helped all that much with those messages, but it would have made a huge difference if I had wanted to download any software, music or video files.

That’s the most common use of a download manager: pausing and restarting downloads, scheduling them for later in the day, perhaps after you’ve gone to bed, so that massive download can be ready and waiting in the morning. There are now a number of download managers that can do a whole lot more than this. Speed Download has been the big-hitter for a long time, but (though I bought a licence for the app) I’ve never got along with it.

Recently, I’ve switched over to using Leech, which makes no claim to being as powerful, but turns out to be an excellent, lightweight option that might just do everything you need.

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