Posts Tagged

safari

Apple have just released a new version of Safari. It brings a whole host of improvements including noticeable speed enhancements, new ways to browse and search sites, and a range of interface changes. A few new features to look out for are:

  • Very noticeable speed improvements
  • Top Sites – a way to browse your most commonly frequented sites
  • Cover Flow implementation throughout the browser
  • Tabs are now placed at the top of the window (akin to Google Chrome)

A full list of changes has been posted on the what’s new page. I’m really pleased with the speed improvements, and feel that it’s a worthy Version 4 release. Head over to the download page and let me know what you think!

Safari is a great web browser and works perfectly for many Mac users. Whilst there are a few popular alternatives such as Firefox, a number of less widely known browsers are also available. These range from safety conscious variations for children, through to applications targeted at research and powerful searching.

General web browsing is probably best served by one of the major players in the market, but it is fascinating to know what else is out there should the need arise. I’ll be looking at 8 niche applications, each with their own individual twist to assist with browsing the web.

(more…)

If you’re someone who dips in and out of several web apps on a daily basis, you may be interested to know that an application for OSX can make your life easier. Fluid allows you to create ‘Site Specific Browsers’ (SSBs) – a separate desktop app for each website you use on a regular basis.

In essence, this allows you to have an standalone dock icon for a variety of websites, opening a specific browser for each website when clicked. I use this functionality for accessing Basecamp on a regular basis – it’s far quicker than navigating to the site through a browser bookmark, and keeps whatever you have going on in Safari completely separate.

(more…)

Page 4 of 41234
theatre-aglow
theatre-aglow
theatre-aglow
theatre-aglow