Posts Tagged

sales

As any business owner will tell you, keeping track of your sales leads is one of the most important ways to sustain revenue. Yet this really is no easy task and requires an awful lot of maintenance and reporting, especially when the company is quite large. One company I worked for in Germany kept track of everything through a giant Excel spreadsheet, and keeping this up-to-date was an absolute nightmare, especially as only one person could view and edit it at any one moment in time (and yes, I did get shouted at quite a lot for not maintaining it!).

However Close.io, from developers Elastic Inc, believes it can change this. In short, it has a simple vision:

Never again should a great company fail because of a lack of sales.

Close.io may not be the cheapest offering on the market (plans start from $59 per user monthly) but if it helps a company keep track of all its sales targets, then I think this is a small price to pay for such a useful service. Let’s dive straight in and see what it has to offer.

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For the most part, Apple’s prices on its main products are fairly static (at least for individual purchasers). Students and teachers can get an education discount, and occasionally Apple will toss in an iPod or a printer for free, but generally Apple is a retailer that avoids the idea of frequent sales and discounts.

For this reason, the annual Black Friday sale is a pretty big deal for Apple fans looking to either get someone a gift or pick up a new computer for the office and score another deduction before the tax year ends. This year Apple didn’t really pull out any surprises with the sale: $101 off Macs, $41 off iPads, $21 off iPod touches; nothing too different from last year. These discounts might not seem like much compared to those offered by competitors, but for many Apple customers, it’s a rare opportunity that’s not to be missed.

According to 9to5Mac, the strategy paid off and led to the biggest sales day in Apple history. I’d definitely mark that one up in the success category! Today we want to know if you were a part of that success for Apple. Did you purchase anything on Black Friday? Vote in the poll on the right and then leave a comment below to let us know what new toys you picked up!

Developers have taken one of three approaches with the Mac App Store. It’s either being completely passed over by a developer, used as an additional way to sell their app (as well as through their own website), or adopted as the sole, exclusive way to buy their software.

The initial anecdotal evidence seems to suggest that both of the latter approaches are working extremely well, with many developers seeing sales increase by over ten times the usual number.

But what do you think of the Mac App Store becoming an exclusive sales channel for Mac software? Many developers (such as Pixelmator) have chosen to now sell their software only through the App Store. The advantages are obvious – Apple handles payment, processing, distribution, and gives a serious promotional boost.

Personally, I’m fairly happy with this arrangement. Buying software through the Mac App Store is easy, fast, and a huge improvement over the previous disjointed and inconsistent process that varied significantly between developer websites. Many of the problems that plagued the App Store at the outset are gradually fading away, and we’re starting to see a much improved system with fewer high-profile rejections and judgement errors.

But what do you think? Is selling exclusively through the Mac App Store a great way to simplify your life as a developer, or should software creators be thinking twice before putting all their eggs in Apple’s basket? I’d love to hear your thoughts!

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