Posts Tagged

streaming

YouTube is on the road to becoming a quality replacement for cable television. There are currently many channels that offer daily news coverage, comedians like Rhett & Link have their own weekly program called The Mythical Show, and even The Associated Press, WSJ, and other major news outlets have channels on the video streaming giant. While the browser is still the main way to watch YouTube, mobile platforms have official native apps for the task. Why not on the Mac, then?

Tuba is the answer to a native YouTube solution on Apple’s personal computing operating system. It’s not just another browser window that cleans up YouTube — it’s an app that accesses the API of Google’s network and pulls the videos in directly for your viewing pleasure. But is it worth using over the website?

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There’s a lot of music all over the internet, which is great, except that it’s in a lot of different places. If you want to listen to something on YouTube, something on SoundCloud, and something in your iTunes library, you’re going to need at least two browser tabs open along with iTunes. And if you want to create a playlist, you’re going to have a job of work getting all those tracks in one place.

Enter CloudPlay, a menubar app for streaming music from all over. Currently in beta, CloudPlay lets you search for music from lots of different sources and then pop it all into one playlist. We’ll take a look at how the app works and find out if it’s really that easy. (more…)

As smartphones have advanced over the last few years, their storage capacities have grown by leaps and bounds. All that space means more apps, music, and movies to use while on the go. However, transferring large amounts of media files can be a tedious and time-consuming task, (particularly if you sync over WiFi).

Fortunately, a simple solution exists that allow us to stream our media to phones, tablets and laptops, thus eliminating the need to sync to our various devices. But does the convenience of personal streaming outweigh the limitations inherent to such a solution?

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I love Spotify. In my opinion it’s just about the best thing to happen to radio in my lifetime. I use it more than Pandora, more than Last.fm, even more than Grooveshark.

So what happens when this loyal Spotify user finally agrees to cross over and take a look at Rdio? Read on to find out.

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Despite the rise in popularity of TV on demand, Internet and Twitter, I still like listening to the radio. It offers such a wide variety of songs and different kinds of programs that, for example TV, doesn’t offer. Call me a dinosaur if you will, but I would much rather listen to the radio for a couple of hours than wind it away in front of some lifeless, cheap TV program.

Believe it or not, I don’t actually own a radio – I tune in via the Internet. I am currently based in Germany, and from time to time, I need a good, solid dose of British culture to remind me of my roots. I can get all my British radio stations (such as BBC Radio 1) via the Internet, without having to pay any kind of license fees (unlike television).

When you look at the figures, the popularity of Internet radio is on the rise. In 2007, 11% of the U.S. population listened to the radio via the Internet; in 2008 this figure had crept up to 13% (and is presumably still on the rise). It’s certainly cheaper than buying an actual radio, and you can listen to stations from different parts of the country.

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Once upon a time, physical media sales ruled the music landscape. Wal-Mart thoroughly enjoyed its reign as the largest seller of CDs on the planet. Then iTunes came along and took online music distribution from a niche to the most popular way for people to buy music.

Now a new breed of businesses are beginning to fill the landscape. Instead of offering single songs or albums, they give customers the freedom to listen to any combination of songs or albums they want, either completely free or with a low monthly fee. Are these services merely enjoying rapid but short-lived growth or do they represent the future of how we consume music?

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With Apple recently announcing the Gold Master release of their iOS 4.2 operating system, it isn’t going to be long before we have a chance to play around with the capabilities of AirPlay.

Simply put, this will be a way to stream content between all your different Apple devices. At the outset, you’ll be able to stream music from iTunes to AirPlay enabled devices (as you could previously with the previous iteration, “AirTunes”), and also wirelessly stream video and audio from your iOS device to a new Apple TV.

This new wireless video streaming is something I’m really looking forward to. I often have a video on my iPad that I’d love to watch on a larger screen – or vice versa – I’d like to stream a video from iTunes on my Mac down to my iPad to watch on the couch.

It isn’t really clear what will be possible with AirPlay just yet. Whether it will allow video streaming to/from your Mac seems to be an unknown factor. I really hope that this will be possible, but I guess we’ll find out soon!

I’d love to hear your thoughts on how you’ll be using AirPlay. Is it something you’re really looking forward to, or are you a little bit indifferent about the whole thing? Let us know using the poll above, and feel free to voice your opinion in the comments!

It’s already been established that the top three video game consoles can do a lot more than just play games. The PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 and Nintendo Wii can all act as media hubs and extenders to stream videos, music and photos stored on your Mac.

Streaming content isn’t all that new, but it’s popularity and adoption amongst a wider range of consumers is becoming noticeable. Whether it’s streaming music from the Web or listening to your iTunes playlists remotely, the method of delivering the stuff you want is getting easier to grasp. The best part is that you don’t need much more than some neat software, a home network and, naturally, content you want to enjoy.

What you need to make sure of before you initiate all this is that your game console is connected to your home network, through Ethernet or Wi-Fi. Once the Mac and the console are on the same network, the rest should be easy.

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