Posts Tagged

webdesign

Web development remains one of the areas in which the Mac app ecosystem shines brightest. As the technologies underpinning the internet continue to evolve, we’re thrilled to see eager developers providing new tools to take advantage of those technologies and simplify formerly arduous tasks. Like producing graphics code, for instance.

Last year, I reviewed PaintCode, an app that facilitates the creation of Objective-C interface graphics using natural graphic design tools. PixelCut has expanded their reach with the brand new WebCode, an app that offers the same tools geared toward the creation of code-based graphics for the web.

After the jump, let’s dig in to see if the tools are as useful for web design as they were for app development.

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Today’s review is a little bit technical, as it is specifically aimed for web programmers and designers, or anyone that would like to learn more about CSS. More specifically, we’ll be looking at the newer version of it, CSS3, which comes with a few new goodies like the ability to implement gradients, shadows, border shapes, and other new features in your styles.

These new features, however, are not as easy to code out manually, and making it compatible across multiple browsers is even harder. Today we are reviewing an app that can help web developers to implement these features without getting into too much trouble, as it can help you create new styles and generate the code to implement them. It’s called CSS3 Toolkit, and let’s check it out!
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April 23, 2007. That was the day Panic initially released Coda. The idea of Coda was revolutionary: one app, one window for the entire web development workflow. And they did it right too. They won the 2007 Apple Design Award for Best User Experience. Before Coda there were tools like TextMate, BBEdit and MacRabbit’s Espresso and CSS Edit. Yes, there was even Dreamweaver if you like spending a lot of money on a tool largely considered inferior (it does have its place). But Coda was truly a revolutionary new web development experience.

Before Coda, developing websites required a number of different tools. You need a text editor for writing code. You need an FTP application for uploading and downloading files from your server. You need a web browser to preview your work. You often need a database utility to modify your database. And you would often need a terminal application to connect to your server over SSH and make changes. Coda rolled most of the tools needed for these things into a single interface and application.

And now Coda 2 builds upon that success.

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I’d like to say a big thank you to this week’s sponsor, Flux. Billed as an advanced HTML5 Web design application, Flux is capable of creating stunning sites from scratch. Far from being a simple template based solution, it’s a creative design environment.

Flux can edit existing sites, or create brand new ones using HTML and CSS. You can even drag and drop in pre-designed objects like photo galleries and navigations menus.

Whether you’re wanting to create your first website, or you’re a seasoned pro, Flux is definitely worth giving a try! It’s always good to try out a range of design and development tools, and I’d certainly recommend experimenting with Flux today.

It’s priced at $119.99 on the Mac App Store, and you can download a fully-functional trial from The Escapers website to decide whether its for you.

Have you ever thought that there just has to be an easier way for interacting with the web? How about not having to type the same information into forms repeatedly, or just logging into a website with one single click instead of half a dozen?

With Fake, an app by the developer of the widely popular Fluid, you can finally automate your web-based workflow to save you lots of time and unnecessary clicks. Intrigued? Then read on after the jump.

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I’m a fairly recent Mac switcher and, as a web developer, I started wondering which coding environment I would choose. I spotted two main apps that seemed to stand out from the crowd: Coda and Espresso. Although we’ve covered Espresso in the past, I thought it was worth taking another look at this fantastic web development app today.

When Espresso was reviewed here for the first time, it was still in beta. Though we could see what the app would look like and some of the features it would include, the app wasn’t complete. Since Espresso came out of beta, lots of things have been added to the product. Features such as a project manager and better publishing options have really helped Espresso become an all-round better candidate.

Espresso has some superb features, but also a few aspects that could be improved. And how does it stand up to Panic’s Coda? In today’s review, we’ll put Espresso through its paces.

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If you’re a website designer, developer or blogger, the ability to test websites locally can be remarkably useful. It could serve as a testing environment before uploading a new page to your website, or provide a way to work on a website project without an internet connection.

Although OS X comes bundled with a basic web server installed, a more user-friendly solution is available in the form of MAMP. Today we’ll be walking you through the process of setting up a local server with MAMP and outlining the difference between the basic and pro versions.

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There’s little doubt that OS X is a popular platform for web designers – it offers an enormous range of software for designing, managing, developing and publishing websites. Whether you prefer to use an all-in-one environment for designing websites or a range of different applications, there’s a tool to suit you perfectly.

This article will round up 60 different web design apps for every different conceivable need. And don’t worry if design isn’t your area of expertise; much of the software covered is fairly multi-purpose, suited to a variety of tasks.

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Web design, traditionally, is a task which requires many different applications. You’ll need some sort of text editor, an FTP client, software for navigating documents (generally Finder), a web browser for previewing your site and often another tool for storing code snippets. This has worked well for several years, and any attempt to re-invent such a traditional workflow is commendably risky.

Coda came on the scene just under two years ago as a piece of software capable of integrating each of these different tools into one monolithic application. It received a great deal of acclaim and has come a long way since its conception. This review is far from an “exclusive” – Coda has been covered many times elsewhere over the past few years – but it will go some way towards outlining the features which make it stand out from using several independent applications. I’ll explain the main workflow process, and give my opinion on what works brilliantly and what I miss from dedicated tools.

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